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A Family for Manny... and the 115,000 Waiting Children in the U.S.

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Yesterday I was at a film shoot of 8 kids in the foster care system that are available for adoption. The kids range in age from 8 to 16.

The children told their stories...mind-boggling, inspiring, and more than anything, filled with hope.

Once again, I was reminded how many children are out there in our country, basically on their own, waiting for the right family to take them in and make them feel that they are as much a part of that family as anyone else. Thousands of kids, as beautiful and alike as a field of clover, and as unique as each bud reveals itself to be on closer inspection, waiting to experience the freedom and joy of giving and receiving the unconditional love most of us take for granted in our own families.

Yes, many of these children are injured by abuse and neglect, but injuries heal. Children are resilient and strong with powerful spirits. They respond when they trust they are being told the truth. These kids, still so young and unformed, will find their way in the world and thrive happily, when, to put it bluntly, they feel that somebody truly wants them.

In future blogs I will be introducing you to each of these great boys and girls.

Today, please meet Manny.
Sweet, sweet, affectionate Manny. He likes skateboarding and drawing and playing on the computer. He is learning how to catch a ball and dribble. Manny has made tremendous progress in his development with plenty of consistency and structure, and would love a family who can give him lots of individual attention and support his continued growth.
Manny is 8 years old, and cute as a bug.

For more information on Children's Action Network's film series, Change a Child's Life, featuring great kids just like Manny in need of a loving family, or to learn more about foster care adoption log on to www.childrensactionnetwork.org or call 800-525-6789.