iOS app Android app

Statisticians

Being SMART about Constructing Dynamic Treatment Regimes

American Statistical Association | Posted 05.14.2014 | Science
American Statistical Association

By Susan Murphy and Inbal Nahum-Shani Dynamic treatment regimes (DTRs) are of growing interest across the medical field as these regimes provide a wa...

WANTED: Neuro-quants

American Statistical Association | Posted 10.13.2013 | Science
American Statistical Association

It is a wonderful time--in the midst of a data revolution--to be a biostatistician. Quantitative neuroscience provides the opportunity for statisticians to be at the forefront of the most exciting challenge in science today by providing the critical skills needed to address it properly.

Statistical Thinking: The Bedrock of Data Science

American Statistical Association | Posted 09.25.2013 | Science
American Statistical Association

It is true that the tactics for managing and analyzing Big Data are changing and improving, but the strategies for working with Big Data, as well as small data, are still based on a rock-solid foundation of good statistical thinking.

Leave Election Integrity to Chance

American Statistical Association | Posted 09.11.2013 | Politics
American Statistical Association

Even if we count votes by hand, there will be mistakes. How can we have confidence in the results?

Sorting the Wheat from the Chaff: How Do We Know Which Cancer Therapies Really Work?

American Statistical Association | Posted 08.12.2013 | Science
American Statistical Association

How do we know which newly touted treatments really work (i.e., are safe and effective) and which do not? The best way, and one that has led to steady progress in the treatment of many types of cancer in recent decades, is through the randomized controlled clinical trial.

Scientists Beware: Shooting the Messenger

American Statistical Association | Posted 07.30.2013 | Science
American Statistical Association

While every scientist faces the possibility of being the bearer of bad news, statisticians are especially vulnerable. At present, two countries -- Greece and Argentina -- are bringing charges against statisticians who are reporting truthful, yet unpleasant, data.

New Treatments, Your Health and Statistics

Marie Davidian | Posted 05.15.2013 | Science
Marie Davidian

Statisticians and statistics are even more fundamental in this era of personalized medicine, as sponsors seek to target treatment to patients most likely to benefit and develop "adaptive" study designs to identify these patients sooner.

2013: The International Year of... Statistics

Marie Davidian | Posted 04.14.2013 | Science
Marie Davidian

Times have changed. From Google chief economist Hal Varian's well-circulated 2009 quote in The New York Times that "the sexy job in the next 10 years will be statisticians" to the assertions of numerous blog posts and articles, statistics is "hot."

Unemployment 'Math': Statistical Lies

Iris Mack | Posted 05.25.2011 | Business
Iris Mack

Parents need to demand that their children learn math. Math literate citizens can will use analytical reasoning to see through the lies of government and the ridiculous insults from the mainstream media.

Global Warming Is Real: Statisticians Reject Global Cooling Claims

AP | SETH BORENSTEIN | Posted 05.25.2011 | Home

WASHINGTON — Have you heard that the world is now cooling instead of warming? You may have seen some news reports on the Internet or heard about it from a provocative new book.

Only one problem: It's not true, according to several independent statisticians who analyzed temperature data for The Associated Press.

The case that the Earth might be cooling partly stems from recent weather. Last year was cooler than previous years. It's been a while since the super-hot years of 1998 and 2005. So is this a longer climate trend or just weather's normal ups and downs?

In a blind test, the AP gave temperature data to four independent statisticians and asked them to look for trends, without telling them what the numbers represented. The experts found no true temperature declines over time.

"If you look at the data and sort of cherry-pick a micro-trend within a bigger trend, that technique is particularly suspect," said John Grego, a professor of statistics at the University of South Carolina.