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Patricia Highsmith

Carol Composer Carter Burwell: An Interview

Regina Weinreich | Posted 02.22.2016 | Entertainment
Regina Weinreich

Todd Haynes' film Carol, an evocative love story set in the 1950's, adapted from an edgy Patricia Highsmith novel, The Price of Salt, is nominated for...

Seed of the Glittering Republic

Richard J. Rosendall | Posted 02.02.2016 | Queer Voices
Richard J. Rosendall

My greatest satisfaction as an activist lies in the changed expectations of today's children, made possible by countless thousands of us who came before them.

The Gift of Architecture

J. Michael Welton | Posted 01.07.2016 | Arts
J. Michael Welton

It is a truth universally acknowledged that any architecture aficionado must be in want of a good book for the holiday season. So I'm pleased to offer a few recommendations of volumes recently reviewed at Architects + Artisans, with links to posts and ordering details.

Essay: Patricia Highsmith's The Price of Salt -- The Lesbian Novel That's Now a Major Motion Picture

The National Book Review | Posted 11.24.2016 | Books
The National Book Review

The movie Carol, starring Cate Blanchette and Rooney Mara, opened in New York and Los Angeles last weekend. Carol, which has gotten rave reviews and is generating Oscar talk, is based on The Price of Salt, a novel by Patricia Highsmith.

Women in Love: Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara Dazzle in 'Carol'

Jake Nevins | Posted 11.20.2016 | Arts
Jake Nevins

Because of this -- the immutability of the film's characters and the brilliant reincarnation of a zeitgeist -- Carol operates simultaneously as character sketch, period piece and aesthetic marvel.

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara in Carol: Women Who Love Women

Regina Weinreich | Posted 11.19.2016 | Entertainment
Regina Weinreich

The Oscar buzz around Todd Haynes' new movie Carol may focus on the two women, Cate Blanchett's Carol and Rooney Mara's Therese, but Phyllis Nagy's adapted screenplay, from Patricia Highsmith's novel The Price of Salt, will surely garner an Oscar nod too.

3 New Articles About Books to Read Right Now

The National Book Review | Posted 10.16.2016 | Books
The National Book Review

Three great reads about books, from The New York Review of Books, Atlas Obscura, and The New Yorker.

First Nighter: Nifty Thriller 'Pimm's Cup,' Not-So-Nifty 'Happy 50ish' Musical

David Finkle | Posted 08.07.2016 | Arts
David Finkle

It's a slick little thriller, Christopher Stetson Boal's Pimm's Mission, directed snugly by Terrence O'Brien at 59E59 as an Oberon Theatre Ensemble undertaking. By "little," I mean the drama packs its nastiness into only 60 minutes plus.

Todd Haynes at Cannes: New Film 'Carol' Stuns With Elegance

Karin Badt | Posted 05.19.2016 | Entertainment
Karin Badt

Carol, the story of a love affair between a young pretty shop clerk (Rooney Mara) and a wealthy unhappy housewife (Cate Blanchett), set in 1950s New York City, stuns with its sensuousness, reminding one of the Hollywood cinema of old, where the camera takes time with lingering shots on characters, turning them into stars.

Switzerland at the Geffen Playhouse

Hoyt Hilsman | Posted 05.14.2015 | Arts
Hoyt Hilsman

Crime novelist Patricia Highsmith was renowned for her intense psychological thrillers, particularly her series featuring the murderer Tom Ripley, but she was also known for her reclusive, abrasive and even hateful personality.

Venice, in Prose and Photographs

J. Michael Welton | Posted 01.06.2015 | Arts
J. Michael Welton

If Venice is a dream state, then a new book about the city built on a lagoon is its vivid interpretation.

Gone Girl Keeps Going

The New York Public Library | Posted 12.03.2014 | Books
The New York Public Library

In honor of this NYPL all-star novel being turned into a film, the Library's manager of reader services Lynn Lobash has compiled a list of the top five psychological thrillers turned movies. So if you're in the mood to be freaked out and "Gone Girl" is checked out, try one of these on for size.

Movie Review: The Two Faces of January -- Peeling the Onion

Marshall Fine | Posted 11.25.2014 | Entertainment
Marshall Fine

Based on a novel by Patricia Highsmith, The Two Faces of January is a movie that sheds layers like an onion, gradually revealing the dark heart at its core.

Strangers on a Train

Francis Levy | Posted 05.04.2014 | Arts
Francis Levy

Coleridge famously scribbled "the motive-hunting ofmotiveless Malignity" about Othello in his copy of Shakespeare's works. Bruno Anthony (Robert Walke...

First Nighter: In London With "Strangers on a Train," "Arturo Ui," "Barking in Essex"

David Finkle | Posted 01.25.2014 | Arts
David Finkle

London--Perhaps it has everything to do with what you choose to see, but right now in London there's a strong sense of déjà vu--a sizable helping of...

Cate Blanchett's New Love Interest

Posted 08.29.2013 | Entertainment

Any actor or actress who turns down the opportunity to star as Cate Blanchett's love interest is a mystery to us, so count Mia Wasikowska as the newes...

Flashback Friday: How Gay Is 'The Talented Mr. Ripley'?

The Huffington Post | Christopher Rudolph | Posted 02.02.2016 | Queer Voices

It's been 14 years since the talented Tom Ripley chased after Dickie Greenleaf (dreamy Jude Law) in the 1999 film "The Talented Mr. Ripley," based on ...

PHOTOS: 9 Reasons Why You Should Use a Pseudonym

Carmela Ciuraru | Posted 08.20.2011 | Books
Carmela Ciuraru

It's true that George Eliot and Charlotte Bronte used male pen names so that their work would be taken seriously (and so they could publish at all).

The Talented Miss Highsmith: The Worst Person Who Ever Lived Makes for a Great Biography

Jesse Kornbluth | Posted 05.25.2011 | Books
Jesse Kornbluth

She drank a quart of gin a day. She considered robbery worse than murder. No wonder Joan Schenkar begins The Talented Miss Highsmith: The Secret Life and Serious Art of Patricia Highsmith like this: "She wasn't nice."