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The Best Way To Protect Against Tendon Injuries Is Not Stretching

Reuters | Reuters | April 17, 2015 | Healthy Living
By Roxanne Nelson (Reuters Health) - Tendon injuries are common in sports, and there are many schools of thought on how to avoid them. But a new analysis of past research finds that stretching doesn't help and might even raise the risk of injury for some. Shock absorbing insoles, and...

Teens Exposed To Alcohol Use In Films Were Most Likely To Have Tried It, Too

Reuters | Reuters | April 17, 2015 | Healthy Living
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - In a study of 15-year-olds in the U.K., those who had been most exposed to alcohol use in films were also most likely to have tried alcohol, and about twice as likely as the least exposed to have been binge drinking. After accounting for...

When 'Deshawn' And 'Greg' Act Out In Class, Guess Who Gets Branded A Troublemaker

Macrina Cooper-White | April 17, 2015 | Science
Research has shown that young black students in American schools are expelled and suspended three times as often as white students. Now a disturbing new study from Stanford University reveals one factor behind such disproportionate punishment. The study showed that teachers tend to view black students more harshly...

Measles Outbreak Linked To Disneyland Is Officially Over

AP | Anna Almendrala | April 17, 2015 | Healthy Living
LOS ANGELES (AP) — California health authorities on Friday declared an end to a large measles outbreak that started at Disneyland and triggered a national debate about vaccinations. Disease detectives for months raced to contain the highly contagious disease, which surfaced at Disney theme parks in December and spread to...

Changing Attitudes Spark Movement Against Intersex Surgeries For Infants & Children

AP | Anna Almendrala | April 17, 2015 | Healthy Living
CHICAGO (AP) — She was born to a young Chicago couple, named Jennifer, and grew into a beautiful long-lashed child with wavy dark hair, big brown eyes and a yearning, youthful desire to be just like all the other girls. Only she wasn't. Doctors first noticed her slightly enlarged genitals,...

Sperm Whale Delights Researchers By Crashing Underwater Video Feed

The Huffington Post | Nick Visser | April 17, 2015 | Science
"Does this count as a selfie?" Researchers working in the Gulf of Mexico were stunned earlier this week when an inquisitive sperm whale decided to crash a live stream feed, nearly 2,000 feet below the surface. The whale hung out with the remotely operated Hercules vehicle...

Teaching Kids About Sex Abuse In School Ups Reporting

Reuters | Reuters | April 17, 2015 | Politics
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Children who learn about preventing sex abuse in school more often report abuse in their own lives than do kids who are not taught about it, according to a new research review. This reinforces the findings of previous reviews, said lead author Kerryann...

These Haunting Paintings Show What Hawaii's Volcanoes Looked Like Before Color Photography

James Cave | April 17, 2015 | Arts
Jules Tavernier, "An Eruption," late 1880s We've all heard of the Hudson River School and the Barbizon School, but how about the Volcano School? In the 1880s and 1890s, Mauna Loa -- Hawaii's biggest volcano -- kicked...

Probiotics May One Day Be Used To Treat Depression

The Huffington Post | Carolyn Gregoire | April 17, 2015 | Healthy Living
What you eat can have a major impact on how you feel emotionally. A diet rich in probiotics -- which support the growth of "healthy" bacteria in the gut -- is known to boost digestive health and can even improve a person's immune system. But now an...

Gazing Into Our Dog's Eyes Releases The Cuddle Chemical

TODAY.com | Jade Walker | April 17, 2015 | Green
Read More: Dogs, Green News
Some dog owners treat their dogs like their babies. While this might seem ridiculous to some, a new study in Science proves the bond between dogs and their owners can be as emotionally strong as the connection between mothers and their children.

NASA's MESSENGER Spacecraft Is About To Crash Into Mercury

The Huffington Post | Ed Mazza | April 17, 2015 | Science
Mercury is about to get a visitor. The NASA MESSENGER spacecraft that's been orbiting Mercury and collecting data for four years is about to run out of fuel. And when it does, it's going to hit the tiny planet's surface at about 8,750 miles per...

Giant Exoplanet Discovered 13,000 Light-Years Away Is Among The Most Distant Ever Seen

The Huffington Post | Jacqueline Howard | April 16, 2015 | Science
A newly discovered alien planet is one of the most distant yet spotted. Known formally as "OGLE-2014-BLG-0124Lb," the gas giant was detected by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the OGLE Warsaw Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. It's about half as massive as Jupiter and is...

When To Get A Second Opinion On Your Test Results

Anna Almendrala | April 16, 2015 | Healthy Living
By: Rachael Rettner Published: April 15, 2015 06:49pm ET Actress Rita Wilson attributes the early diagnosis of her breast cancer to the fact that she got a second opinion, a step that experts say is particularly important when the consequences of a medical test or treatment are serious....

American With Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Probably Got It From Eating Beef Overseas A Decade Ago

Anna Almendrala | April 16, 2015 | Healthy Living
By: Rachael Rettner Published: April 15, 2015 12:00pm ET A U.S. man who developed a rare and fatal brain disease likely got the disease from eating beef while living abroad more than a decade earlier, according to a new report of the case. ...

Why Mapping Your Tumor's Genes Isn't Enough To Guide Cancer Treatment

AP | Anna Almendrala | April 16, 2015 | Healthy Living
WASHINGTON (AP) — More cancer patients are getting the genes in their tumors mapped to help guide their treatment. New research suggests that isn't always accurate enough, and a second test could help ferret out the culprit genes. Cancer involves two sets of genetic code — your own and your...

Amid Calls To Divest, Schools Explore Green Revolving Funds

Tyler Kingkade | April 16, 2015 | College
While only 22 U.S. colleges and universities have actually agreed to sell their shares in oil and coal companies, more than 50 have committed themselves to efficiency projects on campus through a special financing method called green revolving funds, including Harvard University. At Harvard this week, students, alumni and faculty have occupied administrative buildings, calling for the university to cut investments in the fossil fuel industry. Protesters are questioning how the world's wealthiest university invests its $36 billion endowment. Climate activist Wen Stephenson is among those camping out, hoping to draw attention to climate change and the extraction of fossil fuels. "If we are serious about the climate catastrophe that is upon us, then that oil and gas has to stay in the ground," Stephenson shouted during a rally in front of Massachusetts Hall. At the same time, there's a quieter movement gaining steam, one that's focused instead on taking spaces like Harvard's Northwest Lab Building and making sure they're as energy efficient as possible -- reducing the school's carbon footprint and lowering the energy bill. Tom Tribble shows the small design that made it possible to reduce energy use at Harvard's Northwest Lab building. (Mallory Noe-Payne/WGBH). A Project on Campus Here's the thing about energy efficiency: It's not sexy. A lot of the time, it's not even visible. Instead, it's hidden away inside walls and down in basements. "I used to think of buildings the way you think of a human body," said Tom Tribble, senior facilities manager at Harvard University, "They have parts that do different things, perform different functions. Some of it which you can see, some of it which you have to study in a pathology lab in order to figure it out." As senior facilities manager, Tribble is intimately familiar with what he calls the "guts" of the buildings on Harvard's campus. And, he says, it's not hard to find places where the "guts" can be improved. "Certainly the lighting systems are an obvious target," Tribble said. "Lighting systems have continued to improve over the last 30 years. That's usually the first thing you do." For labs, air handling systems are a close second. For safety reasons, air that's gone through a lab space can't be recirculated. The whole building has to be refilled with fresh air several times an hour. So, a few years ago when Tribble and the facilitates team started looking for ways to save energy, they realized the ventilation rate was a good place to start. But in order to reduce the airflow into the labs, the valves in the air vents needed smaller openings. The department, though, couldn't afford to replace all the vents. So Tom Tribble found another way. He tricked the system into thinking the valves were smaller by inserting metal disks with a series of holes cut out in a daisy-like pattern. The disks were manufactured on campus and installed, all at a fraction of what it would have cost to replace the valves. And so with some creative thinking, five hundred small metal disks, and $300,000 from Harvard's green revolving, Tribble and his team were able to reduce the building's energy use significantly. Green-Revolving Funds Like a growing number of schools across the country, Harvard has committed to cutting its on-campus carbon footprint and it's established a multi-million dollar green revolving fund to pay for energy efficiency upgrades. That fund is how Tom Tribble got his energy efficiency project financed. Craig Bradford oversees building maintenance and upgrades for Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences. He said the project was worth every bit of time and money. "This project paid back in just about a year. So basically we’re going to do this whole expensive project, and within a year we’ll have saved all the money we just spent on the project in a reduction of utilities," said Bradford. Listen: WGBH's Science Editor Heather Goldstone explains how Green Revolving Funds work. And that is the appeal of energy efficiency upgrades and green revolving funds. As soon as one project is paid off, that money can go right back out the door to start another. Think revolving door. Plus, the energy savings keep coming in. Mark Orlowski is the founder of the Boston-based non-profit, the Sustainable Endowments Institute. "What's nice about that is it then allows the the additional savings to actually either help lower operational costs, or to then go to other interesting, exciting, necessary opportunities to put capital into, where money wouldn't otherwise be available," said Mark Orlowski. Orlowski's foundation is working to get schools to commit a collective one billion dollars to green revolving funds. And so far they've had more than $110 million from more than 50 institutions -- including Harvard, Boston University, and the University of Vermont. "Some institutions might not be ready to divest right now," Orlowski said. "I think revolving funds are a great opportunity and option of institutions that maybe aren't quite ready." But ultimately, Orlowski doesn't think a school's environmental strategy needs to be either, or. This is the third story from WGBH's On Campus in a week-long series, The Cost of Divestment. The series was done in partnership with WCAI's Living Lab, a forum for the stories behind science headlines....

Measles Outbreak That Began At Disneyland Is Nearing An End

Anna Almendrala | April 16, 2015 | Healthy Living
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A measles outbreak that began at Disneyland and reignited debate about vaccinations is nearing an end. The outbreak will be declared over in California on Friday if no new cases pop up, according to the California Department of Public Health. Disease investigators worked for months to...

New App Allows Homeless Newspaper Vendors To Accept Digital Payments

Reuters | April 17, 2015 | Impact
By Eric M. Johnson SEATTLE (Reuters) - Street vendors selling Seattle's Real Change newspaper will accept digital payments from Thursday through a new smartphone application developed by workers at Google Inc in a volunteer project to help hawkers serve increasingly cashless patrons. Seattle residents looking for a weekly dose...

Mom Delivers Only Set Of All-Girl Quintuplets In The U.S.

Caroline Bologna | April 16, 2015 | Parents
On Wednesday, April 8, Texas mom Danielle Busby delivered the first set of all-girl quintuplets in the U.S., CNN affiliate KPRC reports. They are the world's first surviving set of all-girl quintuplets since 1969. According to the Houston-based news station, the Busby girls were delivered in four minutes...

This 'Smart' Pillow Connects To Your Phone And Uses Speakers To Help You Sleep

Alexis Kleinman | April 16, 2015 | Technology
There are lots of devices out there that track your sleep, but there's now a product that's meant to both track and improve your sleep. It's a "smart pillow" called Chrona, and it launched on Kickstarter on Thursday. Chrona is a thin memory foam pillow that sits...