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The Author and Editor Relationship: Professional Sparring Partners

Kristen Houghton | Posted 11.23.2015 | Books
Kristen Houghton

I have the utmost respect for editors. It is their job to see that your book is readable and flows from start to finish. There will always be times, however, when disagreements about characters, lines, and scenes are going to happen. And those disagreements are a good thing.

An Extraordinary Library: The Lilly Library, Indiana University

Regina Fraser and Pat Johnson | Posted 10.01.2015 | Travel
Regina Fraser and Pat Johnson

After living in the Midwest for about 30 years I really didn't know too much about Indiana -- it seemed like a nice state but my sense was that the state was pretty limited, culturally.

Art in the Blood - A Rousing Sherlock Holmes Adventure

Paola K Amaras | Posted 10.01.2015 | Books
Paola K Amaras

Bonnie MacBird 'found' Art in the Blood - A Sherlock Holmes Adventure, as a manuscript hidden in a forgotten tome of Victorian medical lore, and has brought us another adventure of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's great consulting detective Sherlock Holmes, as narrated by his companion, Dr. John Watson.

How Many Novels Should You Write in a Year? Bad Advice for Writers Has Your Answer!

G. Doucette | Posted 09.21.2015 | Books
G. Doucette

We've been dispensing official Bad Advice for a little while now (for instance, here, here and here), and we take this job seriously, because legitimately bad advice for writers is an art form, and we like to take our time crafting that advice. We have a laboratory. And white coats. We look adorable in them.

What Editors and Booksellers Are Reading This Summer

Joseph Olshan | Posted 06.24.2015 | Books
Joseph Olshan

If you're an editor like myself, you have a lot of manuscripts to read. If you're a bookseller, you've got to stay on top of what's being published. This summer it seems like most of the editors and booksellers I know are reading A Little Life, Hanya Yanagihara's second novel.

The Museum and Library of the Hispanic Society of America: A Hidden Gem in New York City

Barbara Ernst Prey | Posted 06.02.2015 | Arts
Barbara Ernst Prey

The Museum and Library of The Hispanic Society of America is perhaps the least known of New York City museums, yet it has an extraordinary collection. I recently spent a delightful afternoon at the museum, which reflects the vision of Archer Milton Huntington to establish an institution dedicated to the celebration of Hispanic culture.

What Indie Authors Need to Know About Their Manuscripts

IndieReader | Posted 05.12.2015 | Books

Before you have a printed book, you have a manuscript. These are different things, connected but distinct, like a butterfly and a caterpillar. Some indie authors get confused between the two. They have unrealistic expectations of their manuscript.

Manuscript Critiques: Writers Raise Money for Long Term Caregivers

Randy Susan Meyers | Posted 01.17.2015 | Books
Randy Susan Meyers

In the case of this CAREGIFTED fundraising initiative, writers--from world-renowned to beginners--are providing that help as writers bid on manuscript critiques provided by celebrated authors.

The Art of Adaptation

A.J. Walkley | Posted 07.31.2012 | Books
A.J. Walkley

Along with simply taking a nearly 300-page book and getting it down to, at most, 120-pages, there is a lot more that needs to be done in order to get the same message across in a much more visual platform.

Percy Bysshe Shelley "On Life"

Carolyn Vega | Posted 03.10.2012 | New York
Carolyn Vega

2012-01-09-pullquote.jpgThis essay, which is considered one of his most important prose works, was first penned sometime in late 1819 in the back of a small vellum-bound notebook.

What Heaven Looks Like: Part 4 -- World's Strangest Paintings for the New Year

James Elkins | Posted 02.27.2012 | Arts
James Elkins

I am serializing an unpublished book in this column. It's about an amazing, mysterious manuscript I discovered in Scotland.

What Heaven Looks Like: Part 3

James Elkins | Posted 02.05.2012 | Arts
James Elkins


King John's 1205 Charter

Carolyn Vega | Posted 12.18.2011 | New York
Carolyn Vega


Coleridge Varies His "Inscription on a Time-piece"

Carolyn Vega | Posted 11.20.2011 | New York
Carolyn Vega

In the late 1890s, an unknown dealer or collector assembled letters that were titled Sir Walter Scott: Letters of his Friends and Contemporaries. One of my favorite items in this is a poem in the hand of a very aged Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Anonymous Scott

Carolyn Vega | Posted 11.15.2011 | New York
Carolyn Vega

Recently, I read Scott's letters to the Marchioness of Abercorn. Their correspondence began in 1806 (with a letter, incidentally, that contains the earliest surviving reference to his work on The Lady of the Lake), and for a number of years they wrote each other frequently.

The Research Fellowship That Uncovered a New Story of 19th Century New York

The New York Public Library | Posted 05.25.2011 | New York
The New York Public Library

Steven Carl Smith is working on a dissertation about New York City in the 19th century, with a focus on the publishing industry and how it developed.

A Getty Curator Discusses Manuscripts, France, And The Middle Ages: Imagining The Past

Elizabeth Morrison | Posted 05.25.2011 | Arts
Elizabeth Morrison

Manuscripts often contain written accounts and visual representations of history, but sometimes the history of a manuscript -- who commissioned it, ho...

Kafka Manuscripts: The Fight Over Kafka

Rodger Kamenetz | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
Rodger Kamenetz

Who does Kafka belong to? The court case in Israel over the past two years will eventually decide the proper ownership of certain manuscripts of Kafka's.

"Slush Pile": Where Did The Words Come From?

The Awl | Jane Hu | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books

According to the OED, the first occurrence of "slush pile" was not in reference to what we commonly now know as unsolicited manuscripts from unheard-o...