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Science Reporting

The Crisis in Squishy Science: Trouble for Scientists and for Journalists

Bella DePaulo | Posted 04.22.2013 | Media
Bella DePaulo

The squishy sciences are great at generating findings that are exciting and counter-intuitive. Journalists love those results.

Baloney Science in The New York Times

Dan Agin | Posted 01.27.2013 | Science
Dan Agin

It's unfortunate when the supposed "newspaper of record," The New York Times, presents the public with errors of interpretation and fact in a special section of the newspaper devoted to science: the so-called Science Times.

Eat Less, Live More? Science, the Media and Health Behavior

Joseph F. Coughlin | Posted 09.26.2012 | Science
Joseph F. Coughlin

Science, in the media and in public discussion, means that anything that runs counter to the dominant myth of how science is done and how knowledge is generated is subject to public question at best, and more often harsh criticism or humor.

What the Akin Incident Can Teach the Media About Science and Climate Change Reporting

Josh Garrett | Posted 10.22.2012 | Media
Josh Garrett

I urge the American media to take this lesson away from the Akin fiasco: include scientific fact in your reporting whenever it is part of the story, and don't be afraid to identify statements as incorrect.

And The 'Worst Science Article' Prize Goes To...

Posted 02.22.2012 | Science

The folks at the Daily Mail are big fans of science, regularly covering cutting-edge research from universities in the UK and abroad. But do scientist...

Darwin Was Not Wrong--New Study Being Distorted

Steven Newton | Posted 05.25.2011 | Technology
Steven Newton

Science fares poorly in the media. Most news outlets devote little attention to scientific topics, and if they do have a website with a science sectio...

New York Times Stands in Solidarity with Washington Post

A. Siegel | Posted 05.25.2011 | Green
A. Siegel

We have to ask ourselves why theoretically serious newspapers hand over precious (and it is precious) column inches to such serial deceivers as John Tierney and George Will.