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hp blogger Craig Cooper's Comments

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huffingtonpost entry

Why Do Vegetarians Live Longer?

Commented Oct 28, 2012 at 16:20:41 in Healthy Living

“We are huge supporters of a plant based diet for men at www.prostate.net and it's just not longevity; its "Quality of Life" from feeling and living healthy. We are the largest website for men's prostate health and huge promotors of men's health but unfortunately most men do not make changes until it is too late. Our motto is "Don't Wait Until you Get Sick to Get Healthy" as by then it's often too late. When will everybody wake up and actually stop just reading the headlines and studies but also start making changes to how they eat and live. Its a fact that diet influences cancer risk. If you want to minimize your risk you need to make changes now; not when you hear the "C" word!”

Cuthbert on Oct 28, 2012 at 19:30:33

“Over then next decade you will be surprised to hear that it isn't meat, but sugar and excessive refined carbohydrate that is the major contributor to cancer. The studies are already under way. Won't it be interesting to see how much exercise will occur due to all of the backpedaling :p”
Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Commented Nov 1, 2010 at 20:42:58 in Home

“I have a whole section on BPA at my blog at http://www.prostate.net/blog/tag/bpa/ and its a personal mission of mine to get the word out about BPA. I also post a lot about it at http://www.facebook.com/prostatenet where you can see 2 of the last 3 posts were on BPA. I also have a whole section on BPA on the www.prostate.net website due to launch in 3 weeks so sign up at the blog for an update on the launch. BPA, as you know, is an estrogen promoter just like soy. I hope you are doing well. Best. Craig”
Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Commented Nov 1, 2010 at 16:25:44 in Home

“Jay, will do and great article btw.”
Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Commented Nov 1, 2010 at 16:00:05 in Home

“You make an interesting point but it’s important to note that most of the research shows that testosterone itself does not cause prostate cancer although it is in the equation. More important is the relationship between testosterone and DHT as well as the balance of estrogen/estradiol to testosterone in men. Phytoestrogens, which are estrogen-like compounds found in plants and soybeans and soybean products (e.g., tofu, soy beverages) are estrogen promoters which can upset the hormone balance and lead to cancer and BPH in men. Low testosterone also provides the environment for an increase in estradiol for those on a diet rich in phytoestrogens.”

sviolette on Nov 1, 2010 at 18:15:24

“BPA (bisphenol A) is also a source of prostate cancer. It's in every can you open. It's in just about every person's system from infants to adults. I got prostate cancer from working in a plastics manufacturing plant. Why aren't more people that are concerned with men's health issues talking about that?”
Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Commented Nov 1, 2010 at 15:13:40 in Home

“Rezna, I don't drink it anymore and use rice milk, when needed, so sorry I can't help on this one.”

rezna on Nov 2, 2010 at 13:44:56

“Craig, thanks for your response. I'll try some rice milks again.”
Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Commented Nov 1, 2010 at 11:34:23 in Home

“I agree but that's not my point. Just like the US takes the best comedies and makes them their own (ie. The Office: yes the English version is much funnier!); so too with Soy. Asians don't eat soy like we do here, massively processed, added and fortified to all sorts of food as a marketing brand to catch your eye in the supermarket. Take a look at http://www.prostate.net/blog/2010/gensoy-protein-bar-prostate-cancer/ the leading Soy snack. This is not what Asian kids grew up on. You can't compare Asia to the US as they are completely different foods that are being consumed. "Soy is not Soy in the US" in the majority of manufactured foods. That's the point I was trying to get across.”

entreMundo on Nov 1, 2010 at 19:20:36

“While I understand that that is the common perception, I'd suggest checking out 7-11 or other supermarket next time you take a trip to Thailand/Malaysia/Taiwan/Japan etc. Sadly there are indeed all kinds of manufactured "gimmick" soy products (I counted over two dozen varieties in a single store in Kuala Lumpur once), filled with sugar, cow's milk(!) and artificial flavors, in addition to other widespread means of consumption like fresh-brewed street soymilk (yummm).

So unfortunately, even if it is a newish trend towards these kinds of manufactured soythings, Asian kids are now growing up on them... guess we'll have to see where that goes.”
Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Commented Nov 1, 2010 at 10:48:02 in Home

“Maybe, but in the hands of the US Industrial Food System where soy has become a brand rather than a food don't think that just because you are eating something with "soy" on it that you are doing yourself a favor. That is the message I was trying to put across. Read the label on any "Soy Protein Bar" or other "snack" and the benefits of soy are heavily outweighed by the additives, colors, HFCS and preservatives. And "too much of a good thing" CAN be bad when the "mild" estrogenic effects add up over time. Breast and prostate cancers are hormone driven and anything that upsets the hormone balance is a concern.”
Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Soy: When It's Good, When It's Bad, And How To Tell

Commented Nov 1, 2010 at 10:38:31 in Home

“There is a lot of focus on Asian diets and the benefits of soy. Many people have assumed from the China Study findings that the plant-based foods that seemed to keep people healthy in this study were soybean-based; that is, primarily tofu, as well as miso, which is a fermented soybean product. However, according to a 1998 survey, it seems that the average daily amount of legumes (soybeans are a legume) consumed in China varied from 9 to 58 grams. Assuming that two-thirds of legume consumption is soybeans, then the maximum amount of soy foods the Chinese were consuming was 40 grams, or less than three tablespoons per day. The average amount was 9 grams, or less than two teaspoons. The Chinese have traditionally used soy foods as a condiment, and these results bear that out. (Fallon 2000) You will not find a Chinese family sitting down to an 8-ounce slab of tofu like you will see an American sitting with an 8-ounce sirloin on his plate. The conclusions of the researchers with The China Study were not wrong: a plant-based diet that keeps meat, processed foods, and high-fat foods as a very small part of the menu is a healthy way to eat. But soybeans are only a very small part of those plant-based foods. The majority of the diet consists of vegetables, rice, fruits, and noodles, along with garlic and ginger.”
Pink House: White House To Become 'Pink House' For Breast Cancer Month

Pink House: White House To Become 'Pink House' For Breast Cancer Month

Commented Oct 19, 2010 at 15:31:23 in Healthy Living

“Last month when representatives of ZERO and Prostate Cancer Foundation were in Washington for Prostate Cancer Awareness Month the White House refused to light itself blue> The numbers for breast and prostate cancer are similar http://www.prostate.net/blog/2010/prostate-cancer-statistics/ so what gives?”
POM Juice Ads Are Deceptive About Health, Says FTC

POM Juice Ads Are Deceptive About Health, Says FTC

Commented Oct 11, 2010 at 23:28:40 in Home

“Pomegranate actually does have clinical studies outside of POM's studies for prostate health. See http://www.prostate.net/blog/2010/pomegranate-prostate-cancer-psa/ My concern is that an 8oz serving of POM has 160 calories and 32 grams of sugar which is a massive amount for an 8oz serving. That's 8 tspns of sugar in a small glass sized serving which is not healthy no matter what you serve it with!”
A Fruitful Answer to Obesity

A Fruitful Answer to Obesity

Commented Oct 9, 2010 at 20:19:26 in Home

“In a lot of cases, weight gain is not a mystery. I wouldn't focus on criticizing the calories in/out statement. Eat less, exercise more is not the total solution for all but it is in a significant number of people. There are a number of positive steps noted in the article all towards getting people to eat better and while you may disagree on the nature of what that means; it does mean eating less and more healthful foods including fruits and vegetables which are significantly under-consumed (go ahead, count how many you have had today) and reading labels and nutritional quantities/sugar components/serving portion size etc. Average food portion size and calories per portion have nearly tripled in the last 40 years. Walk around Disneyland in California and the people who are obese are generally not the ones eating the small portions, salads and fruit and more often than not have the giant deep fried turkey dog. Yes there are lots of reasons for the rampant obesity in the country but if you can educate those people that are just sedentary and eat too much then that's a positive step. I have stood and watched people buying McDonald's for 30 minutes and order portions are substantially correlated to body size. As long as the message is that there is no solution/its too complicated and it's not your fault then there won't be any passion, reason and energy to take responsibility for your own health.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Hefty Price of Obesity

Commented Oct 8, 2010 at 14:19:46 in Healthy Living

“Also from the CDC report:
Obesity is associated with onset of knee osteoarthritis (the most common type of arthritis), disease progression, disability, total knee joint replacement, and poor clinical outcomes after knee joint replacement, and likely has a critical role in the increasing impact of arthritis on disability, health-related quality of life, and health-care costs (5). Lifetime risk for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis alone is 60.5% among persons who are obese, double the risk for those of normal/underweight (6). Because even small amounts of weight loss (approximately 11 lbs [5 kg]) can reduce the risk for incident knee osteoarthritis among women by 50% (7) and might also reduce mortality risk in osteoarthritis patients by half (8), large-scale clinical and community efforts to prevent and treat obesity as recommended by the National Institutes of Health¶ might reduce the obesity-related burden and impact of arthritis in the population.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Hefty Price of Obesity

Commented Oct 8, 2010 at 13:54:37 in Healthy Living

“According to the CDC http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5939a1.htm?s_cid=mm5939a1_w, the number of adults with arthritis has also increased by nearly one million per year and it is impacting the activities of 21 million adults. Arthritis also carries a heavy financial burden, costing the economy $128 billion annually. 67 million Americans are projected to have arthritis by 2030.

Among the report's findings from 2007 to 2009:

* 50 million U.S. adults (or 22 percent of the population) have arthritis, up from 46 million in 2003-2005

* Arthritis affects the daily activities of 21 million adults, up significantly from 19 million in 2003-2005. This includes:

o 9.4% of the total adult population
o 42.4% of adults with arthritis
o BMI (body mass index) influences prevalence of arthritis
o 29.6 percent of obese adults have arthritis (one in three)
o 19.8 percent of overweight adults have arthritis (one in five)
o 16.9 percent of normal/underweight adults have arthritis (one in six)”
Real Men Drink Green Tea

Real Men Drink Green Tea

Commented Oct 3, 2010 at 16:10:50 in Healthy Living

“Here is the supplement I use http://www.amazon.com/Mason-Vitamins-Sencha-Capsules-60-Count/dp/B003XXLXES/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1286136004&sr=1-1-spell
Green Tea (Camellia sinensis) 500 mg leaves providing: Total Polyphenols 490mg, Catechins 375mg, EGCG 200mg, Caffeine-not more than 2.5mg. It is the highest polyphenol/catechin content I have found. A 2007 report published by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) analyzed nearly 400 foods for their EGCG content and found that one cup of normal green tea had approximately 180 milligrams of EGCG. It seems then that you can maximize EGCG through supplements but natural sources are always best in my view.”

Beachside Cali on Oct 3, 2010 at 18:53:57

“thank you for this information...I kinda figured natural sources are better. I just have to get use to drinking 3-5 a day.”
Real Men Drink Green Tea

Real Men Drink Green Tea

Commented Sep 28, 2010 at 19:22:11 in Healthy Living

“For me, one tea bag is one cup although you can keep using the same bag until the dilution is too great. I generally use 2-3 tea bags steeped overnight in a plunger the size of this one http://www.furniturestoreblog.com/2008/02/07/affordable­_french_pr­ess_coffee­_makers_by­_bodum.html
And I make 2 of these with green tea and one with white tea. Enjoy!”
Real Men Drink Green Tea

Real Men Drink Green Tea

Commented Sep 28, 2010 at 19:18:37 in Healthy Living

“Great advice and it's all a matter of personal preference and the lengthy steeping doesn't matter if you are making a smoothie rather than drinking it straight. Agree it can get strong but it's all a matter of personal preference.”
10 Things That Can Make Incontinence Worse

10 Things That Can Make Incontinence Worse

Commented Sep 28, 2010 at 11:46:21 in Healthy Living

Real Men Drink Green Tea

Real Men Drink Green Tea

Commented Sep 28, 2010 at 11:09:19 in Healthy Living

“Sorry about that. I just use a Coffee Press. Must be my New Zealand slang. Like this one http://www.furniturestoreblog.com/2008/02/07/affordable_french_press_coffee_makers_by_bodum.html
huffingtonpost entry

To Sun or Not To Sun? A Rascally Question

Commented Sep 27, 2010 at 18:49:11 in Healthy Living

“You can read more on prostate cancer and vitamin D here http://www.prostate.net/blog/2010/vitamin-d-and-prostate-cancer/. You don't need supplementation if you get adequate sunshine and studies have shown that those living in the Northern latitudes have higher rates of prostate cancer given possibly due to the lesser exposure to sunlight.”

Tungsten33 on Sep 28, 2010 at 16:28:58

“Getting adequate sunshine is harder than you think. Most have to work during the day so it's not like they can go out and sunbath in hot weather at midday and come back to work all sweaty so supplement is probably a necessary. UVB sunlight is weak or nonexistent during the cool months so you still need to take supplement anyway. Also living in the cities that have air pollution which could block UVB partially.”
huffingtonpost entry

From Stage 4 to Cancer-Free: One Man's Plant-Based Recovery

Commented Sep 25, 2010 at 00:30:44 in Healthy Living

“That s a great story. At www.prostate.net we are trying to give men the tools to live a life of maximum wellness and making changes to lifestyle "before" they get a disease. We are big believers that you should "live like you have cancer, even if you don't". It's a statement that promotes a life of maximum wellness recognizing that you shouldn't have to wait until you are ill to make lifestyle changes. Meditate today, eat nutritious foods, avoid exposure to toxins, exercise, maintain hormonal balance and all these things will benefit you today: whether or not you have a disease.”

megwolff on Sep 25, 2010 at 07:01:55

“Godd morning, Craig,
Well said! I like this best: "We are big believers that you should "live like you have cancer, even if you don't". It's a statement that promotes a life of maximum wellness recognizing that you shouldn't have to wait until you are ill to make lifestyle changes."”
huffingtonpost entry

America: A Big, Fat, Stupid Nation

Commented Sep 25, 2010 at 00:20:22 in Healthy Living

“Having captured a monopoly on turning traditional eating patterns and food into an industrial complex, big corporations are now moving in on the organic and natural food markets. Walking around any of the "natural" food and organic expos will show you that most of the once sustainable and true organic food companies have now been purchased by big industry players. And most of the start ups in the natural food industry now want to emulate the Vitamin Water model (get big and sell for a lot) rather than the Clif Bar model of staying core and true to their values and promoting sustainability and quality of ingredients. Soy has become a "brand" rather than a food and is being pumped into our food supply without any concerns over the heath and hormonal effects of over-consumption.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Hefty Price of Obesity

Commented Sep 23, 2010 at 20:59:51 in Healthy Living

“Shannon,
You can start here http://www.diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/riskfortype2/index.htm as well as most major sites dedicated to diabetes prevention that recognize the higher risk of developing the disease if you are overweight. To say that weight loss has no impact on development or prevention is simply not the case. I don't think there would be a single health professional that would advise someone at high risk (i.e being overweight as ONE of the risk factors) not to lose weight as part of a preventative program. See also http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11333990. Yes, its complicated, thin and fat, but it's about reducing the risk factors that are specific to the individual; and if you are overweight you are at higher risk. Even the Obesity Society states "Carrying extra body weight and body fat go hand and hand with the development of type 2 diabetes" http://www.obesity.org/information/diabetes_obesity.asp and that 90% of people with Type 2 are overweight.”

Atchka on Sep 24, 2010 at 11:04:26

“Finally, the claim that weight plays a role in diabetes does not explain the prevalence of diabetes in Japan, which has the lowest rate of obesity among developed nations.

"Though Japan has some of the world’s lowest rates of obesity — less than 5 percent, compared to nearly 35 percent for the United States — people here on average have gotten heavier in the past three decades, according to government statistics. More worrisome, in a nation that is aging faster than any other because of long life spans and low birth rates, the number of people with diabetes has risen from 6.9 million in 1997 to 8.9 million last year."

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/japan/091109/fat-japan-youre-breaking-the-law

If Japan has a population of 127,420,000, then that means they have a diabetes rate of 7%, which is not significantly less than our rate of 7.8%.

For all of these reasons, and many, many more,making diabetes an issue of weight, rather than lifestyle or genetics, is shifting the focus to an unproductive area. Yes, being overweight is a risk factor, but considering the fact that insulin resistance causes weight gain, it is doubtful that increased weight in and of itself is a cause of diabetes.

Peace,
Shannon
FierceFatties.com”

Atchka on Sep 24, 2010 at 10:59:38

“So, in essence, they are saying your risk for getting diabetes begins at a BMI of 22, which is just four points above the underweight category. Add to that the fact that 1/3 of those with diabetes are in the Normal category or under, and the role of weight in diabetes gets even muddier.

Regarding the impact of exercise, there are multiple studies that indicate quite strongly that the health effects of diabetes are mitigated exercise *regardless of weight loss*.

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=18027
http://www.bpgastro.com/article/S1521-6918%2804%2900083-6/abstract
http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/reprint/10/3/267

This is partially due to the changes in body composition (lean muscle replacing fat), but regardless of the reason, advising weight loss as a means of controlling diabetes is misleading and dangerous. And regarding your claim that there is not a single health professional that would advise someone at high risk not to lose weight, I can point to two: Dr. Arya Sharma and Dr. Steven Blair.

Dr. Sharma is Professor of Medicine & Chair for Cardiovascular Obesity Research and Management at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. He is also the Medical Director of the Edmonton Capital Health Region’s interdisciplinary Weight Wise Program. Dr. Blair was a leading member of the Cooper Institute, and is one of the most widely cited researchers in exercise fitness.

I have interviewed them both: http://atchka.podbean.com

(continued)”

Atchka on Sep 24, 2010 at 10:51:10

“First of all, try finding diabetes/BMI rate information and you're going to get different answers. The link you posted for The Obesity Society (which was initially funded almost entirely by the pharmaceutical industry) does not cite where they get that 90% figure. I have found multiple sites that say that about 2/3 of those with diabetes are overweight. Oddly enough, our nation is 2/3 in the overweight category. But the risk is higher for people in the obese category, you are correct. 46% of those with Type 2 Diabetes are obese.

But let's put that in perspective. About 17 million people have diabetes. 46% of that is 7,820,000. There are 73 million obese people, which means just 10% of obese people have diabetes. If diabetes were caused by obesity, you would expect that figure to be higher.

Furthermore, if I rely on The Obesity Society's website, it says that the prevalance of obesity in those with a BMI between 25-29 is 2%. This same site says that "Data from the Nurses Health Study demonstrated that the risk of diabetes begins to increase in "normal" weight women when BMI exceeds 22 kg/m²."

http://www.obesity.org/statistics/obesity_trends.asp

(continued)”
huffingtonpost entry

The Hefty Price of Obesity

Commented Sep 23, 2010 at 14:21:52 in Healthy Living

“Correction: I meat to say "less prone to triggering" not "more prone"
Have a great day”
huffingtonpost entry

The Hefty Price of Obesity

Commented Sep 23, 2010 at 14:19:20 in Healthy Living

“Type 2 is a more and more a modern day disease which has genetic underlinks but also, environmental and lifestyle triggers. Fat and thin people may carry the marker and the fat person who is happy may be more prone to triggering the disease than the depressed skinny person. Lifestyle, nutrition, exposure to chemicals etc all have impacts on hormonal and endocrine systems and can trigger gene mutations. And if you are pre-diabetic it is absolutely possible to prevent that being blown into full type 2 through diet and exercise and weight loss. I and many others have done it with no family history.”

Atchka on Sep 23, 2010 at 15:00:07

“Craig,
Type 2 is absolutely environmentally triggered. However, that trigger is the same for thin people as it is for fat people. Plus there are plenty of people with Type 2 diabetes who make the ideal lifestyle choices and STILL get it. In short, it's complicated. That's why I find it distasteful when people oversimplify diabetes as an obesity problem. It's not. It's a much broader problem than simply fat people and that message is not getting through.

Also, Type 2 diabetes can be controlled with diet and exercise, but weight loss has little to no impact on the disease. If you know of research indicating otherwise, please share, as I would like to know.

Peace,
Shannon”
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