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Dian Fossey

Gorillas Fight Back Against Loathsome Poachers

Dr. Reese Halter | Posted 09.07.2014 | Green
Dr. Reese Halter

Finally, some good news from Africa. Gorillas are fighting back against poachers in the bloody 'War Against Nature.'

Fossey-Fosse: Let's Get Animal

Erich Origen | Posted 05.27.2014 | Comedy
Erich Origen

Fossey-Fosse's unique childhood, spent with both the gorillas of Rwanda and the dancers of Broadway, paved the way for his pioneering work in mating dance science. In his Dance Lab, he tests the effectiveness of specific dance moves from the animal kingdom on arousal levels in human females.

Famed Primatologist Honored Through Stunning Google Doodle

Posted 02.06.2014 | Green

Famed gorilla researcher and conservationist Dian Fossey was honored today, what would have been her 82nd birthday, with a beautiful Google Doodle rep...

Dian Fossey's Murder Remains a Cold Case Despite New Book

Georgianne Nienaber | Posted 03.09.2014 | Books
Georgianne Nienaber

Part memoir, part conservation guide, and part political analysis of modern day Rwanda, Bernard De Wetter's Back in Rwanda does a good job with memoir and conservation, but falls short in other areas. De Wetter is a good writer, but he did not understand Dian Fossey.

Could a Hillary Clinton Avatar Save Congo?

Georgianne Nienaber | Posted 05.25.2011 | World
Georgianne Nienaber

The world will never dispatch a savior to Congo who, like the paraplegic Marine Jake in the James Cameron epic Avatar, will damn self-serving interests and decide to protect a unique world and complicated society.

The Gifts that Keep on Giving

Wendy Diamond | Posted 05.25.2011 | Style
Wendy Diamond

A recent Animalfair.com readership study found that 84% of pet parents will give their furry pals gifts this holiday season. Here are a few different ways you can give gifts that make a difference!

Fox-Owned National Geographic Uses Gorillas as Cover for Exploitation of Congo

Georgianne Nienaber | Posted 05.25.2011 | Media
Georgianne Nienaber

The gorilla photography on the cover of National Geographic Magazine conveys a the message that animals are more important than people. It is colonialist, racist, and supportive of multi-national and strategic interests.