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Maryland She-roes

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 03.22.2015 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

Harriet Tubman was born a slave on Maryland's Eastern Shore. In 1849, when she was about 30, her owner died. Believing she was going to be sold, she escaped and made her way to Philadelphia.

Artistic Women

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 03.02.2015 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

Cassatt focused on the private and social lives of women and children, often painting mothers and their children together.

Oh, Baby!

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 02.01.2015 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

The woman who advocated for 50 years for newborn hearing screening, died -- after seeing the screening she advocated for implemented for almost every infant born in a hospital in the U.S. I started thinking about women whose accomplishments helped improve the health of newborns.

Windy City She-roes

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 01.26.2015 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

Growing up on the south side of Chicago, Gwendolyn Brooks read and wrote as a child. Her first poem was published when she was 14 years old. She attended college but could not find suitable work during the Depression

Women's Firsts in the Big Apple

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 09.19.2015 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

When Joan Ganz Cooney decided to start the Children's Television Workshop, she was told that she could be the deputy, but that a man should be in charge. Her response was that if a man were in charge, she would not be involved

Keystone State She-roes

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 01.10.2015 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

My travel last week took me to Pennsylvania, The Keystone State. Many strong and accomplished women are affiliated with this state that was one of the 13 original colonies

National Medalists

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 12.14.2014 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

Yvonne C. Brill received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Obama in October 2011 "for innovation in rocket propulsion systems for geosynchronous." Other women have received these medals, also for groundbreaking accomplishments.

How the Cookie Crumbles

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 09.19.2015 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

In 1896, Fannie Farmer published her cookbook, The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, which revolutionized cooking. This was the first cookbook to incorporate accurate measurements for the recipes, which made them possible to replicate.

Necessity Is the Mother of Invention

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 10.15.2014 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

Women used to wear corsets under their dresses which were very heavy, required assistance for dressing, and permanently altered the locations of a woman's organs. Bloomer advocated for a looser top, a skirt that stopped at the knee, with a pair of pants worn under the skirts.

You're Never Too Old to Leave a Legacy

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 09.16.2014 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

You think that you are too old to leave a legacy? Think again. Take inspiration from Anna Mary Robertson Moses. Grandma Moses, as she was called, was ...

Hockey Sticks, Curling Stones, Broken Bones

Jill S. Tietjen | Posted 05.02.2014 | Women
Jill S. Tietjen

Dr. Gloria Beim stands on the shoulders of those women in the medical profession who came before her. Let's discover some of those pioneering women.

The Pithy Tale of Owney

Maggie Van Ostrand | Posted 10.19.2011 | Home
Maggie Van Ostrand

2011-08-19-owney.JPG There is no proof that Owney helped railroad's mail personnel sort the mail while in transit, becoming the fastest sorter of all time, but there's no proof that he didn't.