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Movie Reviews

The Difficult Trip to Tomorrowland

Dwight Brown | Posted 05.22.2015 | Entertainment
Dwight Brown

If you took the world of The Jetsons, and made it a live-action film location, that would describe the visuals for the mysterious, glorious and fantastical place of Brad Bird's Tomorrowland. Seeing it is easy. Getting there is difficult.

Zaki's Review: Tomorrowland

Zaki Hasan | Posted 05.22.2015 | Entertainment
Zaki Hasan

In a bitter bit of déjà vu, Tomorrowland ends up suffering from the exact same flaws Prometheus before it did: Great premise, terrific visuals, airball at the buzzer.

Ex Machina Movie Review: Should We Be Scared?

Katharine Rose | Posted 05.20.2015 | Entertainment
Katharine Rose

There are many reasons to be impressed with Ex Machina, the recently released, exceptionally well-done sci-fi thriller directed by Alex Garland, starring Oscar Isaac, Domhnall Gleeson and Alicia Vikander. Most notably, however, is its ability to be both ordinary and unique at the same time.

Zaki's Review: Mad Max: Fury Road

Zaki Hasan | Posted 05.15.2015 | Entertainment
Zaki Hasan

Featuring Tom Hardy in the role that first launched Mel Gibson's star into the stratosphere, Fury Road is a worthy addition to the canon.

Review -- Mad Max: Fury Road

Dwight Brown | Posted 05.14.2015 | Entertainment
Dwight Brown

The original director George Miller has breathed new life into that classic franchise and the result is an absolutely riveting, visually arresting and perfectly acted film that sets up a netherworld where water and gasoline are at a premium, evildoers rule and humanity is down on its luck.

Movie Review: 1001 Grams -- The Measure of Life

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.14.2015 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

I am a big fan of Norwegian filmmaker Bent Hamer. The Norwegian films of his that have made it to American screens -- Kitchen Stories, O'Horten and now 1001 Grams (currently in limited release) reveal a miniaturist dealing in microcosms that reveal the world.

Movie Review: Mad Max: Fury Road -- Taking the Long Way

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.12.2015 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

"Fury Road" is less a sequel than a reimagining of this post-apocalyptic mythology.

'Where Hope Grows': A Review

International Down Syndrome Coalition | Posted 05.12.2015 | Impact
International Down Syndrome Coalition

The International Down Syndrome Coalition staff had the privilege of a private screening of Where Hope Grows. Staff members were impressed and moved by the film. This inspiring movie shatters stereotypes of those with Down syndrome.

ReThink Review: Welcome to Me -- Mental Illness on the Air

Jonathan Kim | Posted 05.08.2015 | Entertainment
Jonathan Kim

I don't think Welcome to Me is trying to make any larger statements about the world or mental disorders, but the film is an interesting reflection on the role television continues to hold in our lives.

Movie Review: The D Train -- Hop Aboard

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.08.2015 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

As squirm comedies go, The D Train is a breed apart, a film that puts new spin on the bromance. 

Movie Review: Avengers: Age of Ultron -- The End Is Nigh

Marshall Fine | Posted 05.01.2015 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

These feel like cinematic end times -- not in terms of Hollywood movies (that horse is already out of the barn), but in the pack-mentality, "hey, it's good enough" approach of critics to the colossus that bestrides summer movies, otherwise known as the Marvel Universe.

Review - Avengers: Age of Ultron

Dwight Brown | Posted 05.01.2015 | Entertainment
Dwight Brown

They're back. The chummy Marvel superheroes assemble once again to fight evil. In this case it's Ultron, a vicious technological villain hell-bent on ridding earth of human life. There is little in this film that is new, but that doesn't matter. The characters are still entertaining.

Zaki's Review: Avengers: Age of Ultron

Zaki Hasan | Posted 04.29.2015 | Entertainment
Zaki Hasan

The film takes a performance by the impossibly charismatic James Spader, and purposes it in service of an impossibly dull CGI automaton. It's a bit perplexing that Ultron manages to get so much right except for the very villain whose name is in the title.

Tumbledown at Tribeca

Anne Margaret Daniel | Posted 04.27.2015 | Entertainment
Anne Margaret Daniel

Hunter Miles is dead, and also immortal. This is the spirit, but not the heart, of Tumbledown, a rare new movie that had its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival last week.

'Little Boy' Stands Tall

Jackie K. Cooper | Posted 04.26.2015 | Entertainment
Jackie K. Cooper

The movie follows "little boy's" path to faith and shows how it affects the entire town. This is done in a way that is not maudlin, but heart-warming. If it causes tears to flow, well that is the nature of the circumstances, and not a cheap way to wrest emotion from the audience.

ReThink Review: Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck - The Man Inside the Wail

Jonathan Kim | Posted 04.24.2015 | Entertainment
Jonathan Kim

It's difficult to imagine a documentary about Kurt Cobain that could be more thorough, intimate, and definitive than Montage of Heck, which has more than enough rare and exclusive material that will surely be new to even the most obsessive Nirvana completist.

Movie Review: Ex Machina -- Mechanical

Marshall Fine | Posted 04.24.2015 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Ex Machina is both tastily minimal and frustratingly simplistic. Alex Garland's directing debut (he wrote 28 Days Later and Sunshine) is, in essence, a three-hander about three people in a house. OK, a high-tech mansion, but you get the point. 

Noah Baumbach Is the Naked Emperor

David Fagin | Posted 04.20.2015 | Entertainment
David Fagin

While We're Young follows in the footsteps of the majority of Baumbach's work, as it succeeds admirably in achieving its apparent goal of being yet another terrifically mediocre film.

Movie Review: Child 44 -- Leave This One Behind

Marshall Fine | Posted 04.18.2015 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Certainly the pedigree of Child 44 makes it seem promising. But the timing of the release -- April, a pre-summer graveyard -- and the fact that it wasn't screened for critics until shortly before opening both mitigate against it. 

Movie Review: Alex of Venice -- Mopey

Marshall Fine | Posted 04.18.2015 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

The directing debut of actor Chris Messina, Alex of Venice is as notable for what it doesn't do as for what it does. This is the story of a married parent suddenly forced to realign priorities when their spouse walks out. Think Kramer vs. Kramer - and then make the central character a woman instead of a man.

ReThink Review: Clouds of Sils Maria -- Actors Can Be Smart

Jonathan Kim | Posted 04.17.2015 | Entertainment
Jonathan Kim

An actor's preparation is one of the main subjects of the excellent Clouds of Sils Maria, where Stewart co-stars with the luminous Juliette Binoche in a film that reveals aspects of an actor's life few ever see.

Movie Review: True Story -- Faking it

Marshall Fine | Posted 04.15.2015 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

True Story is not a bad movie; indeed, it's a creepy little tale that has moments that will unnerve you. But the limitations of its script and of Jonah Hill's performance in the central role keep it from transcending its shortcomings.

Our Movie Debut

Randi Evans | Posted 04.13.2015 | Women
Randi Evans

How often is a small town girl from Ohio confronted with an opportunity to show her son what making a movie is all about? NEVER! So I thought... what the heck, why not? We spend most of our weekends watching movies, why not be in one?

ReThink Review: Ex Machina -- Our Androids, Ourselves

Jonathan Kim | Posted 04.10.2015 | Entertainment
Jonathan Kim

There are so many questions we don't seem to be asking right now about the arrival of these potentially intelligent machines. And that is the genius of Alex Garland's film Ex Machina, a must-see that is one of the best, smartest, and most elegant films about artificial intelligence ever made.

Freetown

Dwight Brown | Posted 04.07.2015 | Black Voices
Dwight Brown

Freetown doesn't tell its story with the eloquence and understatement of Abderrahmane Sissako's Timbuktu or the solid dramatic flourishes of Terry George's Hotel Rwanda. Still, the film depicts a part of African history that is worth knowing and sharing.