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Greece Debt Crisis

The Crisis Is About The Euro, Not Just Greece

David Paul | Posted 07.12.2015 | Politics
David Paul

The underlying question raised by the Greek financial crisis has been largely ignored, which is whether Greek adoption of the euro -- or even the creation of the Eurozone at all -- was a bad idea to begin with, and one that will not get better with time. This is the question that Germany must fear.

Sunday Roundup

Arianna Huffington | Posted 07.11.2015 | Politics
Arianna Huffington

This week the world watched as Greece continued its fight for economic survival. Armed with the Greek people's resounding "no" vote on yet another round of economy-killing austerity measures, Prime Minister Tsipras went back to the negotiating table with EU negotiators. But the rescue package he presented to the Greek Parliament on Friday was a mixed bag: while it includes fresh loans, it also comes with the kind of destructive elements -- like regressive taxes and pension cuts -- that already tanked the Greek economy. As the 28 EU leaders meet today, it's clear that Greece isn't fighting mindless austerity just for Greece, but also for the rest of Europe. The Greek public's bold stance has galvanized anti-austerity groups across Europe. It's like a proxy fight in a new cold war -- but this one isn't East vs. West, it's the failed past vs. a sustainable future.

On The Street In Athens

Margarita Mavromichalis | Posted 07.12.2015 | World
Margarita Mavromichalis

If you would have expected that, after Sunday's clear vote in favor of the "NO," the two rallies should actually become one, you probably don't know us that well.

Understanding the Greece Crisis, in Family Terms

Sara Zervos | Posted 07.11.2015 | World
Sara Zervos

Our family dynamics can give insight into the dilemmas the various constituents face within the European situation as pertaining to Greece.

There Is No Quick Fix for Greece

Greta Van Susteren | Posted 07.11.2015 | World
Greta Van Susteren

Let's face it, no private investor in his right mind -- even one loaded with money -- would lend any to Greece. Not only is Greece in economic and financial shambles, but also Greece just proved it by defaulting on loans.

Live Updates On Greece's Debt Crisis

Posted 07.11.2015 | World

The Greek parliament backed the government's reform proposal to European leaders early Saturday, despite its harsh austerity provisions. Eurozone lead...

Greece Heads To Bailout Talks To Persuade Creditors Over Reform Proposal

AP | RAF CASERT and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG | Posted 07.12.2015 | World

BRUSSELS (AP) -- Bailout discussions between the Greek finance minister and his skeptical counterparts in the 19-country eurozone will resume Sunday a...

Weekend Roundup: China's Equity Bubble and Greece's Debt Hole Rattle the World

Nathan Gardels | Posted 07.10.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

The world was rattled this week by the busted stock market bubble in China and by the "no" vote in Greece last Sunday against austerity policies aimed at reducing the country's unpayable debt. Yet, by week's end, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras appeared to cave in and say "yes" to the very austerity measures voters had rejected in return for a fresh $59 billion bailout package. After $3.2 trillion of value was wiped out by midweek, the uncharacteristically uncertain hand of the Chinese authorities intervened to stop the crash in a stock market they had cheered to ever greater heights over previous months. Meanwhile, the leaders of the BRICS countries met in Russia to bolster plans for their New Development Bank -- which rivals the World Bank -- and declared they would coordinate policies to keep their economies stable amid all the turmoil. Mohamed El-Erian, one of the most influential voices in the global bond market, writes that the link between the Chinese and Greek crises is the stimulative policies of central banks around the world that have led to a debt buildup and created a gap between the inflated value of financial assets and the real economy. (continued)

Greeks Do Not Want to be Pitied

Elena Paravantes RD | Posted 07.10.2015 | World
Elena Paravantes RD

Lately there have been several well-meaning articles inviting and urging readers to help Greece by buying Greek products or planning a vacation in Greece. My answer is this: We would rather you visit Greece and buy Greek products because you like them, not out of pity.

Varoufakis: 'Germany Won't Spare Greek Pain -- It Has An Interest In Breaking Us'

The Guardian | Yanis Varoufakis | Posted 07.10.2015 | World

Greece’s financial drama has dominated the headlines for five years for one reason: the stubborn refusal of our creditors to offer essential debt re...

The App That's Doing Its Part To Help People During The Greek Crisis

HuffPost Greece | Despina Trivoli | Posted 07.10.2015 | World

There has been a lot of discussion in the past few days about how technology can help the Greek economy, which is laboring under anxiety and funds sho...

'Greeks Have Been Pushed To The Abyss'

The Huffington Post | Eline Gordts | Posted 07.10.2015 | World

Every week, The WorldPost asks an expert to shed light on a topic driving world headlines. This time, we discuss the Greek debt crisis with Paul De Gr...

Andrew Lord

New Greek Finance Minister's Signature Looks Like A Penis

HuffingtonPost.com | Andrew Lord | Posted 07.10.2015 | Business

LOL.

Is Travel to Greece About to Get Cheaper?

Hopper.com | Posted 07.10.2015 | Travel
Hopper.com

The euro crisis has many countries in a panic... and potential travelers, too. What does Greece's economic instability (and possible exit from the eurozone) mean for U.S. travelers?

Our Greek Tragedy

Michael Brenner | Posted 07.10.2015 | World
Michael Brenner

The drama that played out in Greece this week is of historic importance. What is at stake goes well beyond the future of the eurozone. It is the very essence of the great postwar civilizational compact that brought unprecedented prosperity and political stability to Europe. For it is the repeal of the understandings, principles and sense of comity associated with that project that is the clear target of the financial forces that control the continent's economic affairs. Alexis Tsipras dared to reject an ultimatum whereby his country would be relegated to a permanent condition of debt servitude or thrown to the wolves of the untamed financial markets. The game is an unsavory one whereby the Troika extract anything of value and transfer it to the banks and hedge fund speculators who made spectacularly reckless loans to previous, compromised government leaders. The resistance to that fate by a government that has received a mandate from the electorate is deemed illegitimate.

European Stocks Jump On Prospect Of Greek Debt Deal

Reuters | Posted 07.10.2015 | World

By Alistair Smout LONDON, July 10 (Reuters) - European stocks surged on Friday after Greece made substantial concessions in its latest bid to win n...

Creditors Welcome Greek Reform Proposal, But Leftists Wary Of More Austerity

AP | Posted 07.10.2015 | World

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece's prime minister acknowledged Friday the reforms his government has proposed in return for a third bailout are harsh an...

Half-truths in the Greek Crisis Conceal the Big Picture

Haridimos Tsoukas | Posted 07.10.2015 | World
Haridimos Tsoukas

True statesmanship is finding the courage and having the intelligence to be wise without experiencing tragedy -- to see the big picture, to acknowledge the right of the other side, to craft space for compromise. Can Eurozone leaders live up to that challenge?

Jason Linkins

World-Historical Deadbeats Demand Greece Pay Up, To Which Thomas Piketty Says 'LOL'

HuffingtonPost.com | Jason Linkins | Posted 07.10.2015 | Politics

So that happened. On this week's podcast, we examine the austerity battles in Greece, break down the latest stage of the Iran nuclear talks, and get a...

Can Tsipras Move From Doublespeak to a Deal?

Andreas A. Papandreou | Posted 07.10.2015 | World
Andreas A. Papandreou

ATHENS -- Tsipras can become a leader of stature and take the deal and side with the vast majority of Greeks on either side of the "Yes"/"No" divide to whom he has promised to remain in the euro and undertake the reforms Syriza has resisted. Alternatively, he can live a short moment of glory as a revolutionary by siding with a small minority of the "no" camp and turn the country into a failed state run by a new set of authoritarian oligarchs.

Greece Submits Reform Proposals To European Creditors

AP | Posted 07.10.2015 | World

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece finally met a deadline that counted on Thursday, delivering a series of sweeping proposals to its creditors before midn...

When Tired Politicians Are Called On To Make Important Decisions

HuffPost Greece | Katerina Nanopoulou | Posted 07.09.2015 | Healthy Living

On June 26, European Commission President Jean Claude Juncker declared that he was exhausted. “I don’t like this way of working, which leaves...

The Collateral Damage of Austerity

Robert Koehler | Posted 07.09.2015 | Politics
Robert Koehler

The austerity packages Greece has endured as its condition of economic bailout over the past half-decade have not only further gutted the country's broken economy and prevented any sort of recovery toward self-sufficiency, but have shattered the socioeconomic structure of life.

Message to Merkel: Think Outside the Box

Oliver R. Goodenough | Posted 07.09.2015 | Politics
Oliver R. Goodenough

The Greek debt crisis is a collision of two seemingly incompatible necessities. One is to put the Greek economy into a position for long term health; the other is to keep it from expiring in the short term. If these are to be reconciled, the players in Europe need to think outside the box, rather than retreat into bluster, blame, and the repetition of old positions.

The Greek Crisis Digs Up the Art of Compromise

Dr. Jovan Kurbalija | Posted 07.09.2015 | Good News
Dr. Jovan Kurbalija

Compromise is as old as humanity. It can be traced back to the moment when our far predecessors realized that it was better to hear the message than to eat the messenger.