iOS app Android app
Clicking Follow Back will add user to your friends list and may allow access to your Social News timeline..

HuffPost Social News

Badges:
Your Badges and the Badge Module will be removed from your profile

commenter314159's Comments

View Comments:   Sort:
next
1 - 25
Kenna Moore, Baby Born Smaller Than A Soda Can, Goes Home From Hospital (PHOTOS)

Kenna Moore, Baby Born Smaller Than A Soda Can, Goes Home From Hospital (PHOTOS)

Commented Jul 13, 2012 at 00:28:26 in Parents

“I did the same thing and no one wrote about it in the huffington post!”
huffingtonpost entry

High Rates of Autism Found in Federal Vaccine Injury Program: Study Says More Answers Needed

Commented May 10, 2011 at 18:10:40 in Home

“You only think my comment is not useful because you disagree with my stance on whether or not vaccines cause autism. I do stand corrected on autism being a broad diagnosis but I stand by the fact that many conditions can mimic autism and that there the report released today contains no proof or evidence at all to backup a connection between vaccines and autism.”

Bike Commuter on May 11, 2011 at 14:32:05

“You were not that far off. Your idea of autism being a broad diagnosis is exactly what the authors of the paper did. They combined symptoms in a broad range and called it autism without the confirmation of diagnosis. They took cases where there was sharing of symptoms (where some factors of autism existed but not enough to call it autism).
 
This concept is further described by Dyson in a comment above.”

ZoeyMO on May 10, 2011 at 21:08:06

“NO conditions can "mimic" autism. Autism is diagnosed based upon observed behaviors. Therefore, if a condition "mimics" autism it IS autism and those children are diagnosed with autism. There is no difference. Which is not to say that there are not many causes of autism. There are. But, obviously, among them are vaccinations.”

usna73 on May 10, 2011 at 19:34:48

“I wouldn't disagree with you, except to say that labels are useless. Vaccines can cause injury. That acknowledgement is the reason that NVICP exists.

An injured party may or may not have a "diagnosis" which is accurate. It may also be undeniable that they have undergone irreparable harm.”
huffingtonpost entry

High Rates of Autism Found in Federal Vaccine Injury Program: Study Says More Answers Needed

Commented May 10, 2011 at 15:46:42 in Home

“there is nothing here to debunk. It is reasonable and not unexpected that some kids who were compensated had signs of autism. This is because autism is a broad diagnosis that shares symptoms with many conditions. There is not much else do this story.”

virginia1931 on May 10, 2011 at 16:07:51

“another fighter of justice, hmmmm? Autism is not a broad diagnosis and although DSMV will be folding in all of the subtypes, traditionally, autism has meant impairment with language, social issues, and repetitive behavior. Those are all visuals of brain damage.

Time for you to find a more useful trade rather than minimize that vaccines can cause brain damage - autism.”
Homeopathy For Radiation Poisoning

Homeopathy For Radiation Poisoning

Commented Apr 4, 2011 at 14:40:35 in Home

“If the homeopathic medicines work so well, why would you need to use them in addition fo standard conventional protocol?”

docmalerba on Apr 4, 2011 at 18:10:27

“Because I can walk and chew gum at the same time. I suppose if I had advocated for skipping conventional protocol you would be making a point of that too. Given the limitations of what conventional medicine can do for radiation sickness, most people afflicted with such a condition would be inclined to look for additional help. I choose to use the best of all that is available for my patients, both conventional and alternative.”
Homeopathy College: Now You Can Get a Doctorate in Homeopathic Medicine

Homeopathy College: Now You Can Get a Doctorate in Homeopathic Medicine

Commented Feb 8, 2011 at 21:53:36 in Home

“you do realize that disproving A doesn't prove B if A and B are not related to each other, right? No, I don't think you realize this.”
In the Vaccine-Autism Debate, What Can Parents Believe?

In the Vaccine-Autism Debate, What Can Parents Believe?

Commented Jan 11, 2011 at 22:59:19 in Home

“of course, the Amish also don't watch TV or use cell phones. They are an awful test population.”
In the Vaccine-Autism Debate, What Can Parents Believe?

In the Vaccine-Autism Debate, What Can Parents Believe?

Commented Jan 11, 2011 at 22:58:15 in Home

“I have a pretty strong feeling that citing any of the man many studies of thousands of children would not sway you one bit. But to anyone reading this who is on the fence, there are many studies, and these studies have looked at thousands of children, and they show that autism is not caused by vaccines.”

Jimbo23 on Jan 14, 2011 at 11:32:27

“Sorry but the HP interface seems to have done something weird to that link. Trying again...

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-31727_162-20016356-10391695.html

Jimbo23 on Jan 13, 2011 at 12:40:31

“All I asked for were some examples. Got any or do you prefer to just tell me you have them and assume that will satisfy me? Riddle me this: If vaccine makers know they product is safe and "autism is not caused by vaccines" as you so boldly assert without a shred of evidence offered then why do they pay out so much in damages for "brain damage" but nothing for autism? Here's a very reputable story for you to mull.

http://www­.cbsnews.c­om/8301-31­727_162-20­016356-103­91695.html”

English Socialist on Jan 12, 2011 at 06:30:56

“Perfectly true. The amount of studies into this are immense. There is no evidence at all to suggest that that there is a link between the mmr jab and autism. I am confident that if another 10,000 studies showed that there isn't a link you would find the exact same people saying there is.

On the plus side, at least it shows that people are becoming paranoid of Big Pharma. They ought to be. . . . just not in this case.”
In the Vaccine-Autism Debate, What Can Parents Believe?

In the Vaccine-Autism Debate, What Can Parents Believe?

Commented Jan 11, 2011 at 11:07:36 in Home

“It's not vaccines are 100% safe, it's that we have a pretty good understanding of what the real adverse reactions to vaccines are, and Autism isn't one of them. It is absolutely true that vaccines are not safe for everybody, but they are safe for almost everybody and don't cause Autism.”

Jimbo23 on Jan 11, 2011 at 11:56:07

“Thanks "Doctor" but how exactly do you know vaccines "don't cause Autism". That's a pretty authoritative statement. Care to sight a study? If you'd read the article you'd know that only 2 out of 36 standard vaccines in the U.S. have even been investigated for a link to autism.”

Patrik on Jan 11, 2011 at 11:43:11

“Wow! I'll actually have to agree with that one.
Vaccines are not 100% safe.
We have a pretty good idea of what adverse reactions to vaccines are (just read the insert).
Autism is a compilation of many different adverse reactions that occur after the vaccine schedule shuts down a person's natural ability to fight disease on it's own.
Vaccine are not safe for ANYONE when those responsible have not released the mechanism for how any of these adverse reactions occur.
It's a lot more than irresponsible how these Companies are going about business.”

Twyla on Jan 11, 2011 at 11:29:54

“Actually, we know that sometimes vaccines do cause autism.
http://big.assets.huffingtonpost.com/BANKS_CASE.pdf
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-kirby/the-vaccineautism-court-d_b_88558.html

We just don't really know how often, because our government makes no effort to track this.
"CBS News has learned the government has paid more than 1,300 brain injury claims in vaccine court since 1988, but is not studying those cases or tracking how many of them resulted in autism. The branch of the government that handles vaccine court told CBS News: 'Some children who have been compensated for vaccine injuries…may ultimately end up with autism or autistic symptoms, but we do not track cases on this basis.'”
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/05/12/cbsnews_investigates/main4086809.shtml

And since VAERS reporting is not an enforced requirement, and parents are ususally told that vaccine reactions are just a coincidence, and there is no developed science to identify vaccine injuries, the reported injuries are a fraction of the actual.

See Dr. Jon Poling's 1/2/2009 letter:
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/eletters/123/1/e164
"What is post-vaccination encephalopathy? What are the mechanisms? Is there any treatment? Can it look like “autism?” There are many unknowns here, as no concerted effort has been made to understand the scope of post-vaccination encephalopathy."

See Barbara Loe Fisher's article:
http://www.nvic.org/NVIC-Vaccine-News/November-2008/Thursday,-November-20,-2008-Vaccine-Injury-Compens.aspx
Exploring the Research on Homeopathic Treatment for Fibromyalgia

Exploring the Research on Homeopathic Treatment for Fibromyalgia

Commented Nov 16, 2010 at 09:43:19 in Home

“But if they could sell you that 6 dollar tube for less than 6 dollars, they could make a profit. Also, homeopathy wouldn't have any of the dangers associated with experimental drugs. Why would a pfizer brand of homeopathy be more dangerous than a boiron bran?”
Exploring the Research on Homeopathic Treatment for Fibromyalgia

Exploring the Research on Homeopathic Treatment for Fibromyalgia

Commented Nov 15, 2010 at 16:02:50 in Home

“If homeopathy worked, it would upend just about everything we know in science. The princples it is based on are just silly. Furthermore, what is stopping a major drug company from selling a homeopathic remedy? Would you trust a homeopathic remedy made by pfizer? Why or why not?”

ChristyRed on Nov 15, 2010 at 19:34:23

“The same few arguments, nonsensical at best, repeated over and over and over ad nauseum!

But I'll address one comment, "Would you trust a homeopathic remedy made by pfizer?" You bet I wouldn't! They were fined $430 million for criminal marketing of Neurontin, claiming it worked for pain even though it was never approved for pain. They were most recently fined $2.3 billion -- BILLION -- again for criminal marketing of drugs like Zoloft and Viagra. The US Attorney General's Office noted that while Pfizer was settling one indictment it was continuing to violate the same laws in marketing other drugs.

At any rate, Pfizer isn't going to sell homeopathics any more than any other drug company is going to do that for the simple reason that at $6 for a tube of 80 pellets which could last months, years or even a lifetime, they couldn't begin to make enough money to buy themselves coffee.

In addition to that homeopathics don't cause "side effects" (a euphemism for diseases) which will then force the patient to purchase more drugs which he will never be able to stop using.”
huffingtonpost entry

Suzanne Somers, Anti-Aging Prophet? I Don't Think So

Commented Oct 26, 2010 at 11:48:35 in Home

“I am happy to see an article here about the dangers of trusting celebs as medical experts, but I don't think your article goes far enough. There is no reason to believe that bio-identical hormones are any different from the kind that are FDA approved except that they are easier to get a hold of without a prescription. Doing this is abusing steroids. There is simply no reason why a woman even needs these drugs, and there is plenty of reason to believe taking them is very very dangerous. Hormones are some of the most powerful drugs we know of, why would anyone pop them like candy because a celeb says so?”

jacquelinenh on Oct 26, 2010 at 12:46:06

“There are so many completely natural things you can do to stay healthy in menopause -- http://www.womentowomen.com/menopause/symptomrelief.aspx -- things like changes in diet, exercise, meditation, use of traditional herbs, etc. But they never seem to get mentioned by SS or Oprah or any other celeb as a viable option. I would love to see more of a discussion of how we can make simple, medication-free choices to stay healthy as we age.”
FDA Approved: The Maximum Amount Of Defects Allowed In Your Food (PHOTOS)

FDA Approved: The Maximum Amount Of Defects Allowed In Your Food (PHOTOS)

Commented Oct 26, 2010 at 11:42:28 in Home

“Who do you think regulates organic food? These stats are pure shock value. Of course there must be some acceptable limit on these things or selling food would be impossible.”

ctblue on Oct 26, 2010 at 18:04:13

“There are other independent agents that certify organic food. For example, the OAI.”
huffingtonpost entry

Autism and Assault in Our Family

Commented Aug 26, 2010 at 11:44:53 in Healthy Living

“Here is a topic we can agree on Ms. Stagliano. Obviously child abuse is horrible and I think we can agree that the best way to help end this type of abuse is to teach people about autism and make them aware of difficulties that autistic children and adults have. However, the website you belong to, ageofautism.com is against the proposed changes to the DSM V that would make autism a much a more inclusive diagnosis, therefore increasing its public presence and by default, the public's awareness of autism. I think your website should reconsider its opinion on those changes.”

hp blogger Kim Stagliano on Aug 30, 2010 at 08:08:39

“Dear PiGuy (or gal) - I talk about DSM V in my book - I hope you'll check it out. Parents and people on the spectrum have varying opinions on the change. I've heard from people with Asperger's who do not want to be lumped in with autism and "adults who wet their pants." I've heard from parents of kids with Asperger's who desperately need more help to get through school since the social component is as important as the academic for lifeksills success. I think we approach the change from our own unique perspective for our loved one (or selves for those on the spectrum.) Thanks for the kind words for Bella. If this isn't common ground - it doesn't exist, don't you agree?

Best,

KIM”
Why Eating a Low-Fat Diet Doesn't Lead to Weight Loss

Why Eating a Low-Fat Diet Doesn't Lead to Weight Loss

Commented Jul 7, 2010 at 13:41:47 in Healthy Living

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16043737

Here is a another study by Dr. Ludwig with a negative result.
Good for Dr. Ludwig for being willing to publish a negative result, bad for Dr. Hyman for ignoring it.”
Why Eating a Low-Fat Diet Doesn't Lead to Weight Loss

Why Eating a Low-Fat Diet Doesn't Lead to Weight Loss

Commented Jul 7, 2010 at 13:39:40 in Healthy Living

“someone flagged me as abusive. I hope this comment is less so.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17507345
the above is a link to a study by the dr that hyman mentions. The experiment involved 73 people, half of which given a low fat diet and half of which given a low glycemic diet. There was no significant weight differences in either group after the study, but people who had higher baseline levels of insulin responded better to the low glycemic index diet. they lost 3 more kg of weight than the low fat group.

This is a nice result but I would hardly call it a breakthrough or a blockbuster result. I quote the abstract here.

"Variability in dietary weight loss trials may be partially attributable to differences in hormonal response. Reducing glycemic load may be especially important to achieve weight loss among individuals with high insulin secretion."

Again this is a nice result, and good science but it hardly warrants the kind of post Dr. Hyman has presented.
I don't think you will find anyway in Dr. Ludwig's research a statement that says eating fat doesn't make you fat.”
Why Eating a Low-Fat Diet Doesn't Lead to Weight Loss

Why Eating a Low-Fat Diet Doesn't Lead to Weight Loss

Commented Jul 7, 2010 at 12:17:08 in Healthy Living

“This post is insane. It references one persons research and treats it as true for no reason at all.
If you want to lose weight, eat fewer calories than you burn.

And Dr. Hyman should know that estrogen and testosterone effect where fat is stored not insulin.”

samknox on Jul 7, 2010 at 16:18:56

“"If you want to lose weight, eat fewer calories than you burn."

This recommendation is far more likely to result in harm than good.

A 2007 meta-analysis of dietary trials looked at 7 long-term, randomized, controlled studies, 14 observational studies with long-term follow-up, and 10 prospective studies to determine if dieting (calorie restriction), with or without exercise, was sufficiently effective to be funded by Medicare as a treatment for obesity.

They found that, in the 7 controlled studies, with a duration 2.5 to 6 years, weight-loss at the end of the trial was either insignificant or nonexistent.

In the 14 observational studies with a follow-up of at least 4 years, the average initial weight-loss was 31 pounds but, by the end of the follow-up period, the participants had regained all but 7 pounds of that loss, and that 41% had regained more weight than they had lost.

Of the ten prospective studies, after 4 years, 1 showed weight-loss, 2 showed no difference, and 7 showed weight-gain. They also found that the single best indicator for future weight gain was a previous attempt to lose weight by restricting calories.

As one of the studies cited in the analysis put it, "“It is only the rate of weight regain, not the fact of weight regain, that appears open to debate.”

http://mann.bol.ucla.edu/files/Diets_don't_work.pdf”

commenter314159 on Jul 7, 2010 at 13:41:47

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16043737

Here is a another study by Dr. Ludwig with a negative result.
Good for Dr. Ludwig for being willing to publish a negative result, bad for Dr. Hyman for ignoring it.”

commenter314159 on Jul 7, 2010 at 13:39:40

“someone flagged me as abusive. I hope this comment is less so.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17507345
the above is a link to a study by the dr that hyman mentions. The experiment involved 73 people, half of which given a low fat diet and half of which given a low glycemic diet. There was no significant weight differences in either group after the study, but people who had higher baseline levels of insulin responded better to the low glycemic index diet. they lost 3 more kg of weight than the low fat group.

This is a nice result but I would hardly call it a breakthrough or a blockbuster result. I quote the abstract here.

"Variability in dietary weight loss trials may be partially attributable to differences in hormonal response. Reducing glycemic load may be especially important to achieve weight loss among individuals with high insulin secretion."

Again this is a nice result, and good science but it hardly warrants the kind of post Dr. Hyman has presented.
I don't think you will find anyway in Dr. Ludwig's research a statement that says eating fat doesn't make you fat.”
Andrew Wakefield Banned: British Doctor Behind MMR Vaccine Scare Struck Off Register

Andrew Wakefield Banned: British Doctor Behind MMR Vaccine Scare Struck Off Register

Commented May 24, 2010 at 19:51:22 in World

“I saw one argument about the Kyoto study where they took the data and showed that if you take the data from one city and extrapolate it to a diff city, then the results look like they support autism. This is practically akin to taking the graphs in the study drawing in new lines and is totally crap.”
Andrew Wakefield Banned: British Doctor Behind MMR Vaccine Scare Struck Off Register

Andrew Wakefield Banned: British Doctor Behind MMR Vaccine Scare Struck Off Register

Commented May 24, 2010 at 19:45:28 in World

“so do christmas lights, what's your point?”
Andrew Wakefield Banned: British Doctor Behind MMR Vaccine Scare Struck Off Register

Andrew Wakefield Banned: British Doctor Behind MMR Vaccine Scare Struck Off Register

Commented May 24, 2010 at 19:43:47 in World

“A piece of steak probably has half of those.”
Unplugging From Your Medicine Cabinet: Respecting the Body's Intelligence

Unplugging From Your Medicine Cabinet: Respecting the Body's Intelligence

Commented May 21, 2010 at 13:30:12 in Healthy Living

“I'm sorry, cable but you are wrong.
Those numbers are euros. That's closer to 700,000 mill or more in Us dollars. (maybe even closer to a billion depending on what exchange rate you use)”
Unplugging From Your Medicine Cabinet: Respecting the Body's Intelligence

Unplugging From Your Medicine Cabinet: Respecting the Body's Intelligence

Commented May 21, 2010 at 13:20:41 in Healthy Living

“like St Thomas says, you have no evidence that he is sponsored by a drug company, but even if he was, how does that prevent you from reading what he has to say and evaluating it on its own merits?”
Unplugging From Your Medicine Cabinet: Respecting the Body's Intelligence

Unplugging From Your Medicine Cabinet: Respecting the Body's Intelligence

Commented May 21, 2010 at 13:18:55 in Healthy Living

“It's not about making money, its that he is promoting not taking medicine in the first part of the article and then promoting taking the medicine he supports in the second part. If you don't see the contradiction there then there is nothing I can do to help you.”
Unplugging From Your Medicine Cabinet: Respecting the Body's Intelligence

Unplugging From Your Medicine Cabinet: Respecting the Body's Intelligence

Commented May 21, 2010 at 09:42:37 in Healthy Living

“How do medical errors prove that homeopathy works?
When the Mets' shortstop on TV makes an error does that prove I can play shortstop better than he can?
(for those playing at home the answers are: They don't.”
Unplugging From Your Medicine Cabinet: Respecting the Body's Intelligence

Unplugging From Your Medicine Cabinet: Respecting the Body's Intelligence

Commented May 21, 2010 at 09:36:24 in Healthy Living

“Mr. Ullman, maybe I would take your advice about taking less medicines more seriously if there wasn't a link at the end of it for buying your book your own medicines.”

ChristyRed on May 21, 2010 at 10:53:51

“1. Don't other medical professionals make money from their work? Whether it's writing books, lecturing, teaching or seeing patients?

2. Homeopathics are no one's proprietary medicines.

3. Do you buy conventional drugs even though the magazines and TV programs are full of ads for them sponsored by the very companies that make them but who also forgot to tell doctors and the public about all the diseases these drugs create?”
huffingtonpost entry

Frontline's "The Vaccine War" Misses Half the Story

Commented Apr 28, 2010 at 23:21:32 in Healthy Living

“Barbera low Fischer and JB handley are just parents now huh? That they run the two biggest organizations are your side means nothing?”

22shotsin1yr on Apr 29, 2010 at 00:23:03

“yes they are just parents that happen to run organizations because they were thrust into this debacle. So what does that have to do with doctors that were interviewed not being included?”
next
1 - 25