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Teenage Brain

It Ended Before It Began: Criminalizing a Young Brain

Merritt Juliano | Posted 09.24.2015 | Healthy Living
Merritt Juliano

Trying to identify those circumstances where an 18- to 25-year-old might fairly be treated as a juvenile, difficult though it may be, should be a priority for a modern society, particularly for non-violent offenders with a low outlook for recidivism.

ICYMI: The Science Behind Why We Watch Cat Videos And An Argument For Sleeping Alone

The Huffington Post | Erin Schumaker | Posted 06.29.2015 | Healthy Living

ICYMI Health features what we're reading this week. This week, we took a close look at the inner workings of the brain. We validated our cat video...

Juvenile Justice Reform in NY State: Raise the Age

Catharine Hill | Posted 06.16.2015 | New York
Catharine Hill

As educators, we understand the benefits of letting young people learn from their mistakes. By incarcerating them as adults, we set them on a path that makes further education almost impossible, condemns them to a dismal future and costs society significantly more than evidence-based diversion practices.

Carolyn Gregoire

Why Are Teens So Moody And Impulsive? This Neuroscientist Has The Answer | Carolyn Gregoire | Posted 06.16.2015 | Science

Parents often complain their teenagers are moody, impulsive and self-centered -- but it may not be their fault. The secret to understanding tee...

EVIL TEENS: Irony, Prison Make-Up and Other Horrifying Truths about Teenage Life in America

Malina Saval | Posted 07.30.2012 | Parents
Malina Saval

In a classroom, a group of eighth graders dressed in skinny jeans, shrunken cardigans and obscure indie rock band tees gather together. Their teacher flips open her laptop to take notes.

Why Teens Love Sex, Speed & Danger — And Why It's A Good Thing

Posted 01.04.2012 | Science

Why do some teens drive fast, drink too much and obsess about their social lives? The traditional narrative has been that teens' brains are a work in ...

5 Myths About The Teenage Brain

David Moshman | Posted 07.17.2011 | Healthy Living
David Moshman

A 2006 cartoon in The New Yorker shows parents ordering their adolescent son to go to his room until his cerebral cortex matures. This nicely illustrates how we have come to think about adolescents.