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Global Order

Japanese Scholars Say No to War

C. M. Rubin | Posted 07.12.2015 | World
C. M. Rubin

Seventy years after the end of World War II, Manabu Sato (Professor Emeritus, University of Tokyo) believes Japan stands at a critical juncture. "One path," he explains, "is that of a nation that does not wage War; the other, a nation that wages War." Professor Sato and Professor Nakano join me to discuss the issues.

BRICS Leaders Launch Bank, Vow To Coordinate To Protect Economies

Reuters | Darya Korsunskaya, Denis Pinchuk and Katya Golubkova | Posted 07.09.2015 | World

By Darya Korsunskaya, Denis Pinchuk and Katya Golubkova UFA, Russia, July 9 (Reuters) - The BRICS emerging nations said on Thursday ...

How to Avoid Another 1914 in Asia in 2014

Paul J. Keating | Posted 01.10.2015 | World
Paul J. Keating

It is not apparent that policymakers in either the U.S. or China yet seem persuaded that accommodation is necessary. Both seem to underestimate the resolve of the other and hope that they can secure all they want because the other will back down to avoid confrontation. This is how Asia today most resembles Europe in 1914.

WATCH: Putin Lashes Out At West For Destabilizing World

The WorldPost | Nathan Gardels | Posted 11.26.2014 | World

In unusually blunt and candid remarks -- even for Vladimir Putin -- the Russian president lashed out on Friday at the U.S. for destabilizing the world...

A Weaker West Opens the Way for the Rest of the World -- Good and Bad

Pankaj Mishra | Posted 12.20.2014 | World
Pankaj Mishra

This moment demands a fresh interrogation of what theologian Reinhold Neibuhr euphemistically called "the highly contingent achievements of the west," and closer attention to the varied histories of the non-west. Instead, the most common response to the present crisis has been despair over western "weakness" -- and much acrimony over what Barack Obama, president of the "sole superpower" and the "indispensable nation" should have done to fix it.

Answering Four Key Questions About China's Rise

Fu Ying | Posted 12.17.2014 | World
Fu Ying

China may join in discussions about hotspot issues with the aim of seeking a peaceful solution, but it will not turn into a party involved in the conflict or take steps that make the problem worse.

Can China and America Create a '100 Year Peace' Out of Today's Global Chaos?

Dominique Moisi | Posted 11.29.2014 | World
Dominique Moisi

Something like the "bipolar hegemony" of Great Britain and Russia after 1815 (though other players like Austria, Prussia, and France mattered) could be reconstituted, with the US and China substituting for Great Britain and Russia. This seems to be Henry Kissinger's ultimate dream - a dream that one can glimpse in his latest book, Germanically entitled World Order: Reflections on the Character of Nations and the Course of History.

WATCH: What Is China's Leader Thinking?

The WorldPost | Nathan Gardels | Posted 09.12.2014 | World

Can the West work with China's President Xi Jinping to fight climate change and improve global prosperity? Or, is China destined to clash with the Wes...

WATCH LIVE: Hank Paulson On Engaging A Rising China

Asia Society | Posted 04.13.2015 | World

From Asia Society: How did China become a global economic heavyweight so quickly? How is business conducted there? What are the best ways for West...

America's Strategic Fatigue: Who Will Fill the Vacuum?

Joschka Fischer | Posted 10.26.2014 | World
Joschka Fischer

The West does indeed face a high risk of becoming overstretched. But what is the alternative, other than accelerating chaos, mushrooming security risks and serial humanitarian disasters? For the West, this dilemma cannot be avoided. Today's accumulating crises, accompanied by America's strategic fatigue, are forcing Europe to define what role it will play in the future of Western -- and global -- stability. If the U.S. can no longer bear the burden of Pax Americana, Europe must do more for collective security.

The Post-American Multiplex World

Amitav Acharya | Posted 09.13.2014 | World
Amitav Acharya

While elements of the old liberal order will survive, they will have to accommodate new actors and approaches that do not play to America's commands and preferences. The multiplex cinema is an apt analogy for today's post-American world. Several movies are running in different theaters within a single complex. Hollywood style includes thrillers and Westerns with violence, crime, ruggedness and heroism as prominent themes. Bollywood fare offers passion, tragedy, song and dance. Kung fu films produced in Hong Kong and Taiwan play next to patriotic and propaganda films from communist China. No single director or producer would monopolize the audience's attention or loyalty for long. The audience has a choice of shows.

Francis Fukuyama: End of History Still in Sight Despite China's Rise

Winston Shi | Posted 09.08.2014 | World
Winston Shi

According to "End of History" author Francis Fukuyama, China today is much like Bismarck's Germany. It was not a messianic, universalistic or revisionist state, but was very big and powerful, and it had a lot of national interests. China is very much like that today.

America Has Never Faced a Power Like China

Bob Hawke | Posted 08.19.2014 | World
Bob Hawke

China today is a country that is fundamentally more powerful than any that America has ever had to encounter before. It is also a country that has a stronger sense of its place and status than any country in the world except perhaps America itself.

Five Reasons Why the Sky Is Not Falling

Gareth Evans | Posted 07.27.2014 | World
Gareth Evans

BUDAPEST - When it comes to geopolitics, there is always a market for gloom. Business has been booming in this respect lately, with The Economist, Foreign Affairs, and many less exalted journals full of claims that the global order is crumbling, America's ability (and willingness) to save it is in terminal decline, and the prospect of avoiding major conflict in the decade ahead is illusory. Plenty of recent events -- along with the ghosts of 1914 and 1939 -- have boosted the reputations, royalties, and revenues of today's doomsayers. There is Russia's adventurism in Ukraine; China's territorial assertiveness -- and Japan's new push-back nationalism -- in East Asia; continuing catastrophe in Syria and disarray in the wider Middle East; the resurgence of atrocity crimes in South Sudan, Nigeria, and elsewhere in Africa; and anxiety about renewed communal strife in India after Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi's stunning election victory. But, though global political conditions are hardly as good as they could be -- they never are -- there are plenty of grounds for thinking that they are not nearly as bad as so many are claiming. Here are the five most important reasons not to lose as much sleep as some pundits say you should.

Is the World Too Big to Fail? The Contours of Global Order

Noam Chomsky | Posted 06.21.2011 | World
Noam Chomsky

As long as the general population is passive, apathetic, diverted to consumerism or hatred of the vulnerable, then the powerful can do as they please, and those who survive will be left to contemplate the outcome.