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Mubarak Resigns

Why The Past Is Crucial To Egypt's Future

The Cairo Review Of Global Affairs | Posted 09.13.2011 | World

As Egypt's post-revolutionary politics oscillate between protest and politics, the uneven progress of change has led to widespread frustration and sus...

Lara Logan Released From Hospital

Posted 05.25.2011 | Media

UPDATE # 2: The New York Times and The Wrap both reported that President Obama called Lara Logan on Wednesday afternoon. The White House would not pro...

CBS: Lara Logan Suffered 'Brutal' Sexual Assault In Egypt

Posted 05.25.2011 | Media

UPDATE: Lara Logan is reportedly being released from the hospital on Wednesday. ORIGINAL POST: CBS News says correspondent Lara Logan "suffered a b...

The (Sometimes) Incredible Power of Nonviolent Protest

Michael Schwartz | Posted 05.25.2011 | World
Michael Schwartz

Memo to Obama: Since your intelligence people didn't tell you, let me fill you in on why, by simply staying in the streets, the Egyptian people were able to topple a tyrant with 30 years seniority, sweeping him into the dustbin of history.

Signs I Didn't See in Tahrir Square: Death to America! Death to Israel!

Miles Mogulescu | Posted 05.25.2011 | World
Miles Mogulescu

It seems clear that for the young revolutionaries in the streets of Cairo, America and Israel are some of the last things on their minds. This is an indigenous Egyptian movement. It's about lifting 30 years of political repression.

Envisioning a Green Egypt

Levi Ben-Shmuel | Posted 05.25.2011 | Green
Levi Ben-Shmuel

Energy independence from Middle East oil would dramatically change the balance of power. Once petrodollar revenue declined, financial support for terrorist organizations would wither.

Egypt's Nawal El Saadawi: "We Will Not Let Egypt Burn"

Rebecca Walker | Posted 05.25.2011 | World
Rebecca Walker

Nawal El Saadawi has been agitating for change in her home country for more than 50 years I caught up with her as she was heading out into the streets of Cairo -- right before President Mubarak stepped down.

Sunday Roundup

Arianna Huffington | Posted 05.25.2011 | World
Arianna Huffington

In response to Mubarak stepping down, President Obama delivered a pitch perfect speech calling for "nothing less than genuine democracy," not just a government aligned with U.S. interests. There will be many foreign policy takeaways from Egypt, but here's an obvious one: invading a country, toppling its regime, destroying civil society, and then trying to put all the pieces back together with a ten-year occupation and a few trillion dollars turns out not to be the only way to increase the spread of democracy in the Middle East. Wired was more effective than warred. People can now connect to each other faster than any government can connect with its people. And while governments may be able to shut down the hardware, they can't shut off the social effects of digital networks. Any leader who doesn't understand this dynamic should book a room next to wherever Mubarak is heading.

An Egyptian Revolution? It's Still Too Soon to Say

William Astore | Posted 05.25.2011 | World
William Astore

In raising concerns about the long-term meaning and results of Egypt's revolution, we must return to the very definition of revolution: a rapid, fundamental, and violent domestic change in the dominant values and myths of a society.

Egypt: The King's Speech Where Everyone Is King

Charlie Firestone | Posted 05.25.2011 | Technology
Charlie Firestone

While the radio of the 1930's was the stammering George VI's proving ground, today we see new media amplifying the "king's speech" in Egypt. Except this time, the people are "king."

After Egypt: Arab Voices Matter

James Zogby | Posted 05.25.2011 | World
James Zogby

All too often the West has acted across the Middle East as if Arabs were objects without sensibilities or concern. It is no longer possible to operate as if Arab public opinion doesn't matter.

Reading the Pictures: Day 18: The Fall of Mubarak -- Exclusive Photos From Cairo

Michael Shaw | Posted 05.25.2011 | Media
Michael Shaw

2011-02-12-egypt.jpgAfter the bitter disappointment of last night, Cairo was like a tinderbox today. Still, politeness triumphed over anger as army troops worked things out with protesters.

'Egypt Is Free' Chants Ring Through Cairo

AP | By MAGGIE MICHAEL and LEE KEATH | Posted 05.25.2011 | World

CAIRO -- Cries of "Egypt is free" rang out and fireworks lit up the sky as hundreds of thousands danced, wept and prayed in joyful pandemonium Friday ...

Rooting for Egypt

Kristen Breitweiser | Posted 05.25.2011 | World
Kristen Breitweiser

Today's victory of the peaceful Egyptian protesters torpedoes the notion that the only effective means to an end in the Middle East must center on violence.

Mubarak Resignation Cheered By World Markets

AP | CARLO PIOVANO | Posted 05.25.2011 | Business

LONDON — Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's decision to hand power to the military boosted stocks around the world on Friday as hopes grew for a...

Why Mubarak Had to Go

Stephen Herrington | Posted 05.25.2011 | World
Stephen Herrington

Mubarak had to go to show anyone who might replace him that he can be brought down, too. With that message, the transition of power is more likely to produce a successor for whom the will of the people is foremost.

The Media Reacts..See The Front Pages

Posted 05.25.2011 | Media

The news that Hosni Mubarak had stepped down as president of Egypt sparked a joyous reaction across the country--and a wave of headlines, splashes, sl...

Mubarak Steps Down: Tahrir Square, Egypt Erupts In Cheers (VIDEO)

Posted 05.25.2011 | World

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has stepped down after a reign of 30 years, finally heeding to calls from protesters the last 18 days. His new home w...

Photos: See Mubarak's New Home, Sharm El-Sheikh

Posted 05.25.2011 | Travel

Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, is reportedly Mubarak's new home. Aside from having a website straight out of 1995, and being the new home for President Hos...

An Egyptian Voice of Democracy Says, 'Tell Old Pharaoh, Go'

Michael Winship | Posted 05.25.2011 | World
Michael Winship

Mubarak and Suleiman should have listened to the words of an Egyptian woman named Olfa G. Tantawi. Perhaps they would have realized sooner that the culture of democracy was not far away at all but right at their very doorstep, insistently knocking.