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Leon Panetta, Secretary Of Defense, Defends Slimmed-Down Military Budget Plan

Leon Panetta, Secretary Of Defense, Defends Slimmed-Down Military Budget Plan

Commented Feb 14, 2012 at 10:25:54 in Politics

“The choices here are clear. Continue to spend on defense and war, or continue to spend on healthcare and badly needed infrastructure upgrades. We simply cannot afford both with our negative balance of trade. The republicans simply favor the former over the latter while having no clue as to how to fix the real issues of trade imbalance.

Anyone that wants to continue to spend more than the rest of the world combined on defense, should first figure out how to decrease our balance of trade deficit. Every year we get poorer, while China, Germany and countries with positive balance of trade get richer.

Countries with positive balance of trade increase their standard of living while countries with negative balance of trade decrease theirs. It's pretty simple economics really.

The real question on spending is how to fix our negative trade balance?”

Time in Motion on Feb 14, 2012 at 15:23:50

“Yes the ratio is wrong, but don't forget the rich GOP has to protect those war profits for the very rich. Its fine when wars are raging and the rich get their money then the Dem's come in and want to screw the military man and woman. Thanks for your service but your no longer needed and get in line in the private sector. Along comes Mitty finds a way of screwing public and lets take it out on the Defense dept. Watch em scramble when Iran or Al aqaida acts up and we're to thin. Makes it harder on those still in. I vote for Obama because he wants to build up America another 4 years and I think he will do it. I am a republican and dissatified with our GOP canditates. All I am saying to the DEm's is don't cut too deep because when sh.. hits the fan you'll be left with a raw chicken sandwich in your hand and thats nasty. Republicans would love to see that happen and they could careless about jobs unless they are making the bigger piece of the pie for themselves. And don't forget those still serving and the others who have already served. They are the ones who kept this country free. They are the ones who gave their all and stepped up to the plate to their countries call. They are the ones who in battle fought and now a farewell to arms. Don't forget them America.”
Newt Gingrich On Occupy Wall Street: Barney Frank, Chris Dodd Should Go To Jail (VIDEO)

Newt Gingrich On Occupy Wall Street: Barney Frank, Chris Dodd Should Go To Jail (VIDEO)

Commented Oct 12, 2011 at 10:14:28 in Politics

“Newt Gingrich and Phil Gramm need to be in jail for their part in repealing Glass-Steagall allowing investment banks to gamble with depositor's money.

The financial meltdown is a direct result of repealing Gramm/Leach/Baily.

It was Morgan Stanley, Leimans and the rest of wall street that was pushing banks to lower lending standards so they could sell more derivatives, not Fannie and Freddie, as republican would have us believe.

Glass–Steagall Act prohibited any one institution from acting as any combination of an investment bank, a commercial bank, and an insurance company.

"The Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act allowed commercial banks, investment banks, securities firms, and insurance companies to consolidate. For example, Citicorp (a commercial bank holding company) merged with Travelers Group (an insurance company) in 1998 to form the conglomerate Citigroup, a corporation combining banking, securities and insurance services under a house of brands that included Citibank, Smith Barney, Primerica, and Travelers. This combination, announced in 1998, would have violated the Glass–Steagall Act and the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 by combining securities, insurance, and banking, if not for a temporary waiver process.[1] The law was passed to legalize these mergers on a permanent basis. GLB also repealed Glass–Steagall's conflict of interest prohibitions "against simultaneous service by any officer, director, or employee of a securities firm as an officer, director, or employee of any member bank.""”

Roberta ShoemakerBeal on Oct 12, 2011 at 11:10:32

“Thank you for having a good and true memory, that moves beyond "sound byte" and "presidential debate" limited spin and TELLING IT LIKE IT REALLY WAS/IS! The truth is so often trampled theses days, by limted memory and polarized pubic opinion. Actual historical truth is "smusched" beyond recognition. Thanks so much. Pleaes keep us informed and advised!”

morbius on Oct 12, 2011 at 10:31:34

“At last; a poster who has done some research. Congrats.”

DaveInWheaton on Oct 12, 2011 at 10:21:16

“F&F”
huffingtonpost entry

The Arab Press' Nazification of Israeli Leaders

Commented Jan 2, 2011 at 12:23:59 in World

“I should have said either Israel or it's democracy are doomed by demographics.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Arab Press' Nazification of Israeli Leaders

Commented Dec 30, 2010 at 10:50:23 in World

“Israel is doomed by demographics. Sometime in the next 20 years, the Jewish majority will become an Arab majority that will simply vote them out of office.”

oldlib127 on Jan 1, 2011 at 13:12:30

“In twenty years Israel will be a theocracy. Only those approved by the Right Wing will be allowed to vote”
huffingtonpost entry

If You Care About Farm Animals: Eat Them.

Commented Dec 23, 2010 at 09:52:40 in Green

“There is also the adaptation we humans have in our incisors, and canine teeth.”
Nuclear Power Pros And Cons: Is It Key To America's Energy Future? (PHOTOS)

Nuclear Power Pros And Cons: Is It Key To America's Energy Future? (PHOTOS)

Commented Dec 23, 2010 at 09:47:59 in Green

“Thank you for pointing out that there is more than one way to interpret the term: "melting down". The LFTR cannot "melt down" in the sense of sustaining a runaway reaction in which the core melts the containment and melts all the way to china -as in "china syndrome."

As you rightfully point out, the core salts must be melted into a liquid form, by using an external heat source such as electric elements before any nuclear reaction can even be started in the core. This is part of the passive safety inherent in this design. Should the core somehow be breached for any reason, the salts would quickly cool below that approximately 700 deg. melting point, and the reaction would then automatically stop. In other words, the reaction is not self sustaining, so if you turn the heaters off, the reaction stops.

That is what I call a considerably safer reactor than anything we have today.”
Chu: Will America Miss Its

Chu: Will America Miss Its "Sputnik Moment" on Energy?

Commented Dec 1, 2010 at 10:25:31 in Green

“Yet, the most promising technology we have ever invented, the Liquid Fluoride Molten Salt Thorium Reactor, is not even getting a single dime of R&D from DoE. Chu has barely heard of it, and is badly informed as to it's unsolved issues. Chu recently dismissed it for problems with materials cracking, without any apparent knowledge that those issues were solved decades ago.

Anyone interested­, can check out the LFTR here:
http://www­.youtube.c­om/watch?v­=AZR0UKxNP­h8

http://hom­e.earthlin­k.net/~bhoglund/­multiMissi­onMSR.html”
Nuclear Power Pros And Cons: Is It Key To America's Energy Future? (PHOTOS)

Nuclear Power Pros And Cons: Is It Key To America's Energy Future? (PHOTOS)

Commented Nov 29, 2010 at 14:34:19 in Green

“I live near Comanche Peak. I would much rather live next to a nuclear plant than a coal plant.”
Nuclear Power Pros And Cons: Is It Key To America's Energy Future? (PHOTOS)

Nuclear Power Pros And Cons: Is It Key To America's Energy Future? (PHOTOS)

Commented Nov 29, 2010 at 14:29:59 in Green

“The LFTR is not your grandfather's antique Chernobol reactor. It cannot melt down.

Anyone interested, can check out the LFTR here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZR0UKxNPh8

http://home.earthlink.net/~bhoglund/multiMissionMSR.html”

Michael Mann on Dec 19, 2010 at 16:38:55

“@fabco, Technically speaking the LFTR has to "melt down" in order to work, hence "liquid" in the name Liquid Flouride Thorium Reactor. It is passivly safe however, shutting itself down without damage in case of any accident. Love the video! The remix is good too!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWUeBSoEnRk
huffingtonpost entry

If You Care About Farm Animals: Eat Them.

Commented Nov 23, 2010 at 09:04:39 in Green

“The umami taste receptor is what makes that steak taste good to you. If you didn't have it, you wouldn't like meat. Therefore, the non-exclusivity of the umami taste receptor is irrevelant to the issue of it being a genetic and biological adaptation that favors the eating of meat.

It is the necessitity of eating that creates the dilemma of morality here, not whether the line is drawn at eating animals or plants. Plants too are alive, and that life is still terminated as a result of our eating them.

Certainly, you can choose to try and override a couple of million years of evolution that causes you to favor and savor eating meat, only to find yourself still in the same moral dilemma for terminating the living plant. Or, you can embrace your true nature, and enjoy what you eat.”

jumbotron16 on Nov 24, 2010 at 13:48:13

“Too logical! :)”
huffingtonpost entry

If You Care About Farm Animals: Eat Them.

Commented Nov 21, 2010 at 11:50:59 in Green

“I have shown my evidence for meat taste receptors in the human tongue. What is your evidence it is inaccurate?

Pete Rawlins: "They are genetically and biologically programmed to seek out foods that their bodies are designed to process. "

What is your evidence humans are not also genetically programmed to seek out meat?”

Pete Rawlins on Nov 21, 2010 at 14:05:46

“Fabco, thank you for the information on the umami taste. I read that section of the document you linked to, and looked into it further online. The term umami was coined for this flavor in 1907 by a Japanese researcher Kikunge Ikeda after discovering the contributions of glutamic acid and other nonessential amino acids upon the evaporation of a large amount of kombu (a seaweed) broth. "These crystals, when tasted, reproduced the ineffable but undeniable flavor he detected in many foods, most especially in seaweed." The umami flavor is also referred to as savoriness. Plants contain protein, amino acids and glutamates as well. Thus the umami taste is not exclusively an animal-food related taste. The document you provided also stated, "Other scientific challenges still wait to be tackled by taste research. In the evolution of animal species [which includes humans], adaptive changes of taste receptors have occurred, which supported or generated new food preferences, probably driven by changes in food availability [or changes in choice]. We do not yet understand these long-term changes." This would provide some evidence that humans are not genetically programmed to seek out meat. Culture, marketing, and social acceptance also play a role in human food choices.”
huffingtonpost entry

If You Care About Farm Animals: Eat Them.

Commented Nov 21, 2010 at 11:47:28 in Green

http://www.cavehill.uwi.edu/FPAS/bcs/courses/Biochemistry/BL38B/pdfs/pdf3/38b3_lindeman.pdf

Umami taste

The biological significance of this basic taste, discovered about 100 years ago, is high, comparable perhaps to that of sweet taste. ‘Umami’, a term derived from the Japanese umai (delicious), designates a pleasant taste sensation which is qualitatively different from sweet, salty, sour and bitter93. Umami is a dominant taste of food containing L-glutamate, like chicken-broth, meat extracts and ageing cheese.”
huffingtonpost entry

If You Care About Farm Animals: Eat Them.

Commented Nov 21, 2010 at 10:34:50 in Green

“The next time you see a hawk eat a field mouse, try and explain to it that it is unethical and immoral for it to do so.

A couple of million years of evolution has given humans a taste receptor in their tongue, specifically for meat. Therefore, it is hard for me to rationalize any immorality in doing so.

How many animals do you think humans would leave on this planet, if not for their utility as food?”

Pete Rawlins on Nov 21, 2010 at 10:59:34

“Fabco, unlike humans, animals don't have a choice. They are genetically and biologically programmed to seek out foods that their bodies are designed to process. Your second statement about the meat taste receptors in the human tongue is inaccurate. Tests have been done with vegans, vegetarians and meat-eaters, and even brain waves indicate that meat-eating is not a given for humans, but rather a choice. And indeed, the anatomy and physiology of the human body is much more suited to processing herbivorous (plant) rather than carnivorous (animal) foods.”
Nuclear Power Pros And Cons: Is It Key To America's Energy Future? (PHOTOS)

Nuclear Power Pros And Cons: Is It Key To America's Energy Future? (PHOTOS)

Commented Nov 20, 2010 at 10:32:33 in Green

“If that were true, I would agree with you. Nice allegation, but I don't see any substantiation besides your opinion. Can you prove it?

Reduction of waste from 99% to 0.001% is not the same problem. Simplification of reprocessing inside the reactor rather than outside by using liquid fuels instead of solid, is not the same problem.”
Nuclear Power Pros And Cons: Is It Key To America's Energy Future? (PHOTOS)

Nuclear Power Pros And Cons: Is It Key To America's Energy Future? (PHOTOS)

Commented Nov 18, 2010 at 20:35:04 in Green

“All your links are good reasons why we have to abandon the uranium cycle completely, and go with thorium instead.

When will we start thinking outside the box? There are other types of reactor designs possible, besides the meltdown prone, fuel wasting, antique model T clunkers we build today.

““How about a newer technology reactor design that can recycle 99% of it's wastes? The best reactor design is not even in DoE's Generation IV reactor list. A good reason why DoE has missed the boat completely because of their myopic focus on the uranium cycle.

http://energyfromthorium.com/essay3rs/

“Proposal for recycling the existing nuclear waste we have now, into 1000 Gigawatts per year of near zero co2 producing electricity.
http://energyfromthorium.com/2010/03/29/kirk-sorensen-teac2-talk/”””

Nuclear critics will have to come up with some new arguments. The old arguments no longer apply when you can burn the waste as fuel.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZR0UKxNPh8

aligatorhardt on Nov 20, 2010 at 09:51:29

“Thorium is not much of an improvement. Same problems exist.”
Mitch McConnell Challenges Obama With Bold Speech

Mitch McConnell Challenges Obama With Bold Speech

Commented Nov 5, 2010 at 10:03:17 in Politics

“Turtle boy, and Boehner are already trying to divert the voters attention from the economy and jobs to healthcare. Too bad it won't work.”

JazzyJim on Nov 5, 2010 at 17:39:45

“If the GOP leadership and the Fox Propagandists were trapped in a burning car - I could sleep at night not helping them out.”

Daschenk on Nov 5, 2010 at 12:31:39

“It might work, if people are still as dumb as always”
Dealing With the Issues of Nuclear Energy

Dealing With the Issues of Nuclear Energy

Commented Oct 24, 2010 at 10:31:01 in Politics

“One wonders how you are going to get the energy back down from orbit, much less how you are going to get them up there in a cost effective way?”
Dealing With the Issues of Nuclear Energy

Dealing With the Issues of Nuclear Energy

Commented Oct 22, 2010 at 14:17:17 in Politics

“Correction, thoriumenergy.blogspot has changed to:
http://energyfromthorium.com
Dealing With the Issues of Nuclear Energy

Dealing With the Issues of Nuclear Energy

Commented Oct 22, 2010 at 13:06:47 in Politics

“Dr. Alvin Weinberg former head of Oak Ridge Laboratory in Tennessee invented the current Pressurized Light Water reactors we use today. However, he recognized their limitations and potential safety issues, and also made it his mission to develop a far better design that virtually nobody even knows about. It is truly a mind boggling thing, that nuclear engineers graduate every day without having heard about it, much less it's never being commercially developed, either.

It is called the Liquid Fluoride Molten Salt Reactor. It burns 99% of it's fuel, and produces a minuscule fraction of the waste we produce today eliminating the need for a Yucca Mountain to store it. In fact it can even burn the existing waste we have thereby turning it into a resource instead of a problem. It produces no weapons grade material because it burns thorium instead of uranium, thereby producing no plutonium to worry about finding it's way into bombs. It can even produce more fuel than it consumes, thereby providing unlimited co2 free sustainable energy 24/7, not just when the sun shines or the wind blows. It is inherently safe, and meltdown proof.

More information can be found here:
http://home.earthlink.net/~bhoglund/multiMissionMSR.html
And here: see the archives
http://thoriumenergy.blogspot.com

fabco on Oct 22, 2010 at 14:17:17

“Correction, thoriumenergy.blogspot has changed to:
http://energyfromthorium.com
Dealing With the Issues of Nuclear Energy

Dealing With the Issues of Nuclear Energy

Commented Oct 22, 2010 at 13:01:02 in Politics

“Building 2,500 reactors by 2050 would lead to nearly a quadrupling of the average rate at which spent fuel is generated. Assuming a constant rate of growth, one repository with the legal capacity of the U.S. government’s Yucca Mountain facility in Nevada would have to come online somewhere in the world every three years. The seriousness of that challenge is illustrated by the fact that Yucca Mountain itself is years from being operational. Its opening was originally scheduled for 1998. It is now set, at the earliest, for 2017, and even that target is unlikely to be met. And the U.S. Department of Energy has already spent nearly $9 billion on Yucca Mountain—money that federal law requires nuclear utilities to charge their ratepayers. In the meantime, the cost of storing spent fuel at the country’s 66 reactor sites has been soaring, and utilities have sued the Energy Department for breach of contract for not removing their spent fuel. The lack of a repository has become a major stumbling block to the expansion of nuclear ­power.

If uranium presents too many challenges, and other sources are too uncertain, the question then becomes what kind of nuclear reactor is it prudent to build that many of? The same old technology we have today that burns barely 1% of the fuel, generates tons of highly dangerous waste, and almost nobody likes, or do we decide to try and go with a far better design?”

fabco on Oct 22, 2010 at 13:06:47

“Dr. Alvin Weinberg former head of Oak Ridge Laboratory in Tennessee invented the current Pressurized Light Water reactors we use today. However, he recognized their limitations and potential safety issues, and also made it his mission to develop a far better design that virtually nobody even knows about. It is truly a mind boggling thing, that nuclear engineers graduate every day without having heard about it, much less it's never being commercially developed, either.

It is called the Liquid Fluoride Molten Salt Reactor. It burns 99% of it's fuel, and produces a minuscule fraction of the waste we produce today eliminating the need for a Yucca Mountain to store it. In fact it can even burn the existing waste we have thereby turning it into a resource instead of a problem. It produces no weapons grade material because it burns thorium instead of uranium, thereby producing no plutonium to worry about finding it's way into bombs. It can even produce more fuel than it consumes, thereby providing unlimited co2 free sustainable energy 24/7, not just when the sun shines or the wind blows. It is inherently safe, and meltdown proof.

More information can be found here:
http://home.earthlink.net/~bhoglund/multiMissionMSR.html
And here: see the archives
http://thoriumenergy.blogspot.com
Beyond

Beyond "Climategeddon" - from science education to solutions

Commented Jun 27, 2010 at 10:00:59 in Green

“And, without explanation as to what Rial was using for input data for the next 50k years, that graph is meaningless.

Since, you have quit discussion, and gone back to name calling and mysterious lauging over nothing, we apparently have nothing more to talk about.”
Beyond

Beyond "Climategeddon" - from science education to solutions

Commented Jun 27, 2010 at 09:56:39 in Green

“Apparently, you are only perfectly clear in your own mind, and you have not clarified one bit. Is the quote above not good enough for you or what?”
Beyond

Beyond "Climategeddon" - from science education to solutions

Commented Jun 26, 2010 at 14:16:56 in Green

“If I don't understand, it is because you aren't explaining what the heck you are talking about.

I take that to mean you can't, because otherwise you would be happy to rub my face in it if you could.

The PETM was just background to show polar ice pack formed after that time. Surely you understood that.

Fig 4 indicates increasing ice from the MPT until now. So, what the heck are you talking about? Summer?”
Beyond

Beyond "Climategeddon" - from science education to solutions

Commented Jun 26, 2010 at 14:12:04 in Green

“No more than you are wasting mine. What is your question exactly? Are you asking the speed of the fastest occilloscopes or fastest that I have personally observed? I think you are surely capable of determining the nyquist freq of a 5 Ghz scope.

Note the quote below says "any scale."

http://www.mcgoodwin.net/pages/otherbooks/jg_chaos.html
"Benoit Mandelbrot (1960) finds recurring patterns at every scale in data on cotton prices. He had studied transmission line noise and concluded noise was patterned like a Cantor set (p. 93), i.e., that on any scale the proportion of noise-containing periods to error-free periods was a constant-- thus errors were inevitable and must be planned for by incorporating redundancy. "”
Beyond

Beyond "Climategeddon" - from science education to solutions

Commented Jun 24, 2010 at 16:41:35 in Green

“What makes me think they haven't is fig 4 in above link. What makes you think they have? Since you are laughing so hard, why not let everyone laugh by explaining what the heck you are talking about.”
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