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Swedish Christian Art Exhibition Depicting Jews As Rats Should Be Canceled

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The Simon Wiesenthal Center, a leading Jewish Human Rights NGO, is calling for the canceling of a Swedish Christian Art exhibition that depicts Israelis as gun-toting rats devouring the "Holey Land" [sic] and urges authorities to investigate if government funds are being used to legitimize anti-Jewish hatred. (See the image and read a translation below.)

Animalization (depicting humans as animals) of Jews was perfected by the Nazi propaganda machine, an all-too effective way to dehumanize Jewish citizens in the eyes of their German neighbors. The propaganda of the 1930s set the stage for the murder of 6 million Jews in the 1940s. Since then, Soviet and Arab and Muslim anti-Jewish propaganda used the very same method to demonize and dehumanize Jews. Now it has surfaced in 2012 Sweden.

But the real question is what do Swedes who are not racists think? We note that the sponsoring organization provides educational assistance for "church and Society." Is mainstreaming anti-Semitism now part of their mandate?

We call on all Swedes, whatever their political views, to denounce this hate masquerading as art and join in demanding an investigation as to whether government grants directly or indirectly are being used for this presentation by the educational association BILDA for church and society, the sponsoring agency of this exhibition. Bilda reported that in 2010, more than 70 percent of its income came from grants.

Swedish anti-Semitic nationalists reproduced the BILDA's poster of the art. Here is link to the image.

Translation of Poster:
The hole(-y) land cheese, with Israeli rats eating Palestine
The exhibition is built on expressions from a journey that the artists made to Israel and the Palestinian areas in 2011.
En exhibition by Stefan Sjöblom and Larz Lindqvist
Vernissage Friday March 16, 5-8pm
The exhibition can be viewed March 16-April 10.