iOS app Android app
Clicking Follow Back will add user to your friends list and may allow access to your Social News timeline..

HuffPost Social News

Badges:
Your Badges and the Badge Module will be removed from your profile

guterman's Comments

View Comments:   Sort:
next
1 - 25
John Boehner Says The GOP Should Be More 'Sensitive' To Women, Support Gay Candidates

John Boehner Says The GOP Should Be More 'Sensitive' To Women, Support Gay Candidates

Commented Dec 5, 2013 at 16:43:29 in Politics

“For a while now, I have suggested that members of Congress on both sides of the aisle, and the President, too could benefit from mediation of some type to address what seems to be intractable impasses.”
Tremaine McMillian, 14-Year-Old With Puppy, Choked By Miami-Dade Police Over 'Dehumanizing Stares' (VIDEO)

Tremaine McMillian, 14-Year-Old With Puppy, Choked By Miami-Dade Police Over 'Dehumanizing Stares' (VIDEO)

Commented May 31, 2013 at 16:07:00 in Miami

“Thanks for the feedback, Mr.James King. I agree with your critique of my writing style, and it is well taken. I write primarily for scholarly audiences. I should alter my style when posting for general audiences. I will try to be more mindful of this.”
Tremaine McMillian, 14-Year-Old With Puppy, Choked By Miami-Dade Police Over 'Dehumanizing Stares' (VIDEO)

Tremaine McMillian, 14-Year-Old With Puppy, Choked By Miami-Dade Police Over 'Dehumanizing Stares' (VIDEO)

Commented May 31, 2013 at 07:35:54 in Miami

“Please note the last sentence of my above post should be revised to read as follows: Whether an officer labels a behavior as resistance, cooperative, or both, the question at hand, as I see it, is how shall that office participate in their interaction in ways that the contexts might be diffused?””
Tremaine McMillian, 14-Year-Old With Puppy, Choked By Miami-Dade Police Over 'Dehumanizing Stares' (VIDEO)

Tremaine McMillian, 14-Year-Old With Puppy, Choked By Miami-Dade Police Over 'Dehumanizing Stares' (VIDEO)

Commented May 31, 2013 at 07:29:22 in Miami

“I prefer not to speak to this case. Let me suggest, however, that the concept of resistance be conceptualized relationally rather than as a quality residing within an individual. People are not "resistive" unless another person defines behavior as such. Consider resistance has traditionally been defined in various mental health fields as oppositions to changes that have been prescribed by the clinician. In particular, resistance has been defined largely as the result of psychopathology within the client. Accordingly, resistance to change has been conceptualized as a clinical problem that needs to be identified and eliminated. In contrast, recent collaborative, strength-based approaches to counseling tend to view resistance as a byproduct of the client-counselor relationship rather than a sign of psychopathology within the client. Efforts have thus been made to use resistance in the direction of change. The concept of resistance has also been replaced with the concept of cooperating where client behavior is understood as their unique way of cooperating and it is the counselor's responsibility to collaborate with the client toward therapeutic ends. This conception can be applied in many contexts, including law enforcement. Granted, there are times when force will need to be used by police. Whether an office labels a behavior as resistance, cooperative, or both, the question at hand, as I see it, is how shall the office participate in the interaction in such as way that the context might be diffused?”

MrJames King on May 31, 2013 at 07:54:42

“You made some good points. Although...your writing style is very "clinical" and not "layman friendly."”

guterman on May 31, 2013 at 07:35:54

“Please note the last sentence of my above post should be revised to read as follows: Whether an officer labels a behavior as resistance, cooperative, or both, the question at hand, as I see it, is how shall that office participate in their interaction in ways that the contexts might be diffused?””
Religion & Brain: Belief Decreases With Analytical Thinking, Study Shows

Religion & Brain: Belief Decreases With Analytical Thinking, Study Shows

Commented Apr 28, 2012 at 07:43:19 in Science

“If one pauses, then stops, and thinks hard about the big questions, a result often is doubt and uncertainty. From an ontological perspective, how can I know with absolute certainty that there is or is not a God? I came to this conclusion when I was about seven years old. Sure, I could take a leap of faith, and I respect those that do. Absolutistic atheists seem to be doing the very same thing. For me, not-knowing does not mean that I know nothing; it only means that there are some things in the world that remain a mystery--and it's okay.”

Craig Koebelin on Apr 28, 2012 at 10:26:51

“We could be absolutely certain there was a God if he manifested hiimself! In the scriptures supposedly he could talk from the sky, or as a burning bush (Zoroastrian-style), with no ambiguity. Now we have to speculate, because the almighty has developed a strange shyness.”
When It Comes to Mass Murder, Think Method and Means, Not Motive

When It Comes to Mass Murder, Think Method and Means, Not Motive

Commented Apr 10, 2014 at 19:09:12 in Politics

“I largely agree with the points made in your article. However, the fourth paragraph of the article reads as follows:

"But often enough, the mass murderer is (like this week's knife-wielding Pennsylvania schoolboy) someone with no preexisting risk factors, has no special special current stressors, and is part of a loving family."

To clarify, no one has yet died from the stabbings from the students; hence, he is not a mass murdered. Also, it is not yet known if he does or does not have preexisting risk factors, special current stressors, or a loving family. Until a thorough evaluation of this student is completed, we simply do not know.”
Two Requests in Light of Recent Events

Two Requests in Light of Recent Events

Commented Nov 17, 2013 at 11:18:56 in Media

“Alec Baldwin: In your post, you stated, "The press never turns the camera around on themselves." This is not quite accurate. It would be more fair to say that the press seldom turns the camera around on themselves. And this is the nature of humans. We tend to focus on the other rather than ourselves. I appreciate that you took the time to make a blog post about what has been happening between you, your family, and the media. It seems to me that it is not helpful to view the problem as you or them. Rather, it is a relational thing between you and the media. Don't ask me to say who started it. That's like asking who started a fight between a couple: It depends on where one chooses to punctuate the stream of events, and that is a largely subjective bias. What is true is that the only person one can control and change is themselves. The question at hand is how do you choose to participate in a culture that is, as you rightly point out is obsessed with celebrity? A lot of your choices reinforce some reactions on the part of the press. Again, I appreciate you taking the time to share your views. I loved you in Glengarry Glen Ross.”
huffingtonpost entry

Can Narcissists Change?

Commented Sep 15, 2013 at 10:54:16 in Healthy Living

“When you refer in your reply above to so-called "narcissists" it seems to amount to an over-generalization as if a person not only might exhibit a trait or traits at a moment in time but, taken all together, such traits necessarily define them globally as a narcissist. There is no such thing. Naming a client as such creates a separation between the clinician and the client.

Regarding self-esteem which you refer to, I suggest most definitions of this concept seem to set people up for poor results. I suggest clients work on self-acceptance, not self-esteem: http://youtu.be/z4AOwmqTGPY
huffingtonpost entry

Can Narcissists Change?

Commented Sep 10, 2013 at 18:12:27 in Healthy Living

“I suggest that to a large extent, a clinician's mental health diagnosis says as much, if not more about the clinician than it does about the client being diagnosed. There are no narcissists in psychiatric nosology. Rather, there are clients who meet the diagnostic criteria for narcissistic personality disorder. But what does this diagnosis tell us about the unique aspects of the person? One of the greatest impediments to change when working with such clients is the expectations of some of the clinicians working with them. Personality is a large problem definition and changing a life-long pattern of being is a large goal. What does the client wish to work on?”

hp blogger Dr. Craig Malkin on Sep 15, 2013 at 08:26:15

“Agreed. It gets especially thorny with trait measures. Even within narcissism scales, the profile seems to sort people into two variations, one more grandiose, the other more vulnerable (although that’s entirely consistent with how narcissism is thought to work). The former narcissists don't even seem to be in touch with how fragile their self-esteem is (they show no understanding that true confidence doesn't *require* disowning every imperfection or error).

In the end, therapists can only work with clients where they are, regardless of what the diagnosis suggests”
NIMH vs DSM-5: No One Wins, Patients Lose

NIMH vs DSM-5: No One Wins, Patients Lose

Commented May 11, 2013 at 11:13:49 in Science

“Very good points.”
NIMH vs DSM-5: No One Wins, Patients Lose

NIMH vs DSM-5: No One Wins, Patients Lose

Commented May 11, 2013 at 10:06:47 in Science

“There is compelling evidence to suggest that some of the mental disorders set forth in the DSM-5 are brain disease (e.g., schizophrenia). Most of the so-called mental disorders in the DSM-5, however, do not reside in patient's minds but, rather, were socially constructed by the authors of the diagnostic manual itself. I am hoping for a day when advances in neuroscience and medicine will make it possible to rename schizophrenia in relation to an anomaly of brain functioning and structure. Like any medical illness, schizophrenia involves a deviation from normal function or structure of an organ, body part, or biological system. Medical nomenclature rather than pathologizing psychiatric jargon seems so much more fitting for a brain disease and would bypass the negative connotation of the term schizophrenia.”
An Atheist Muslim's Perspective on the 'Root Causes' of Islamist Jihadism and the Politics of Islamophobia

An Atheist Muslim's Perspective on the 'Root Causes' of Islamist Jihadism and the Politics of Islamophobia

Commented May 11, 2013 at 08:49:05 in World

“Right, religion is not for me, although I respect aspects of religious institutions and I do participate in some religious activities with my family. I appreciate we could have a respectful conversation. I wish you the very best.”
An Atheist Muslim's Perspective on the 'Root Causes' of Islamist Jihadism and the Politics of Islamophobia

An Atheist Muslim's Perspective on the 'Root Causes' of Islamist Jihadism and the Politics of Islamophobia

Commented May 4, 2013 at 23:59:00 in World

“I am not referring necessarily to a religious doctrine itself. I am referring to instances when human beings, because of--or I might say, despite of--their religious beliefs engage in behaviors that clearly infringe on the rights of others. An example is when a person is so absolutist in their belief that they are abusive or aggressive toward another. Many people are also abusive toward themselves when they do not act in accord with their chosen religious doctrines, again, largely because of their absolutism. They tell themselves something along the lines of, "I absolutely must follow this doctrine and because I didn't, it makes me a completely bad person deserving of severe blame!" If someone wants to follow the doctrines, fine. It's the irrational, demands that humans attach to them that I have trouble with.”
An Atheist Muslim's Perspective on the 'Root Causes' of Islamist Jihadism and the Politics of Islamophobia

An Atheist Muslim's Perspective on the 'Root Causes' of Islamist Jihadism and the Politics of Islamophobia

Commented May 4, 2013 at 17:36:43 in World

“The problem I have with some, hardly all, aspects of religion are those beliefs that are absolutist and which therefore contribute to practices that infringe on human rights. I think my position is in keeping with Ali A. Rizvi's brilliant article.”

Travis Merriman on May 4, 2013 at 20:51:27

“Amen.”

teddyboylocsin on May 4, 2013 at 20:18:46

“If your belief is not absolute, I guess religion is not for you, that's fine. In Christianity the end is the descent of the Kingdom of Heaven on planet earth and really there isn't all that much room when all the righteous dead come to life to join the right living.”
huffingtonpost entry

TED Relents, But Whose Hash Has Been Settled?

Commented Apr 22, 2013 at 22:00:24 in Media

“Your distinction between the separation and inclusion of the observer in science and humanities, respectively, is fundamental. Atheists and agnostics are found in both camps, science and humanities. Most scientists recognize the value of subjectivity, qualitative research, art, and other domains in the humanities on their own for influencing and being informed by science. What's all the fuss?”
huffingtonpost entry

TED, Censorship, Consciousness, Militant Atheists, and Pseudo Science!

Commented Apr 21, 2013 at 21:58:06 in Science

“Nice response and well written.”
huffingtonpost entry

Dear TED, Is It 'Bad Science' or a 'Game of Thrones'?

Commented Apr 21, 2013 at 16:05:34 in Science

“What's all the fuss? Also, let's hear some support for not-knowing which does not mean that one does not know anything.”
Pressing The Bar

Pressing The Bar

Commented Feb 11, 2013 at 10:15:33 in Healthy Living

“I think and hope that will be an option.”
Pressing The Bar

Pressing The Bar

Commented Feb 10, 2013 at 17:40:05 in Healthy Living

“For thousands of years, we have used technologies to transcend human limitations. Indeed, technology has always been a double-edged sword. At this time in history, however, a new problem--and opportunity!--faces our species, namely, that the pace of technological development is so fast that we can hardly keep up. Futurist Alvin Toffler called this "future shock." In other words, our biology is not equipped to handle the social and technological change that is occurring and, moreover, will likely happen in the next half century. If Dr. Weil is concerned about repetitive usage of social media, he will become alarmed as human begin to have computers embedded in their brains. This is already happening for individuals with Parkinson's disease. In the future, most of us will be able to upload artificial intelligence in our brains. The result will be a gradual integration between body and machine. It's not going to be about "us" and "them" but, rather, our convergence into transhumans and eventually posthumans. I suggest we need to find ways to become increasingly flexible and adaptive so we can handle the coming changes, what futurist Ray Kurzweil calls accelerating change. We need to develop ways of understanding that challenge taken-for-granted assumptions about what it means to be human, the relationship between body and machine, and other time-honored beliefs and practices that are being thrown into critical relief.”

spiritualized on Feb 11, 2013 at 00:15:55

“silence is way too enjoyable to be bombarded with technological non-sense no matter how entertaining it may seem.”

spiritualized on Feb 11, 2013 at 00:15:08

“i am pretty sure i would opt out of replacing my humanity with machine.”
Patch and Starbucks Ask Washington to 'Come Together' to Avoid Fiscal Cliff

Patch and Starbucks Ask Washington to 'Come Together' to Avoid Fiscal Cliff

Commented Dec 27, 2012 at 08:20:18 in Politics

“Writing "Come Together" on each and every Starbucks cup is a great idea. I suggest that the staff also be required to sing The Beatles' song, Come Together and encourage customers to do the same. Even better, Obama, Boehner, and the entire Congress ought to be commanded to sing this song in front of the public until they strike a deal.”
huffingtonpost entry

270 Chicago Children Killed by Guns Since 2007

Commented Dec 26, 2012 at 17:49:17 in Chicago

“Time will tell if the recent increase in mass shootings are random or, instead, reflective of a significant trend. For now, I am concerned about the seeming overemphasis that many people and institutions have placed, especially some in the media, on mass shootings. An FBI study cited in USA Today found that mass killings (i.e., four or more people killed in one incident) occur in the United States about every two weeks, yet the majority of these incidents receive little or no attention from the media. This study showed that despite the frequency of these mass killings, they comprise only 1% of the approximately 15,000 annual homicides in the United States. The Newtown shooting struck a nerve throughout the nation, and for good reasons. I am concerned, however, that we are allowing emotions to distract us from the bigger picture about violence, namely, that overall, homicides have been steadily decreasing in the United States and there is much to be done in addition to--and beyond--reforming gun laws and militarizing our schools. A more solution-focused approach to the problem of violence might involve investigating precisely why homicide rates have dropped in recent years, identifying positive factors that have contributed to less killing in our society, and building on such progress.”

LATEACHER1X on Dec 26, 2012 at 23:42:19

“Good points, but don't count on the media for help.”
Do You Want to Be Immortal? Really?

Do You Want to Be Immortal? Really?

Commented Aug 2, 2012 at 21:05:29 in Science

“I want the option to live forever. Perhaps, to go in and out. By the way, I don't this article belongs in the "weird news" section.”
Psychiatrists Say DSM Needs Overhaul, Should Be Re-Thought

Psychiatrists Say DSM Needs Overhaul, Should Be Re-Thought

Commented May 18, 2012 at 10:47:24 in Healthy Living

“Yes, good point.”
Psychiatrists Say DSM Needs Overhaul, Should Be Re-Thought

Psychiatrists Say DSM Needs Overhaul, Should Be Re-Thought

Commented May 11, 2012 at 07:47:18 in Healthy Living

“What's the goal here? If the aim is to "get it right," then DSM will always need an overhaul. Let me explain.

The DSM is a system of if-then criteria that have been socially constructed by those persons who have the knowledge/power (see Foucualt) to ascribe pathologizing labels to clinical phenomena. In effect, any given DSM category is tautological (i.e., circular and irrefutable) as long as its if-then propositions are upheld. What is all too forgotten, however, is that its community of stakeholders has created the if-then conditions in the first place. When this happens, the DSM diagnoses become reified. Any so-called truth regarding whether or not such categories exist is made legitimate merely by its community of stakeholders' proclivity to describe clients, human beings accordingly. From this perspective, psychopathology does not exist in the minds or the brains or the behavior of individuals but, rather in the hands of the professional community that created the criteria in the first place.

Adapted from:

Guterman, J. T. (1994). A social constructionist position for mental health counseling. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 16, 226-244.”

poomplet on May 14, 2012 at 08:59:01

“The 'stakeholders' involved in drafting DSM-5 include the drug companies...it's a fact.”
huffingtonpost entry

Woo Woo Is a Step Ahead of (Bad) Science

Commented Dec 28, 2009 at 11:47:16 in Healthy Living

“I thought you might have had a study or a theory article to cite that supports your view that it is percpetion, not the placebo, that creates change. Perhaps there are no such works that you are aware of and if this is the case, then fine. Your posts here serve to make the point. I am in agreement. Your point is very well made.”
next
1 - 25