iOS app Android app

Haiti Cholera Outbreak

Why The Haitian Cholera Victims Deserve Their Day In Court

Jason Silverstein | Posted 06.30.2016 | Science
Jason Silverstein

One out of every fourteen Haitians has been infected with cholera. They deserve an official forum to examine why this happened and who is responsible.

30 Thousand Haitian Lives Lost to U.N. Cholera

Gina Athena Ulysse | Posted 06.06.2016 | Black Voices
Gina Athena Ulysse

While some claim the U.N. official's promise to fully commit to ensuring the organization fulfills its human rights obligations concerning the cholera...

For US in Haiti, Black Votes Don't Matter

Mark Weisbrot | Posted 01.29.2016 | World
Mark Weisbrot

Basically, Haitians managed to put Washington in the situation of having to maintain that a runoff election with only one candidate, businessman Jovenel Moïse, would be legitimate, or postpone the election.

On Human Rights Day, Haitians Have A Message for the UN

Beatrice Lindstrom | Posted 12.11.2015 | Impact
Beatrice Lindstrom

UN peacekeepers brought cholera to Haiti in 2010 by discharging untreated human waste into Haiti's largest river. Haiti now has the world's worst cholera epidemic - over 9,000 people have died and over 760,000 have sought hospital care.

What's Working: Public Health Progress Since the Haiti 2010 Earthquake

Tom Frieden, MD, MPH | Posted 06.01.2015 | World
Tom Frieden, MD, MPH

As a country, Haiti has faced and continues to face enormous difficulties, but it has also proven remarkably resilient.

The View From the Window

Sheila Davis, DNP, ANP-BC, FAAN | Posted 03.08.2014 | Impact
Sheila Davis, DNP, ANP-BC, FAAN

Haiti is a tough place to live and be healthy. According to the CIA Factbook, it ranks 34th in maternal mortality and 41st for infant mortality globally. The mothers that make it to a hospital like Belladère and receive care are the lucky ones.

Do As We Say, Not As We Do: The Haitian Cholera Epidemic and the Moral Legitimacy of the United Nations

Beatrice Lindstrom | Posted 10.19.2013 | World
Beatrice Lindstrom

Cholera, a water-borne disease that can kill in a matter of hours, was introduced into Haiti via untreated human waste that leaked from a UN peacekeeping base into the river that serves as the water source for tens of thousands of Haitians.

Arms Race -- Getting Ahead of Killer Microbes

Tom Frieden, MD, MPH | Posted 07.30.2013 | Science
Tom Frieden, MD, MPH

The basic tools of disease tracking and data analysis -- which CDC's disease detectives and others relied on to eradicate smallpox, identify Legionnaires' disease, and stop SARS -- remain essential. But they are no longer enough.

Cholera Deaths: The New Norm in Haiti?

Dr. Ralph Ternier | Posted 11.06.2012 | Impact
Dr. Ralph Ternier

The loss of funding means that in months, thousands of patients -- people we have the tools, skills, and expertise to save -- will become sick, and hundreds more may needlessly die. This wouldn't be accepted in a wealthy country. And we're not willing to accept it in Haiti.

Staying Optimistic About UN Justice

Beatrice Lindstrom | Posted 12.19.2012 | World
Beatrice Lindstrom

My vision for a just world is one that the UN itself has inspired, and one that I believe the UN ultimately shares. But to reclaim its position as a credible force for human rights, the UN must first allow accountability to be a part of the conversation about ending cholera in Haiti.

Hurricane Isaac Threatens Haiti's Vulnerable

Richard Walden | Posted 10.24.2012 | Impact
Richard Walden

Haiti has for decades been the poorest country in our hemisphere and it was set far back by the disasters which have befallen it since 2008. It behooves us, therefore, to do better than we have done and to beseech those relief agencies which still have cash.

Baseball and Science in the Time of Cholera

Rishi Rattan | Posted 10.09.2012 | Impact
Rishi Rattan

I admire my UN colleagues who tirelessly strive to create evidence-based solutions, reconciliation, and justice for Haiti, yet the UN's failure to acknowledge data impedes their own staff's progress.

Rudy's Armor: A Cholera Vaccine in Haiti

Jason Hayes | Posted 10.09.2012 | Impact
Jason Hayes

To Rudy Laurent and his family, cholera seemed to be everywhere. Now, Laurent has a little bit of armor. In his wallet he carries a vaccination card; in his blood he carries two antigens (cell parts that spur our immune system to build antibodies) made in Hyderabad, India.

Latrines with Walls: Preventing Cholera in Haiti

Jason Hayes | Posted 09.29.2012 | World
Jason Hayes

How exactly you tip the scales is an extremely complicated matter. In the fields and rice paddies when people need to use the bathroom, they just go. By the river, when people are thirsty in this heat that makes your breath draw like gel, they just have a drink.

Haitian Mothers and the Meaning of Rain

Wynn Walent | Posted 07.08.2012 | Impact
Wynn Walent

I have spent the last two years in Haiti, and the sound of rain is forever changed. Where the sound of rain once brought comfort, it now brings worry that comes with my intimate knowledge of what rain means these days in Haiti.

Baseball in the Time of Cholera

Olivia Wilde | Posted 06.18.2012 | Impact
Olivia Wilde

Baseball in the Time of Cholera follows the effects of the cholera outbreak on a young Haitian athlete. We made this film because it is simply not an option to let the 7,000 people killed disappear into the cold swamp of statistics.

Has Foreign Aid Hurt Haiti: An Interview with Mario Joseph

Dr. Tukufu Zuberi | Posted 06.06.2012 | Black Voices
Dr. Tukufu Zuberi

Mario Joseph is Haiti's most influential and respected human rights attorney. Since 1996, he has led the Bureau des Avocats Internationaux (BAI) in Port-au-Prince, which uses prominent human rights cases and a victim-centered approach in the interest of the poor majority.

The UN and Cholera in Haiti

Abby Goldberg | Posted 04.16.2012 | World
Abby Goldberg

On Monday, the United Nations Security Council began a four-day mission in Haiti to evaluate their peacekeeping and reconstruction efforts. Part of their trip will include a visit to a treatment center for victims of cholera. A visit is a good start, but not enough.

Haiti Earthquake Aid: Champagne, Cruise Ships & Cholera

John Hrabe | Posted 03.13.2012 | Impact
John Hrabe

Cheryl Mills has the unenviable task of coordinating America's aid efforts in Haiti. That's why I've selflessly volunteered to help her out by listing the five things she forgot to mention about Haiti's recovery.

Finding Hope in Haiti

Sheila C. Johnson | Posted 03.19.2012 | Black Voices
Sheila C. Johnson

I toured Haiti last week with one of the greatest creative minds in the world -- my friend Donna Karan, whose Urban Zen Foundation is doing extraordinary work to help Haiti's people design their own future. Amidst Haiti's devastation, here is beauty, alive and well.

Soccer in Haiti: 2 Years After the Quake

Deji Olukotun | Posted 03.13.2012 | World
Deji Olukotun

The world has focused on rebuilding Haiti after this tragedy, but it's important not to lose sight of Haiti's rich traditions. One of them is soccer.

Haiti: Cholera Down but People Still "Abandoned Like Stray Dogs"

Georgianne Nienaber | Posted 11.21.2011 | World
Georgianne Nienaber

There is mixed news from Haiti in the last few weeks, but all of it reflects a government paralyzed by a combination of foreign meddling, an administration hamstrung by a balky Parliament, and the refusal of foreign donors to make good on pledges.

Keeping Hope Alive in Haiti's Tent Cities

Rep. Yvette D. Clarke | Posted 07.17.2011 | World
Rep. Yvette D. Clarke

Almost 700,000 Haitians who lost their homes in the quake are still living in appalling conditions. The majority of these people still lack access to basic services like healthcare, clean water, toilets, sanitation and live in tattered shelters.

Did UN Peacekeepers Bring Cholera to Haiti? Expert Panel Hedges Bets

Evelyn Leopold | Posted 07.05.2011 | World
Evelyn Leopold

A South Asian strain of cholera contaminated a river where Haitians drink, wash, bath and swim, causing an outbreak that killed over 4,000 people in the past year, a UN-appointed panel reported late on Wednesday.

Haiti: Pointing Fingers and Embracing Failure

Tom Murphy | Posted 05.25.2011 | Impact
Tom Murphy

Many have been quick to point fingers and assign blame for the slow speed of recovery in Haiti. This can dangerously lead to a poorly-informed public and a skewed set of incentives for donors and NGOs.