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Gay Spirituality and the Radical Faeries

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When developing gay life in America starts to surface in books about the era, gay spirituality will emerge as one of the more fascinating subjects. A significant new book that deals with the subject has just appeared. It is "The Fire In Moonlight: Stories from the Radical Faeries," edited by Mark Thompson, assisted by Richard Nealy and Bo Young and published by White Crane Books. The book has been nominated as one of 74 LGBT Books for Adult Readers by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Round Table of the American Library Association. Described as "the gay community's last authentic global grassroots movement," the Radical Faeries had their inception on a remote site of the American Southwest in 1979. The book honors two men who played a key pioneering role, Harry Hay and Don Kilhefner. That historic "First Spiritual Conference for Radical Faeries" gave Hay an opportunity to pronounce: "I am saying to everybody who will hear that now we must begin to maximize the differences between us." In other words, Hay was talking clearly about "shedding the ugly green frog-skin of hetero imitation." Will Roscoe, author of "The Zuni Man-Woman," which received the Margaret Mead Award of the American Anthropological Association, has written a brilliant Introduction to the new book. "Same-sex love is distinguished from heterosexual love by the sameness and equality of those it united," he says. Roscoe cites Walt Whitman as a gay teacher of primary significance. He finds that Harry Hay took Whitman's insights one step further, "giving a name to the distinct mode of awareness this love of sames and equals fosters--subject-SUBJECT consciousness." "The Fire In Moonlight" has many remarkable storytellers among its collection of authors. The book is staggering in its scope and depth. Robert Croonquist is a Founder and Program Director of Youth Arts New York. He describes in detail a Faerie Camp gathering. "We circle the grove and call out names." After many names from within the Faerie community "Others called out Marilyn Monroe, Allen Ginsberg, Judy Garland, Walt Whitman, Oscar Wilde. The young Faeries, it dawned on me, didn't know anybody who had died. I kind of felt sorry for them and kind of felt better than them. And kind of, but not really, felt they were lucky." William Stewart has embarked on a quest to connect with other gay men who share an aspiration to live together in collective commitment and consciousness. His contribution to this book is a prophetic piece entitled "Stewarding the Future: A Call for Sacred Witness." He cites "typical gay traits" as "the skills of artists, healers, tricksters, ritual makers, shamans and intermediaries between the worlds." Stewart believes that Harry Hays' assertion "that social function rather than sexual preference should be seen as the defining characteristic of our kind is as radical now as when he first conceived of it in the dark days of McCarthyism." Another contributor to the book is Allen Page who describes himself as "an intuitive spiritual counselor, channeler, teacher and gay elder." He writes: "We are fathers, artists, athletes and sissies. We do not fear gentleness and have no need to compete. We believe in the power of contradictions and the magic of laughter. That the quality of energy exchanged in lovemaking is more important than the gender of bodies." Mark Thompson poignantly pulls together a description of the historic 1979 Faerie Gathering in Arizona with his personal vision of the future:

"Music was played again and each man made an offering to a basket that was passed around: a feather from Woolworth's, a stone from the Ganges River, a lock of hair, a handwritten poem. We began to dance with the music and in a few moments noticed we were being joined in our merriment by a large horned bull. Naturally shy, the animal was drawn close in. The bull stood and watched motionless, like some ancient hieroglyphic painted on a cave wall, then he just as inexplicably vanished.

Soon, we too began to drift away into the dark chill air. None of us would ever find again this particular place of red earth that had nourished us so. But even to prompt a return would be missing the point. Our journeys as a new kind of men, having been thusly inaugurated, meant that we would have many destinations, far and wide, still to attend."


"The Fire In Moonlight: Stories from the Radical Faeries" is a boundless delight to read, a poem that stirs up magic thoughts, and a piece of history as solid as the stone Lincoln Monument.

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Radical Faeries - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia