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The New Yorker

Chilean Chronicles, Part 12: Returning Home to Chicago

Jeff Kelly Lowenstein | Posted 03.02.2014 | Travel
Jeff Kelly Lowenstein

Our view as we approach O'Hare. Photo by Jeff Kelly Lowenstein We're in the air from Toronto to Chicago. We've left Santiago, site of fulfilled d...

Pope Francis, Man of the Year? Not Yet

Michele Somerville | Posted 02.19.2014 | Religion
Michele Somerville

Pope Francis may well be what he seems but it can not be denied that this pope is made-to-order. It is only by cutting through the 'spin' that we can know how genuine Francis and the change with which he being credited actually are.

Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Living Pioneer Journalist

Molly Alexander Darden | Posted 02.11.2014 | Books
Molly Alexander Darden

Charlayne just knew she was going to be a reporter like Brenda Starr, her hero in the comic books. Never mind that Brenda was a red-haired white girl. Never mind that most people, except her mother and grandmother, thought she didn't have a chance in the world of accomplishing that.

Dorothy Parker Happy in Los Angeles

Kevin Fitzpatrick | Posted 02.05.2014 | Books
Kevin Fitzpatrick

Today there is only one spot in Los Angeles that remembers Dorothy Parker's 30 years as a resident.

The Vexed Jazz-Age Relationship of The New Yorker and F. Scott Fitzgerald

Anne Margaret Daniel | Posted 02.04.2014 | Books
Anne Margaret Daniel

Today we are well accustomed to having some of the most enduring names in American letters long associated with The New Yorker: John Updike, appearing there for nearly sixty years; E. B. White; James Thurber; John Cheever; Rachel Carson; John McPhee; and many more. However, The New Yorker was a newcomer in 1925.

November Days of Drums

Michael Winship | Posted 01.25.2014 | Politics
Michael Winship

While many will recall the sound of muffled drums as Kennedy's horse-drawn funeral caisson was moved through the streets of Washington, I'll remember Friday, 2 p.m., and the echo of drums in a dark and empty school auditorium.

Are Cities Like San Francisco And Boston Becoming 'Manhattanized'?

www.newyorker.com | Posted 12.28.2013 | Hawaii

In the past, a city was said to have "Manhattanized" when it bulldozed old storefronts to make room for dense clusters of commercial skyscrapers: thin...

Proof That Boredom Isn't As Bad As Your Parents Always Told You

Posted 11.07.2013 | Healthy Living

City-dwellers (especially New Yorkers) tend to pride themselves on their jadedness. A blasé, don't-know-don't-care attitude allows them to walk by va...

First Nighter: When Irish Eyes Aren't Smiling in Sean O'Casey and Maeve Brennan

David Finkle | Posted 12.20.2013 | Arts
David Finkle

Charlotte Moore as artistic director and Ciarán O'Reilly as producing director at the Irish Repertory Theatre form one of the most reliable teams in New York City, and if they aren't regularly celebrated, they should be.

On Teaching the Work of Alice Munro

Daniel Pena | Posted 01.23.2014 | Books
Daniel Pena

Alice Munro's writing, like all great writing, teaches us to be human. It engages big questions in small spaces: What does it mean to be regional? What does it mean to be Canadian? What does it mean to be a mother? What does it mean to be betrayed?

Lulu: The Cat The New Yorker Left Behind

Lois Metzger | Posted 01.23.2014 | Books
Lois Metzger

I didn't get many "Talk" stories into the magazine, so this was a big moment. But it always troubled me that Lulu, the third cat Carole and I went to see, never made it into The New Yorker.

John O'Hara and F. Scott Fitzgerald

Anne Margaret Daniel | Posted 11.16.2013 | Books
Anne Margaret Daniel

O'Hara's admiration for Fitzgerald's first novel This Side of Paradise is well documented -- he fell in love with the book, that's how he put it. It's not surprising to find Fitzgerald the author he had to copy, and try to surmount.

Egon Finney, Rin Tin Tin, Scott Fitzgerald, and Water-Skiing, 1928

Anne Margaret Daniel | Posted 11.13.2013 | Books
Anne Margaret Daniel

Egon Finney is a Jazz Age celebrity no one has noticed since his lifetime, but who is surely as interesting as many of his human contemporaries -- and far more interesting than many of them.

My Dear God, Make It Clean: Confession and Psalm 51

Rev. Peter M. Wallace | Posted 11.13.2013 | Religion
Rev. Peter M. Wallace

God can renew and refurbish our spirits, our hearts, our drive, our attitudes. God can give us a positive, willing, and steadfast spirit to live and learn from mistakes and to change direction. Yes, God can.

This Is By Far The Smartest Piece Ever Written On Obama And The Civil Rights Movement

The Huffington Post | Posted 08.29.2013 | Politics

Exactly half a century after Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream" speech, President Barack Obama stood on the same spot on th...

The Mexicanadian Threat

Francis Levy | Posted 10.21.2013 | Comedy
Francis Levy

European and Middle Eastern countries are often bounded by hostile neighbors. The Battle of Britain was a turning point in the Second World War. Yet ...

How to Have Pop Culture Savvy in College

Jake Perlman | Posted 10.19.2013 | College
Jake Perlman

The entertainment world continues rotating and while you are stuck in the four year college bubble, it may be hard to pop back and keep tabs on upcoming movie releases, new TV shows, or which Kardashian is pregnant and/or getting a divorce.

'No Sympathy For The King, Huh?'

The New Yorker | Posted 07.30.2013 | Black Voices

Considering how American the feeling is, there should be a word in English for the despair that attends our moments of racial atomization. Every few y...

What I Learned From My Elders

Brenda Peterson | Posted 09.16.2013 | Fifty
Brenda Peterson

All my life, I've instinctively sought out elders. I longed for their patient, thoughtful scrutiny -- to be truly seen by someone who is wise. Someone who is critically detached, perceptive and yet very fond.

Are Superhero Movies Serious?

Aaron Strumwasser | Posted 09.11.2013 | Entertainment
Aaron Strumwasser

Moviegoers over 13 years old seem to have stopped going to superhero movies for fantasy and started going for psychological realism.

At the Vatican Noir: UN Seeking Disclosure of Thousands of Pedophile Cases Related to Clergy

Alison Winfield Burns | Posted 09.09.2013 | World
Alison Winfield Burns

The United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) will investigate widespread sexual assault against children by Catholic clergy. "We ...

Book Review: Difficult Men

Phil Simon | Posted 08.30.2013 | Books
Phil Simon

I'm a huge fan of Breaking Bad, The Sopranos, and other long-form dramas about morally complicated characters. Against that backdrop, I couldn't wait...

Sergey Brin Is Force Behind Google's Showdown with China, Ken Auletta

Andy Plesser | Posted 06.10.2013 | Technology
Andy Plesser

Google co-founder Sergey Brin, the son of persecuted Russian Jews, has been the driving force in the the company's showdown with China, says Ken A...

New Yorker TV Critic Emily Nussbaum on 'The Interview Show'

Mark Bazer | Posted 08.03.2013 | Entertainment
Mark Bazer

Emily Nussbaum, The New Yorker's TV critic, came on The Interview Show, hosted by Mark Bazer, to talk her love for Enlightened, the plight of the netw...

The Audacity of Thought: Film Director Margarethe von Trotta Examines the Life of a Passionate Intellectual in Hannah Arendt

Penelope Andrew | Posted 08.03.2013 | Entertainment
Penelope Andrew

Thinking and smoking. Smoking and thinking. Thinking, smoking, and pacing the floor of her apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side. This is how we see the gifted academic and profound socio-political philosopher, Hannah Arendt, prepare to write.