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Salvador Allende

El Tanquetazo -- Chile's Failed Coup

ADST | Posted 11.10.2016 | Home
ADST

In the early '70s, Chile was in a state of political unrest -- its socialist president Salvador Allende and largely conservative congress were at odds, and by June 1973, the Chilean Armed Forces were plotting against the Allende government.

10 Things I Learned About Isabel Allende

Elizabeth Ann Thompson | Posted 01.13.2015 | San Francisco
Elizabeth Ann Thompson

I learned that Chilean American author Isabel Allende will receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, our nation's highest civilian honor. Here are 10 things I learned about Isabel Allende.

The New Venezuela: An Interview With Supreme Court Justice Fernando Vegas

Dan Kovalik | Posted 11.09.2014 | Home
Dan Kovalik

Justice Vegas is optimistic about Venezuela's future and believes that the democratic process began by Hugo Chavez 15 years ago will continue and grow.

An Heir to the Chilean Presidency: Isabel Allende Bussi

Gary Villablanca Duff | Posted 09.27.2014 | Home
Gary Villablanca Duff

There are few female politicians of prominence within Chile, and yet Isabel Allende Bussi has found herself in the country's most powerful political position second only to President Michelle Bachelet.

Chile's Election: A Referendum on Pinochet

Gary Villablanca Duff | Posted 02.17.2014 | Home
Gary Villablanca Duff

This year's presidential election in Chile marks not only the return to leftist policies, but also stands as a powerful symbol of reflection on the 17-year dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet.

Chilean Chronicles, Part 9: Hernan Gutierrez´s Memory and Imagination

Jeff Kelly Lowenstein | Posted 02.04.2014 | Home
Jeff Kelly Lowenstein

Imagine that you're in Santiago, Chile in 1973.

The Writing on the Wall

Rodrigo Ribera D'Ebre | Posted 02.05.2014 | Home
Rodrigo Ribera D'Ebre

The writing on the walls in Los Angeles was the same in Santiago; the trajectory of suppression, pain, and suffering, existed everywhere and nobody had been spared the shame.

Forty Years After "The Other September 11," Much of Allende's Dream Has Come True

Mark Weisbrot | Posted 11.13.2013 | Home
Mark Weisbrot

The 40th anniversary of the "other September 11" was not a big deal in the U.S. media, except for the more open-minded news outlets like Democracy Now...

Chilean Chronicles, Part III: Visiting La Chascona

Jeff Kelly Lowenstein | Posted 10.19.2013 | Home
Jeff Kelly Lowenstein

If there was ever any shred of a doubt that Pablo Neruda, nee Neftalí Ricardo Reyes, lived an epic, fantastical life, it can be permanently eradicated by visiting La Chascona in Santiago's Bellavista neighborhood.

Pablo Neruda and The Perilous Andes

Terence Clarke | Posted 06.12.2013 | Home
Terence Clarke

The news that the Chilean government has exhumed Pablo Neruda's remains, to determine whether or not his death was caused by poisoning, brings a new, but not surprising, twist to Neruda's life, even forty years after his demise.

Hugo Chávez and Victor Hugo

Norman MacAfee | Posted 05.08.2013 | Home
Norman MacAfee

I knew that Gore had seen the musical of Les Misérables with his sister, who was dying of cancer. I knew that Chávez's favorite book was Les Misérables. So I put the two men together.

No Didn't Win the Best Foreign Film Oscar, But It's the Most Fun

Jesse Kornbluth | Posted 04.28.2013 | Home
Jesse Kornbluth

No, Chile's first-ever nominee for Best Foreign film, was never going to be playing in the sixplex next to Die Hard: The Reunion Tour. But when it didn't win the Academy Award, there went the possibility that Americans will even know it exists. Let's correct that here.

Cinema As Historical Conscience: Post-Mortem Final Screenings In NYC Today (VIDEO)

Michael Vazquez | Posted 06.24.2012 | Home
Michael Vazquez

I'm re-posting this review from NYFF#48 to earnestly remind fans of engagé cinema that today is their last chance to screen Post-Mortem, an essential, unflinching meditation on Chile's semi-recent history -- and by extension, its (and our own) ongoing internal reckoning.

Salvador Allende Has Words for Barack Obama From the Other Side of Death

Ariel Dorfman | Posted 12.10.2011 | Home
Ariel Dorfman

For the last decade, I have been haunted by voices from the other side of death. Salvador Allende came to me offering advice for Barack Obama. It seemed, at first glance, a strange connection.

38 Years Since the Attack on La Moneda: A Witness

Nestor Fantini | Posted 11.11.2011 | Home
Nestor Fantini

"Before dying, according to Dr. Quijon, the last person to see him alive, the president yelled: 'Allende does not surrender, milicos de mierda!'"

On Lincoln Center's Latinbeat: The Death of Pinochet

Michael Vazquez | Posted 10.11.2011 | Home
Michael Vazquez

For most Americans, it may be hard to believe there is another nation on Earth for whom 9/11 is a defining day -- but to Chileans, it is, and was so, long before ours. In fact, Chile's 9/11 occurred with the aid of unseen US influence facilitating a bloody military coup d'etat.

Was Pablo Neruda Murdered?

John Lundberg | Posted 08.03.2011 | Home
John Lundberg

Pablo Neruda once wrote, "We all arrive by different streets, by unequal languages, at Silence." But just how the great poet arrived at his ultimate silence is the subject of heated debate in his home country, Chile.

Phil Ochs, Tom Paine, And There But for Fortune

Bruce E. Levine | Posted 05.25.2011 | Home
Bruce E. Levine

The afterlife of the man once called "Tom Paine with a guitar" has, for the last 30 years, paralleled that of Tom Paine himself. Both Ochs and Paine were discarded by their respective mainstream worlds.

Phil Ochs: There But for Fortune -- New Documentary Opens in Los Angeles

Michael Rose | Posted 05.25.2011 | Los Angeles
Michael Rose

Kennedy's assassination, the ongoing turmoil of resistance to integration and the escalation of the Vietnam War gave the singers a new identity. At the center of the storm was Phil Ochs.

The Shadow of What We Were by Luis Sepulveda

Nina Sankovitch | Posted 05.25.2011 | Home
Nina Sankovitch

Set in Chile decades after Pinochet's bloody 1973 coup, The Shadow of What We Were by Luis Sepulveda is an exquisite, deeply affecting story of old friendships, long-tested loyalties, and undeniable bonds.

Henry Kissinger: Moral Midget Destined for Obscurity

Bruce Fein | Posted 05.25.2011 | Home
Bruce Fein

At key points in his ego-driven career, Henry Kissinger was confronted with a choice between power and moral principle. He chose power, and became a moral dwarf.

WikiLeaks Exposes More Than Documents

Joseph A. Palermo | Posted 05.25.2011 | Home
Joseph A. Palermo

Rather than focus on the substance of the leaked diplomatic cables, American journalists tend to either frame the story as being about the "over-classification" of documents or the personal motivations and private life of Julian Assange.

Stone's Border Shows Fall of South America's Berlin Wall

Robert Naiman | Posted 05.25.2011 | Home
Robert Naiman

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In Business and Speaking, Silence Can Be Golden

Tim Berry | Posted 05.25.2011 | Home
Tim Berry

I've often seen how silence can work as a tool. As you talk with somebody, and particularly in negotiations, use this to your favor. Take your time.

Memorial for Social Activist Betty Millard (1911-2010)

Jim Luce | Posted 05.25.2011 | New York
Jim Luce

Betty Millard of Chicago, a long-time social activist had danced with Zhou Enlai after the Chinese Revolution and then was called to testify as a host...