THE BLOG
08/15/2014 04:23 pm ET | Updated Oct 15, 2014

The Threat of Just-in-Time Scheduling

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One of the most unnoticed labor trends in the past few decades has been the rise of "just-in-time scheduling," the practice of scheduling workers' shifts with little advance notice that are subject to cancelation hours before they are due to begin. Such scheduling practices mean that already low-wage workers often have fluctuating pay checks, leading them to rely on shady lenders or credit cards to make ends meet. Such consequences especially affect women and workers of color, who disproportionately fill these jobs.

just in time
Source: Susan J. Lambert, Peter J. Fugiel, and Julia R. Henly, "Schedule Unpredictability among Young Adult Workers in the US Labor Market: A National Snapshot," July 2014 (Click symbol to enlarge)

New research from three University of Chicago professors, Susan J. Lambert, Peter J. Fugiel, and Julia R. Henly, examines scheduling practices for young adults (26 to 32 years old). Many outlets have reported their finding that part-time workers face greater scheduling uncertainty than full-time workers: 39 percent of full-time workers report receiving hours one week or less before work, compared to 47 percent of part-time workers. But less attention has been paid to the race gap: 49 percent of blacks and 47 percent of Hispanics receive their hours with a week or less of notice, compared with 39 percent of white workers.

Non-white workers also report far less control over their hours. Lambert and her co-authors find that 47 percent of white workers have their hours set by their employer. By contrast, 55 percent of blacks and 58 percent of Latinos say their employer sets their hours. Only 10 percent of Latinos and 12 percent of blacks report being able to set their hours "freely" or "within limits," while 18 percent of white workers do.

just in time scheduling
Source: Susan J. Lambert, Peter J. Fugiel, and Julia R. Henly, "Schedule Unpredictability among Young Adult Workers in the US Labor Market: A National Snapshot," July 2014 (Click symbol to enlarge)

Hours vary widely from week to week for many of the young adults Lambert and her colleagues studied. They find that "among the 74 percent of hourly workers who report at least some fluctuation in weekly work hours ... their weekly work hours varied from their usual hours by, on average, almost 50 percent during the course of the prior month." Such large fluctuations in hours also indicate large fluctuations in wages, which make life difficult for an increasingly debt-burdened overall population.

In a previous study Lambert and Julia Henly also found that unpredictable schedules increase stress and often disrupt a worker's family life. Using data from 21 stores across the U.S. they found that workers with unpredictable schedules reported more stress and conflict between work and family life. "Precarious scheduling practices are not isolated within a few organizations but rather reflect growing national and international trends," they concluded. As the world becomes increasingly globalized and labor commodified, employees will be treated more like "factors of production" and less like people. Rather than a few egregious corporations, such practices are increasingly the norm in low-wage and middle-wage industries.