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Pay it Forward!

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Our energy fields can interact with a computer touch screen. They can interact with other fields of energy, including those of other people.

A Mood Can Spread

You walk into a room in one of the best moods you've had in a long time, and you can feel it. Something's wrong. Someone in that room is in such a bad mood that he's bringing everyone down just by his presence. Suddenly your mood evaporates, and you still aren't sure why. Your step becomes heavier, and your mood sinks as you step as if through a mine field to join the others there in the same collective mood.

On the other hand, there are certain people that can brighten a room just by walking into it. You don't see them coming in at first, but you can feel their presence. Your mood lifts, and you just know who it must be. Then they smile and you forget why you were feeling so bad in the first place. You're in a better mood; more able to handle your problems.

In both cases, you have interacted with another without having touched or gone physically near them. No contact at all other than just going near. If the one lady leaves you in a brighter mood, then you will in turn spread that to the next clump of people you meet that day, just as the first guy's bad mood will leapfrog its way across town as well. Observe your mood and check yourself, pay it forward and it will come back tenfold.

There's a story about how one man lights up a city. One day, during the busy hours, two friends took a cab. After a while, one of the friends noticed the driver. He looked low and lifeless. Being somewhat frustrated, he cut through small lanes, tried overtaking other cars on busy roads, but always kept his cool. Fifteen minutes later, the friends reached their destination. One of them paid the driver with a few extra dollars. "Keep it," he said and turned to walk.

The other friend, who was observing the driver all this while, looked at him through the window and said, "Thank you for the ride. You are a great and composed driver. It normally takes much more than this to reach here, especially during that peak hour traffic!" All this while, the man had a genuine smile on his face. He was grateful. The cab driver said, "Well, uh, yeah right. No problem. Thank you." Clearly, he hadn't heard that from any other customer in NYC. Nobody looked at him in that way ever before. The driver had assumed there was nothing special about him either -- it was just a bloody job and no one gave a damn. But that day, his perception changed. Someone did care -- someone did appreciate. And it was real. There was a slight smile on his wrinkled face.

A few minutes later, the other friend asked, "What was that about?" The man replied, "Nothing. I just paid it forward and tried to make his day. I'm doing it one man at a time, friend, one man at a time." The small gesture did make the driver's day. He thanked several other customers with a genuine smile. The thanked ones in turn paid it forward while going about their normal days -- which didn't seem so normal after all.

That is the power of consciously acting on how one wants to feel. The man wanted to feel happy, so he spread happiness with gratitude. He understood how humans have the power to affect each other's moods.

So a mood can spread, but what does this have to do with our health-based topic? The answer is, "just about everything." The best way to kill a critically-sick person is to put them into a depression. A long-term bad mood can cause physical stress upon your body. I call this thinking yourself older. By observing your thoughts and remaining open, humble and choosing your state of mind wisely, you are in essence paying it forward.

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