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My Letter in Support of a Reduced Sentence for Pvt. Manning

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According to the Uniform Code of Military Justice, Convening Authorities can reduce or eliminate a convicted soldier's sentence. They use this power when they feel the court martial failed to deliver justice. As Commanding General of the Military District of Washington, Major General Jeffrey S. Buchanan is the only other individual besides President Obama (and there ain't no joy there unless Manning qualifies as a Syrian kid) with the power to lessen Pvt. Manning's sentence.

This process is not new, nor unique. Though a slightly different judicial procedure, the Air Force Court of Criminal Appeals only in June of this year reduced the sentence of a former Ramstein Air Base staff sergeant who advertised babysitting services to gain access to three young girls he repeatedly sexually assaulted. Staff Sgt. Joshua A. Smith's sentence was reduced such that Smith, 30, would be eligible for parole after a decade or more. Stars and Stripes reported:

The appellate judges, in their written opinion, said that despite the heinousness of Smith's crimes against the girls -- ages 3, 4 and 7 -- the sentence handed down in November 2010 by military judge Col. Dawn R. Eflein and approved by the Third Air Force commander was "unduly severe."

If you wish to add your voice to the many now asking for Manning's sentence to be reduced, the instructions on how to do so are straightforward.

Here is what I wrote:

Major General Jeffrey S. Buchanan
Commanding General, U.S. Army Military District of Washington, DC

General Buchanan:

I write to request that as the Convening Authority in the case of U.S. v. Bradley E. Manning you move to reduce Pvt. Manning's sentence to time served. Pvt. Manning has, in the course of several difficult years of confinement, taken responsibility for his actions and has been punished.

As the leader of a State Department Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) in Iraq, I was embedded with the 10th Mountain Division, 2nd Brigade at Forward Operating Base (FOB) Hammer at the same time Manning was deployed there (though we never met.) I worked closely with Colonel Miller and his team to implement U.S. goals, and came away with great respect for him and his officers, and the enlisted men and women of the Commandos.

At the same time, I experienced first-hand the austere conditions at FOB Hammer, and the difficult lives the soldiers led. As you are aware, one young soldier tragically took his own life early in the deployment at Hammer. Many veteran soldiers, some who served in the Balkans, also talked about the rough conditions at our FOB. I saw that at times computer security was imperfect. While none of this excuses Pvt. Manning (nor should it; he himself has plead guilty to multiple counts), it does in part help explain it. I ask that you consider these factors in your decision.

As a State Department employee, I had access to the same databases Pvt. Manning in part disclosed, and back in Washington played a small roll in State's "damage review." I thus know better than most outsiders what Pvt. Manning did and, significantly, did not disclose, and am in a position to assess dispassionately the impact. As the State Department and the DoD reluctantly concluded at Manning's trial, little if any verifiable damage was indeed done to the United States. There is no denying that the disclosures were embarrassing and awkward, but that is not worth most of a man's life.

Justice elevates us all, and reflects well on our beloved nation. The revenge inherent in a 35 year sentence against Pvt. Manning does not.

Very Respectfully,

(Signed)

Peter Van Buren