Marginalize Mideast; End-Stage Childlessness

04/14/2015 09:54 am ET | Updated Jun 12, 2015

The metastasizing Mideast chaos and violence have shown yet again the limitations of American power there. We're backing and opposing groups in a fluctuating toxic religious, ethnic, tribal and national stew and frequently contradicting ourselves as we do.

Some neo-cons want us to go in with massive military intervention. We tried that. Now consider that the Sunni fanatics called ISIS use American weaponry captured from the Iraqi "army'' to attack "Iraq'' -- whatever that is -- an ally of longtime U.S. enemy Iran, which has joined in the melee against ISIS, even as Sunni Saudi Arabia fights its long-time foe and fellow dictatorship Shiite Iran in Yemen. And in Libya and Syria, the civil wars go on and on in permutations and combinations.

The U.S. must occasionally act quickly in the Mideast to rescue its compatriots and to protect the region's only real democracy - Israel. But after all this time, we should know that the Mideast has so much confusion, fanaticism and corruption that a heavier U.S. role won't make things better. The best we can do is to marginalize the region as much as possible, such as by reducing the importance of Mideast fossil fuel by turning more to renewable energy in America and Europe, while, yes, fracking for more gas and oil.

We must focus more on Europe, where a scary situation is much clearer. Our Mideast projects have dangerously diverted resources from countering the far greater threat to our interests posed by Vladimir Putin's mobster Russian regime.

Now that it has seized Crimea from Ukraine and occupied a big slice of the eastern part of that large democracy, Putin's fascist police state is firing off yet more threats to "protect'' ethnic Russians in what he calls "The Russian World'' (i.e., the old Soviet Empire) from bogus "persecution'' by the majority population in the Baltic States and Poland -- NATO members and democracies. Latvia is coming under particularly hard Russian pressure now. Hitler used the same strategy against Czechoslovakia with the Sudeten Germans. It's past time to re-energize NATO to thwart Russian aggression.


Regarding an April 4 New York Times story headlined "No Kids for Me, Thanks'':

My mysterious father used to say ruefully that "your friends you can pick, your family you're stuck with.'' He had five children.

From observing my childless friends, I'd say that contrary to an old social cliché, they are generally happier than those who have children - so far. A simple reason: They have more money, time and freedom to do what they want.

Arthur Stone, a professor of psychiatry at Stony Brook University who's co-authored a study comparing childless adults' happiness and those with kids told CNN: "They {parents} have higher highs. They have more joy in their lives, but also they have more stress and negative emotions as well.''
CNN said he found "little difference" between "the life satisfaction of parents and people without kids, once other factors -- such as income, education, religion and health -- were factored out.'' Yes, but how do you ''factor out'' income? Paying for children causes a lot of anxiety.
People tend to be more self-absorbed these days, and so less enthusiastic about sacrificing so much for, say, children. But this presents a problem that some childless Baby Boomers are already experiencing: Who will take care of them when they get really old? If they think that younger friends will feel as compelled to squire them through old age as their children, they're in Fantasyland.


The California dream of always-green lawns in McMansion developments in the desert is being revised as drought deepens. (Probably global warming.) The land of Silicon Valley, Cal Tech and Hollywood has more than enough intellectual firepower to address the conservation challenge. ("Dehydrated water - just add water''?) However, don't expect many new L.A. Basin golf courses. Californians will see more cactus and less lawn. Meanwhile, places with lots of fresh water -- e.g., New England and the Pacific Northwest - may now be in a better competitive position.

Regarding Golden State water-wars, see the movie "Chinatown''.

Robert Whitcomb (, a Providence-based editor and writer, is a partner at Cambridge Management Group (, a healthcare-sector consultancy, and a Fellow of the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy. He also oversees the New England Diary site ( He's a former finance editor of the International Herald Tribune and a former vice president and editorial-page editor of The Providence Journal.