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Beyond Typical Resource Guarding

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We've all heard about dogs who guard their food, or perhaps treats or toys. But there are some dogs from whom resource guarding goes beyond the norm, and seems to be an art form. Here are just a few examples:

1. Guarding people: Most dogs in this category guard their owners. At the dog park, I've watched dogs spend the entire time running at and fending off dogs who come anywhere in the vicinity of the owner. The owner believes he or she is doing a good thing by bringing the dog to the park for exercise and socialization. In reality, the dog is in a constant state of stressful arousal. After all, when vigilantly guarding a valued resource, who could relax? Unfortunately, some owners find this sort of behavior admirable, in a "Look, my dog is protecting me" kind of way.

I can always count on Sierra to add something strange and different to typical behavior. When I first got Sierra, I'd allow her to go greet dogs and owners in the dog park if there were only one or two inside. Here's a typical scenario: There's a nice Australian shepherd mix, and her owner, who is sitting on a bench. I open the gate. Sierra immediately runs up to the owner, hops up beside him, and begins her wiggly, flirtatious, pet-me routine. Fair enough. But, when the Aussie approaches Sierra guards the dog from her own owner! Needless to say, this is not something I let to continue to happen, but it certainly was interesting.

2. Guarding other dogs: Imagine two dogs romping happily. A third dog approaches, and suddenly a skirmish breaks out, as one of the previously romping dogs drives the interloper away. "Isn't that nice? He's protecting his friend," says the owner. Not so much. If the dog could speak, he'd be saying, "Go find your own friend. This one is mine!" This dynamic isn't uncommon when two dogs who live together come to the park, where one turns on the other to guard a valued newcomer from the housemate.

3. Guarding locations: This isn't all that uncommon. When there are two or more
dogs in the house, often one will lie across a doorway that leads to a room or to the outdoors, in order to controlling access to the area. Before the other dog can pass, he's got to get past the Club Canine bouncer. Some dogs will even do this with their owners. In those cases, many owners will step over their dogs, while others will get the dog out of the way by calling the dog to them. I recommend the latter, or simply teaching a "Move!" cue.

4. Guarding from afar: This is one that sometimes goes unnoticed or is misunderstood by owners. In this case, the valued item is not even in the dog's possession. Some dogs, for example, will stand near the kitchen table while the owners are eating, glaring at the other dog. They might well have never been fed from the table; it's as though they're just waiting for a tasty morsel to fall. And if it does, whose will it be? Yep.

5. Just plain weirdness: There are dogs who will guard their own leashes. I've
known dogs who have resource guarded dust balls. (Good thing they don't live at my house.) And, while it's unpleasant, some dogs have even been known to guard their own feces or vomit. (No, really, it's yours, you keep it.) But the prize for the oddest guarding behavior goes to... Sierra! In the mornings when I make my green smoothie drink, I give them Bodhi and Sierra each a small piece of banana before it goes into the blender. Each dog will quickly eat their portion. Sierra will then walk up to Bodhi and begin to lick the remnants of banana from his lips and, if he opens up, the inside of his mouth. If he doesn't allow it, she may growl. Yes, friends, Sierra is actually guarding the food that is in Bodhi's mouth from him. That's a new one on me.

Your turn: What sorts of odd things do your dogs guard?

Nicole Wilde is a canine behavior specialist and author. Visit her website nicolewilde.com.
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