THE BLOG
01/23/2013 03:23 pm ET Updated Mar 25, 2013

Django Unchained Actor Unwittingly Gives Tips on How to Manifest

I recently heard Christoph Waltz interviewed by Terry Gross on Fresh Air. He plays a German dentist turned bounty hunter in Django Unchained, Quentin Tarantino's new film. During pre-production, he was bucked off a horse and sent to the hospital with a broken pelvis. As he explained to Gross:

The first time I've been on a horse is probably 40 years ago ... Riding is something that in order to master it you have to do it like playing an instrument ... You have to do it every day, and you have to do it over a long period of time.

And that's the perfect description of how you learn to manifest. Instead of focusing on "what you see," practice focusing on "what you want." Over and over and over again. Yes, you will get bucked off the horse. Yes, you'll hit the ground of your apparent lack, dislocate the pelvis of your negativity. But just keep climbing back into that saddle and focusing on what you want to be true.

Left to its own devices, the human mind is quick to jump to conclusions, leap toward fear and cower in the face of possibilities. That's why I've made "training my mind" priority numero uno. On a daily basis, I instruct it to look for beauty. Encourage it to seek out the bigger picture, to focus on the love and the seemingly impossible.

Yes, it's an incorrigible slacker. Keeps returning to familiar old ruts. Keeps listening to the spin doctor that looks at the world as a potentially scary place. Insists on focusing on the "information" from my five senses, from the news media, from the default setting that says, "Be careful. Worry. Don't even think about learning to trust."

So I just keep getting back up in the saddle, directing my mind to focus on what I know to be Truth.

When I share my intention of "unceasing joy," people sometimes ask me, "How is that even possible?" When the "what you see" looms so large in your mind.

And all I can say is it's the same as the answer to the old joke, "How do you get to Carnegie Hall?"

Practice, practice, practice.

Or, if you're Quentin Tarantino, you can take your character off the horse that caused the accident in the first place. When the Oscar-winning director went to visit Waltz in the hospital, and found out he couldn't ride a horse for three months, he wisely said, "You know, if you don't talk too much about it, I might get some interesting ideas."

And that's exactly what he did. Waltz's character, Dr. King Schultz, rides around in a hilarious horse-drawn buggy with a giant tooth swinging from its hinges.

So, quit talking about the "world as it seems," get back up in that horse-drawn carriage and use your imagination to take you all the way to a happier, more beautiful reality.

Pam Grout is the author of E-Squared, 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality.

Subscribe to the Lifestyle email.
Life hacks and juicy stories to get you through the week.