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Genetics

Xavier Cortada's Art: Inspired by Science, and Uniquely Miami

Erin N. Marcus, M.D. | Posted 01.26.2015 | Arts
Erin N. Marcus, M.D.

It had all the trappings of a typical Miami funeral. The eulogists, stifling their tears. The aria, Handel's mournful Piangero la Sorte Mia. The loud lamentations of the black laced lloradera.

What You Are Not Hearing About Ebola

Vivian Norris | Posted 01.05.2015 | Healthy Living
Vivian Norris

At least 30 experts were unable to attend the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Conference in New Orleans these past few days, as the ...

Domestication and a Very Cute Puppy

Zach Dean | Posted 01.04.2015 | GPS for the Soul
Zach Dean

There is a new puppy in my life: Liberty Dean (#totesadorbs, #errrmyghad, #there's-a-new-dog-in-town). She goes by Libby for short and she pees on t...

Chickens Really Don't Look Like They Used To

The Huffington Post | Jacqueline Howard | Posted 10.25.2014 | Science

Chickens have changed. Today's broiler chickens are several times larger than broiler chickens of past decades -- and a new study by researchers in Ca...

The Morality of Artificial Intelligence and the Three Laws of Transhumanism

Zoltan Istvan | Posted 12.02.2014 | Technology
Zoltan Istvan

I'm all for development of superior machine intelligence that can help the world out with its brilliant analytical skills. But programming AI with mammalian ideas, modern-day philosophies, and the fallibilities of the human spirit is dangerous and will possibly lead to total chaos.

The Stupidity of the 'Smart Gene'

Jessica Cussins | Posted 11.25.2014 | Science
Jessica Cussins

All "genes of the week" have something in common: they never actually live up to their billing. For starters, it is never true that a single gene just does something.

Genetic Testing for All Women? Not a Solution to the Breast Cancer Epidemic

Karuna Jaggar | Posted 11.24.2014 | Healthy Living
Karuna Jaggar

Genetic testing is complex, and brings with it a wide range of medical, ethical and scientific issues -- despite years of medical training, even many physicians don't fully understand all the complexity involved.

Addressing a Diversity Problem in Human Genetics

Jennifer Raff | Posted 11.16.2014 | Science
Jennifer Raff

Less than 1 percent of the Ph.D.s in fields related to human genetic research go to Native Americans, and they make up less than one fifth of 1 percent of the members of the American Society of Human Genetics. This is particularly troubling in light of a history of exploitative genetics research with Native American communities.

'Evolution Right Now Is in the Marketplace'

Pete Shanks | Posted 11.12.2014 | Science
Pete Shanks

George Church -- professor at Harvard and MIT, multifaceted researcher, entrepreneur, author and advocate of open-access genomics -- gives good quotation. The latest publication to exploit this is The Economist, which just ran a feature about him called "Welcome to my genome," which includes some of Church's predictions for human genetic modification.

The Bruise

Heather Lens | Posted 10.25.2014 | Parents
Heather Lens

When we first got the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis, it hurt, it hurt parts of me that I didn't know could feel pain. It left us hurt and bruised

7 Things You Need to Know About Google Calico

Abby Norman | Posted 10.24.2014 | Technology
Abby Norman

Since Google has some stake in 23andMe, you can be certain the genomics will be a major focus of Calico's investigations. Genetics too are known to play a role in disease and factors that influence longevity.

Blood Test That Allegedly Predicts Suicide Risk Only Looks Promising in the Media, Not in Science

Cecile Janssens | Posted 10.19.2014 | Science
Cecile Janssens

This simple blood test for the prediction of suicide risks not only lacks a proper scientific basis but signifies unacceptable ignorance of the motives behind suicide thoughts and suicide attempts. Because of the complex nature of suicide, it is unlikely that a genetic test will ever be the key to prevention.

Genes Reveal Reason Pygmies Are So Short

LiveScience | Charles Q. Choi | Posted 08.19.2014 | Science

Pygmy traits independently evolved many times among different peoples around the world, because shorter heights may have helped them live in rainfor...

A New Study on Parental Control Before Conception

Christopher Herz | Posted 10.18.2014 | Science
Christopher Herz

Everyone wants the best for their children. You can see it in the faces of parents shopping for strollers, preschools and nannies who speak five langu...

Genetic Hand-Me-Downs

Greg O'Brien | Posted 10.12.2014 | Healthy Living
Greg O'Brien

My grandmother, Loretta Sinnott Brown, called me "snippy snooper" as a young boy because I was always "snooping around," asking too many questions, fo...

New Study Explodes Big Myth About Musical Ability

LiveScience | Jillian Rose Lim | Posted 08.11.2014 | Science

Practice doesn't always make perfect when it comes to becoming the next Mozart, a new study suggests. Researchers compared pairs of identical twins, ...

Is Postpartum Depression a Disease of Modern Civilization?

Wray Herbert | Posted 09.23.2014 | Science
Wray Herbert

Working with UCLA's Martie Haselton, Chapman University psychological scientist Jennifer Hahn-Holbrook has been exploring the evidence from diverse sources to argue that postpartum depression is linked to early weaning, deficient diet, inactivity, not enough sunshine, and lack of family support.

These Big Guys Surprise Scientists With 'Superior Sense'

LiveScience | Laura Geggel | Posted 07.23.2014 | Science

Elephants are known for their impressively long trunks, but perhaps less well known is the large number of genes that code for their sense smell. In ...

Anna Almendrala

Evidence That Friends Really Are The Family We Choose

HuffingtonPost.com | Anna Almendrala | Posted 07.14.2014 | Healthy Living

Sister from another mister. Brother from another mother. The family you choose. When it comes to describing your friends, those turns of phrase ma...

Ancient Gene May Help Tibetans Live The High Life

AP | MALCOLM RITTER | Posted 07.03.2014 | Science

NEW YORK (AP) — Tibetans living on the "roof of the world" can thank an extinct human relative for providing a gene that helps them adapt to the hig...

Recollections of the Big Bang

Dr. Sten Odenwald | Posted 08.31.2014 | Science
Dr. Sten Odenwald

About 13.8 billion years ago, the hydrogen in my body emerged from the Big Bang. It spent eons just hanging around in the rapidly expanding and cooling universe. As stars became supernovae, the other elements in my body were forged and ejected into space.

On the Perils of Genetic Testing

Mona Gable | Posted 08.21.2014 | Books
Mona Gable

In the fall of 2010, as my brother was dying of colon cancer, I learned a terrifying secret. He also had Huntington's disease, a horrific brain disorder that is passed down in families. Suddenly, even as I was losing my cherished sibling, my childhood soulmate, I was also grappling with my own possible death.

Parenting News From The Future

David Vienna | Posted 08.19.2014 | Parents
David Vienna

This generation of flawless people are blamed for the death of the website Awkward Family Photos, which suffered a lack of content in recent years. So, a growing trend among new parents is to insert flaws into the genetic makeup of their unborn child or, get this, skip genetic alignment.

Who Owns Your Genetic Data? Hint: It's Probably Not You

Techonomy | Posted 08.12.2014 | Science
Techonomy

As we move closer to an era when a sequence of every human genome is the norm, an important question looms. It seems intuitive to many of us that each person owns his or her genetic data and therefore should control access. But the reality is more complex.

A Troublesome Controversy

Pete Shanks | Posted 08.09.2014 | Science
Pete Shanks

As Nicholas Wade's new book demonstrates, the category error that confuses human genetic variation with socially constructed race remains all too common.