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John La Puma MD's Comments

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Fruits, Vegetables Linked With Lower Risk Of Heart Attack, Stroke: Study

Fruits, Vegetables Linked With Lower Risk Of Heart Attack, Stroke: Study

Commented Dec 4, 2012 at 11:42:40 in Healthy Living

“Excellent summary: more doctors need to write recipes on prescription slips, and give their patients the news that diet is as important as medication in preventing heart attacks (and congestive heart failure, stroke, heart attack, and death from any heart-related cause.

Something not queried about in the study is erectile dysfunction--which is often from exactly the same pathophysiology as those other diseases. I bet it improved too.”
High Fructose Corn Syrup Consumption Linked With Type 2 Diabetes Prevalence

High Fructose Corn Syrup Consumption Linked With Type 2 Diabetes Prevalence

Commented Nov 27, 2012 at 12:40:39 in Healthy Living

“I've previously described HFCS as "the Jeffrey Dahmer" of sugars, and although this study does not *establish* causation for diabetes (or murder), fructose metabolism is different than that of table sugar. Fructose metabolism occurs mostly in the liver, where it is easily converted to fat.

For a growing number of people that contributes to fatty liver disease, which is spreading rapidly: see the LA Times report and comments here: http://drjlp.com/Srb6JO.

There is good animal and increasingly suggestive human data about HFCS and liver disease...something that new diabetics should not need to worry about.”

Umm - not really on Nov 27, 2012 at 15:37:56

“So you're not a big fan of people eating lots of fruit or using primarily honey as a sweetener, are you?”
Eat Healthy! Everybody's Doing It!

Eat Healthy! Everybody's Doing It!

Commented Feb 23, 2013 at 13:32:02 in Healthy Living

“These are good arguments for the power of social contagion/peer-pressure to promo healthy eating. But I think what junk food ads and promos have is the power of story, the promise of fun, the celebrity drive.

(There is also the matter of PET scan narcotic pathways lighting up with sugar ingestive, and that addictive allusion has power too...though not insurmountable power).

Healthy eating needs this too, so more people can experience its pleasure, and the pleasure of having the energy, drive and time to do more of what you want to do.

It ought to be a pleasure-driven phenomenon, with pleasure, quality and quantity arguments. Peer-pressure can be positive, but aspiration and pleasure are even better.”
PBS's 'This Emotional Life': The Hospital Menu in the Modern Age

PBS's 'This Emotional Life': The Hospital Menu in the Modern Age

Commented Jul 28, 2010 at 14:05:51 in Healthy Living

“But the people who run hospitals largely go into it because they are more interested in the doing good, believe it or not, than making huge dollars. And the leadership of most hospitals, nonprofit or for profit (which is a tax-status, of course), actually do care about healing and prevention. Because although repeat customers can be profitable, depending on their insurance and dxes, families and staff don't like it.

Jamie Oliver is a hero, and will do whatever it takes to create change in schools. Not many schools, before pediatric obesity became a national concern, involved kids in gardens or tried to put more vegetables on plates. But media attention has helped them, and so has Mrs. Obama.

No reason we can't do the same for hospitals. I think we can. I think most people expect hospitals to do good, and food is a first step in that direction.

http://drjohnlapuma.com
http://ChefMD.com
PBS's 'This Emotional Life': The Hospital Menu in the Modern Age

PBS's 'This Emotional Life': The Hospital Menu in the Modern Age

Commented Jul 27, 2010 at 12:35:35 in Healthy Living

“As the global leader in hospital food, Sodexo is in a great position to improve hospital catering in the U.S.
There is a real hunger for better food in hospitals, especially in the U.S. (e.g., see the comments on this column), and a high integrity position to providing food that is (when possible) sustainable, organic and local. Not to mention, tasty and healthful.
Sodexo Asia may be ahead in greening institutions, providing good choices and patient empowerment. I'd love to see Sodexo bring the same ideas and spread them in North America.
JL
http://drjohnlapuma.com
http://ChefMD.com
John La Puma, MD”
Food as Medicine: 10 Tips to Change the Way You Eat (PHOTOS)

Food as Medicine: 10 Tips to Change the Way You Eat (PHOTOS)

Commented Jul 25, 2010 at 16:03:40 in Healthy Living

“*Frankly, you're an expert on how you eat and how it impacts your body too.*
This is exactly right. It's part of how food works like medicine in the body.

But most people need to learn how to be "body aware". How food affects your energy level, sleep, digestion, even joint pain is similar for many people in my practice. Which foods help people lose weight and keep it off, in contrast, seems quite individual.

But few of us are well-trained enough to notice, for example, that eating salmon for dinner the night before makes our joints feel less creaky, or that barely sweetened, probiotic-rich yogurt can help with eczema.

It is well-documented that the right diet can lower cholesterol, regulate blood pressure, improve IBS, vanquish constipation and more.

This is actually accepted by mainstream medical authorities, but not aggressively promoted, because most physicians have not been trained in nutrition. I received 4 hours in medical school, and just 2 hours in cooking school.

We reviewed over 3000 clinical studies for ChefMD's Big Book of Culinary Medicine to find how foods work for 40 different conditions, and Riva is right: food does work like medicine in the body, and that small steps make a big difference.

My goal: to show that the food doesn't have to taste like cardboard. Doctors can and should write recipes on prescription slips too. Here's a start: free healthy easy fun recipes at http://ChefMD.com
PBS's 'This Emotional Life': The Hospital Menu in the Modern Age

PBS's 'This Emotional Life': The Hospital Menu in the Modern Age

Commented Jul 25, 2010 at 14:10:47 in Healthy Living

“*No way* are "today's hospitals...learning how important a tool the menu can be when it comes to promoting healing."

Today's hospitals often still host fast food franchises, serve cheeseburgers to patients after cardiac bypass, and waste tons of food with unwanted trays and psychologically disturbing menus.

But hospitals and their executives could be leaders in healing with what you eat.

Mr. Garner may be unaware of the Balanced Menus Challenge http://bit.ly/bGlxYZ which over 304 (of 4000 U.S.) hospitals have taken, and have showcased online.

It "aims to help hospitals improve the health of its patrons as well as mitigate the cost of purchasing sustainably raised meat", and was recently shown by Hopkins researchers to be cost-saving and well-received.

He may also be unaware of the disease-causing, obesogenic effect of hospital vending machines on visitors and staff. I cite the most current research and suggest healthy alternatives here: http://bit.ly/aDXFrA

He may also be unaware that by purchasing antibiotic-free poultry, beef and dairy, and milk produced without rBGH, he could significantly reduce the potential for antibiotic resistance in his institution and community, saving dollars and length-of-stay.

There are more easy, small steps to take, which could make a big difference. But let's not pretend that most hospitals get it. They don't, and unless their customers ask for change, they won't.
John La Puma MD
author, ChefMD's Big Book of Culinary Medicine”

drvittoriarepetto on Jul 26, 2010 at 13:31:57

“Hospitals don't get it. They are still serving iceberg lettuce w/ dressing full of chemicals, hot dogs and jello and lots of white bread, white rice, sodas etc. And this is at Mount Sinai in NYC..a prestigious upscale hospital.
The doctors of the future need courses in nutrition and better knowledge of the human frame; unless you seek treatment from a orthopedic doctors, most doctors are clueless on muscloskeletalinjuries injuries.
www.drvittoriarepetto.com