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Shale Gas Bubble

Drilling Deeper: New Report Casts Doubt on Fracking Production Numbers

Steve Horn | Posted 12.27.2014 | Green
Steve Horn

By calculating the production numbers on a well-by-well basis for shale gas and tight oil fields throughout the U.S., Post Carbon concludes that the future of fracking is not nearly as bright as industry cheerleaders suggest.

Revealed: Former Energy in Depth Spokesman John Krohn Now at EIA Promoting Fracking

Steve Horn | Posted 07.23.2014 | Green
Steve Horn

For those familiar with U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) work, objectivity and commitment to fact based on statistics come to mind.

Obama's Former PR Flack: Thread Tying Keystone XL, PA Gov's Race Together

Steve Horn | Posted 10.16.2013 | Green
Steve Horn

Pennsylvania Democratic Party gubernatorial candidate and former head of the PA Department of Environmental Protection, Kathleen "Katie" McGinty, has hired powerful PR firm SKDKnickerbocker for her campaign's communications efforts.

Interview: Energy Investor Bill Powers Discusses Looming Shale Gas Bubble

Steve Horn | Posted 07.08.2013 | Green
Steve Horn

The well production data that Powers picked through on a state-by-state basis demonstrates a "drilling treadmill." That means each time an area is fracked, after the frackers find the "sweet spot," that area yields diminishing returns on gas production on a monthly and annual basis.

Reports: Shale Gas Bubble Looms, Aided by Wall Street

Steve Horn | Posted 04.22.2013 | Green
Steve Horn

Two long-awaited reports were published today at ShaleBubble.org by the Post Carbon Institute (PCI) and the Energy Policy Forum (EPF). Together, the reports conclude that the hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") boom could lead to a "bubble burst" akin to the housing bubble burst of 2008.

Shale Gas Bubble: Insiders Suggest Fracking Boom Is a Bust

Brendan DeMelle | Posted 03.12.2012 | Green
Brendan DeMelle

The New York Times and now Bloomberg have both exposed the fact that the economics of risky and expensive unconventional gas recovery simply don't match up with industry geologists' claims of a "nearly limitless" supply.