THE BLOG

Needing More Than to Be Needed

04/24/2015 07:26 pm ET | Updated Jun 24, 2015
Sarah Bregel

As a mother who stays at home, works at home, wipes snotty faces and does everything else at home, on any given day, finding time to shower or go to the bathroom is a struggle. When I do, it's hurried or a spectator sport at best, a crying, massive, ridiculous meltdown in the making at worst. One baby screaming in his crib and flailing his body against the rails while his sister throws things at him or down the stairs or tries to make him dance while he protests and cries harder. Who knew peeing (or God forbid, pooping) could cause such utter chaos? People with bladder control problems and mothers (so basically, just mothers) -- that's who.

The time I have away from my children at this point in my life is very limited. It is almost nonexistent. My husband travels for his job about half the month and during that time, I am holding down the fort and sometimes unraveling, briefly, then putting myself back together before too much damage has been caused. I am always hopeful that by the end of the day, tired children will go to bed easily, sleep well and there will be a few moments in the day for me. That I will end the day on a high note, feeling like I did the best I can do and once they are tucked in my good karma will kick in and I can put my feet up. Usually, that doesn't happen, but I remain hopeful with each passing day that soon it will.

Instead, what almost always happens is some variation of the following: My daughter gets excited because she has me all to herself. There is no other adult in the kitchen to talk to and sneak glances to or to help me make dinner. Just a baby who doesn't talk and a 5-year-old who never stops talking. If my mind drifts for a moment my silence is met with "Mama!... Mama!" I love her adoration of me, but sometimes, it is suffocating and it is overwhelming, especially now that there is another tiny person to feed, clothe, bathe and put to bed, too.

She is in my lap, she is pawing at my hair, she is covering me in garments. Her tiny hands are all over my body. They are on my bare breasts, cozying up to me while the baby nurses. On my face and neck and belly. They are everywhere. They are hands that I love more than anything, but they are playing a very intrinsic part in my combustion. I grit my teeth and take deep breaths and sometimes I say, "Mommy needs some space," but more often than not those words are lost on her.

This feeling rises up in me that I can usually push away. It's just me. And it will just be me at 3 a.m. and first thing in the morning and when I'm at my breaking point. Even my breaking point doesn't matter. There is no getaway, minus when my heart-of-gold neighbor with her own small child offers to take the crying baby so I can jog out my stresses before he implodes from separation anxiety or hunger or angry-baby-itis. Or when my mother watches him while I go to a long overdue dentist appointment, settle into the chair to watch "Regis and Kelly" and feel like I'm on vacation. That is, until they tell me how pregnancy and hormones have done a number on my gums and holy hell, that hurts and why didn't I find time to come to the dentist in the last four years?

More often than not, at some point in the day that I start out having the highest hopes for, I feel completely defeated. And I ask myself "why is this so hard?"

On my husband's most recent trip, my daughter stayed home from her morning preschool due to a mild fever the night before. She'd been running circles around me all day while I tried to not picture the entire lonely week ahead of me. After hours of making dinner, begging people to eat dinner, cleaning it up, tantrums, baths, nursing, more tantrums, a teething baby who can't sleep and big kid who was enraged about it, I lost it. I yelled. I sobbed. And then my "me time" that I'd been looking forward to, instead of spending it putting up my feet, watching "The Mindy Project," I spent feeling the pangs of horrible, devastating guilt and wondering, How did I become this angry, tired, overwhelmed mom who yells? This isn't who I wanted to be. This isn't how it was supposed to be. In fact, it's the opposite of everything I wanted to be. This isn't what my motherhood was supposed to look and feel like. This is not my motherhood.

I spend almost all of my time and energy loving the shit out of my kids. Finding these little magic moments in ordinary days. Kissing dirty faces and being easy-going and making sure everyone has gotten enough hugs, kind words and discipline. And then I spend just a little bit of time wanting terribly to get away from them. Needing to get away from them. And it's not because I'm a horrible person or because I'm not enjoying motherhood as much as I should be. It's not because I'm emotionally unbalanced (well, maybe, a little). Mostly, it's because "away" doesn't exist. Breathing easy, being alone, working, writing uninterrupted by a poopy diaper, a spilled drink or getting hit in the head with a sock monkey, it's just not a part of my life. Or it's so fleeting, it's over before it started.

Even on my best day, when I'm calm, cool and collected, or do a good enough job pretending I am, by 10 p.m., sometimes earlier, I just want to curl up in bed and not be needed. I want to do a good job, not a mediocre one, on something I get paid for. I want to prioritize something that's mine, instead of always letting my work, my ambitions, my "chances" slide because there is too much else that's important. And I let that thought come in, that sounds something like "I can't see them anymore today. Not right now. Please, stay in bed. Please." And I let it wash over me and feel the enormity of the guilt that comes with it. Every ounce.

My motherhood experience is not all roses and I don't need it to be. I don't need to be told how much I will miss these times because I already know how true that is. The other day I was driving home and I started thinking about when my daughter was two with her white tuft of hair and her long eyelashes and her fearlessness. I got a tear in my eye but I couldn't finish the thought because she yelled, "Mama!... answer me!" from the backseat and then it was gone. The opportunity to reminisce, to miss something, evaporated.

The fleetingness of motherhood is with me, always. But so is knowing that I need more than simply to be needed. Part of my motherhood experience is remembering me -- the mother. And finding her and telling her she's important, too. I love my children all the time, but sometimes, I just want to miss them. I want to know what it's like to come up for air. And I want to know that that's okay.

This post was originally published on Sarah Bregel's personal blog, The Mediocre Mama. For more posts like this join her growing Facebook community or find her on Twitter @SarahBregel.