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hp blogger Josh A. Goodman's Comments

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Tom Klansnic, Elementary School Principal, Allegedly Loses Contract Because He's Gay

Tom Klansnic, Elementary School Principal, Allegedly Loses Contract Because He's Gay

Commented Mar 8, 2013 at 21:28:34 in Gay Voices

“Having grown up in Oregon, I'm sad to see this. Fortunately, Oregon does have a law against employment discrimination based on sexual orientation, so Mr. Klansnic should be protected if his allegations are true. And if they're true, I hope that he has enough evidence to prove his case in court; that can be the tricky part.

If the Gresham-Barlow School District indeed did not renew the principal's contract based on his sexual orientation, they need to rethink their priorities. Sexual orientation has nothing to do with job performance, and discrimination is a form of intimidation. Plus, what a terrible message to send to the LGB youth in the district: that their own schools think that their sexual orientation is somehow bad, and a good enough reason to fire/not hire someone.”

dogtac69 on Mar 9, 2013 at 01:24:03

“If they did, indeed, let him go because he is gay, he will win any suit he files against them. All states need laws such as Oregon's.”
'And Then Came Tango,' Gay Penguin Play, Canceled By Texas School District

'And Then Came Tango,' Gay Penguin Play, Canceled By Texas School District

Commented Nov 13, 2012 at 00:00:44 in Gay Voices

“How sad that you cannot recognize love.

Your heterosexism is based on the notion that when two male or two female people love each other, that is unnatural. Newsflash: it isn't. The penguins from this play--based on a true story from penguins at a zoo in New York--are one such example.

I am going to take a guess that your religious beliefs are why you view homosexuality as immoral. Your religious beliefs should not shape any public school's curriculum, as there is a freedom of religion in this country. Some religions (such as the denomination of Judaism I was raised in) embrace families with lesbian and gay people, as do many Christian denominations and most people with no religion. By using religion to shape school curricula, the school system must privilege some religious beliefs over others, which is unconstitutional.

If you don't want public schools to teach about the existence of lesbian and gay parents, by that token, you should not want schools to read a story or show a play that has heterosexual parents. Otherwise, schools suggest that all families are led by heterosexual parents, and--regardless of how you feel--that's simply not true.”
'And Then Came Tango,' Gay Penguin Play, Canceled By Texas School District

'And Then Came Tango,' Gay Penguin Play, Canceled By Texas School District

Commented Nov 12, 2012 at 20:53:34 in Gay Voices

“This is a clear example of unequal treatment. There are a whole slew of children's books, plays, cartoons, etc., which depict a nuclear family with a mom, dad, and kids. "And Then Came Tango" is simply an objective portrayal of another family structure.

It is essential that, rather than privileging one type of family, schools affirm that all family types are good so long as they are safe and loving. This is important for exposing kids who come from one type of background to the diversity of families that exist (and not just gay parents, but single parents, kids who live with their grandparents, adoptive families, etc). Just as importantly, this is a great deal of help to kids of lesbian and gay parents, who may feel more appreciated about having a different family structure and may be teased less often when their classmates gain this exposure, and to kids who will grow up to be lesbian, gay, or bisexual, as it affirms that they, too, can find love, have a family, and lead a happy life.

And to whoever thinks this will lead to discussions about sex, that's ridiculous. Reading about nuclear families doesn't lead to detailed discussions about the missionary position or doggy style. If a child who is confused about seeing two daddies or two mommies asks about it, an age-appropriate answer is that just like a mommy and a daddy can love each other, sometimes two mommies or two daddies love each other.”

atlblackops on Nov 12, 2012 at 22:40:40

“sorry I don't consider immoral behavior safe and loving.

furthermore, schools should not be in the business of brainwashing our kids on all family types. Not all "family types are good". And that should be left up for the parents to decide, not school.”
UPS Halts Boy Scouts Donations Over Anti-Gay Policy

UPS Halts Boy Scouts Donations Over Anti-Gay Policy

Commented Nov 12, 2012 at 17:32:23 in Gay Voices

“It's not that simple. Boys join, usually because their parents or friends encourage them to, at a young age--often around seven or eight--long before most know what their sexual orientation is. Most people discover their sexual orientation as an adolescent. And even if a kid felt a little different or even knew he was gay at that age, you can't blame a seven year old for not knowing a big organization's policies.

Many long-time scouts find themselves in the undesirable situation of: 1) staying in the closet and not being true to themselves in order to stay involved in scouts and keep their good friends from scouts, or 2) be true to themselves and come out but get kicked out of scouts. Nobody should have to make that decision. It's great to see that corporations are standing up for gay/bi/questioning scouts and withdrawing their financial support until the organization stops discriminating against innocent kids.”

pookie01nj on Nov 13, 2012 at 09:20:57

“Both my boys were boy scouts when growing up. I guess things have really changed in the past 40/50 years. None of this went on when they were there.”
UPS Halts Boy Scouts Donations Over Anti-Gay Policy

UPS Halts Boy Scouts Donations Over Anti-Gay Policy

Commented Nov 12, 2012 at 16:56:16 in Gay Voices

“Frankly, this is what it's going to take for the Boy Scouts to change their discriminatory ways. A generalized public outcry clearly isn't enough, but I suspect that losing millions of dollars from prominent corporations, along with losing special treatment in public schools and having more and more families refuse to let their sons get involved, will get to them.

I thank UPS, Intel, and others for standing up against discrimination based on sexual orientation and religion. I hope that boys in the scouts that are hiding being gay or bisexual, or are questioning their sexual orientation, see that these corporations, in addition to millions of Americans, vehemently oppose such mistreatment, and that the problem lies with the BSA and not with themselves.”
10 Ways to Support Your Gay Kid, Whether You Know You Have One or Not

10 Ways to Support Your Gay Kid, Whether You Know You Have One or Not

Commented Jul 6, 2013 at 21:10:47 in Gay Voices

“This is spot on! I feel like many parents do not take that first step of considering, when a child is born, that she or he might be lesbian or gay (or bi/trans*/queer/etc), which makes it hard on the parents when the child comes out (the parents' hopes and dreams of them marrying someone of the opposite sex are squashed) and hard on the child (growing up in a household where it was assumed that they would be heterosexual, and possibly not having a great reaction upon coming out). Hopefully, with more people being out and more acceptance of LGBTQ people/fewer people thinking it's a choice, fewer people will make these assumptions.”
The Harm of Homophobic Sex Ed

The Harm of Homophobic Sex Ed

Commented May 1, 2013 at 14:11:55 in Gay Voices

“Hi Andygirl A,
That is a great question. The Alabama law, and the other prejudiced state sex education laws, mention sexual orientation but not gender identity. While I doubt that many schools in those states are teaching trans-affirming sex education, such laws do not require that schools with sex ed teach that being transgender is wrong/unhealthy/illegal. As I said in the piece, I do hope states and schools adopt LGBT-inclusive sex education; I agree that it could help to address the high rates of bullying that trans students experience.

-Josh”
Why I Like Purim as a Queer, Secular Jew

Why I Like Purim as a Queer, Secular Jew

Commented Feb 24, 2013 at 16:51:30 in Gay Voices

“Hi frankieboy26: I can certainly see why you're not comfortable with the word, given some of its meanings/its history. The word "queer" is in a somewhat unusual place right now, having been a negative epithet (e.g., strange, unusual in a bad way) but now being reclaimed by many LGBTQ people. Admittedly, being a student probably biases me here, as academia tends to use the word "queer" as an umbrella term for sexual and gender minorities moreso than the rest of society.

How exciting that you get to celebrate all the holidays with your husband; I hope you enjoyed your poppy seed hamentashen this year! I made blueberry hamentashen for the first time this year--I think they may be my new favorite.”
Why I Like Purim as a Queer, Secular Jew

Why I Like Purim as a Queer, Secular Jew

Commented Feb 24, 2013 at 14:50:36 in Gay Voices

“Hi Standish,

I identify as a queer man because that's what I am. Or, to be more specific, I am on the continuum between straight and gay. You suggest that it would be more empowering if I called myself gay, but it would actually be less so, because that doesn't fully represent my experiences of attraction.

You do not get to decide if I am "truly proud of who [I am]." What you say is both ignorant and intolerant of the great diversity that exists in human experiences of sexuality/sexual orientation.

-Josh”

frankieboy26 on Feb 24, 2013 at 16:14:54

“Josh, you can call yourself queer if that's what floats your boat. Personally, I don't like the word for myself. I'm not queer (unusual or out of the norm). My husband is half Italian and half Jewish, so we get to celebrate everything. By the way, my favorite hamentashen is with poppy seeds. Yum. Happy Purim to you and your loved ones.”
AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

Commented Dec 6, 2012 at 02:15:19 in Gay Voices

“If a person says that being gay is bad, they think that being heterosexual is better, unless they also think being heteroesxual is equally bad (or worse).

The article isn't about LGB prejudice against heterosexual people, but you are right that it definitely happens. A major distinction between heterosexism and homosexism (the belief that lesbian/gay people are superior to people of other sexual orientations): many heterosexist people combine their anti-gay beliefs with their power as a majority group member to oppress LGB people, ranging from parents treating their gay son poorly to lawmakers refusing to give equal rights to LGBTQ people. However, LGB people are not oppressing straight people. Can you find an isolated case where a gay person discriminated against a straight person--maybe didn't hire them for a job, or treated them poorly for being straight. Certainly. And that's not right. But it is not a repetitive, institutional pattern based on a group of people with power using that power combined with beliefs of superiority to limit the power of a minority group.

If you don't like all of this because of what you call the victim mentality, then please join me in supporting equal rights for LGBTQ people and for eradicating the belief that any particular sexual orientation is better than another. Otherwise, you're just another instigator of that oppression you seem to be telling LGBTQ people to get over.”
AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

Commented Dec 3, 2012 at 23:17:44 in Gay Voices

“1) Who defines marriage? (Hint: it's not just any one person.)
2) Take a look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biology_and_sexual_orientation
3) Straight people flaunt their heterosexuality all the time. We're just so used to it that nobody thinks much of it. You see it movies, TV shows, a straight couple making out in public. People just pay more attention when it's a same-sex couple because they're not used to seeing it, which is understandable. But when you have a problem with it, that's a double standard.
4) How would gay people have to be a third sex? Homosexuality is a fact. There are biologically male people who have sex with other biologically male people. Period. Same for females. Same for animals.
5) I'm glad you agree that gay people shouldn't be persecuted. Hopefully you can also agree that people of all sexual orientations deserve equal legal rights and protection under the law.”
AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

Commented Dec 3, 2012 at 17:59:12 in Gay Voices

“I'm glad that you ask that. The reason I do not just accept that there are people who do not accept LGBT people or same-sex activity is because of all the people who are affected by institutional discrimination. While I'm in pretty good shape--I do not personally experience anti-LGBT prejudice on a regular basis in my interactions with others--there are a lot of people who are affected by homophobia/heterosexism on a daily basis, especially teens whose parents reject them for being gay or lesbian, or who get bullied at school for their sexual orientation. There are many people who want to get married, who have a spouse who needs health insurance but can't get them covered from their employer because they're not allowed to marry, or who are discriminated against in employment and housing because of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

Sexual orientation is not a choice. True, behaviors are, but it is a double standard to treat consenting adults of one sexual orientation differently than consenting adults of another. Anyhow, I hope you can agree with me that the mistreatment that people experience because they happen to be biologically oriented to be attracted to and love people of the same sex is wrong. I'm not asking you and others who hold your views to march in a pride parade, but just to be accepting, or at least tolerant.”

hp blogger Josh A. Goodman on Dec 3, 2012 at 23:17:44

“1) Who defines marriage? (Hint: it's not just any one person.)
2) Take a look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biology_and_sexual_orientation
3) Straight people flaunt their heterosexuality all the time. We're just so used to it that nobody thinks much of it. You see it movies, TV shows, a straight couple making out in public. People just pay more attention when it's a same-sex couple because they're not used to seeing it, which is understandable. But when you have a problem with it, that's a double standard.
4) How would gay people have to be a third sex? Homosexuality is a fact. There are biologically male people who have sex with other biologically male people. Period. Same for females. Same for animals.
5) I'm glad you agree that gay people shouldn't be persecuted. Hopefully you can also agree that people of all sexual orientations deserve equal legal rights and protection under the law.”

forthfaran on Dec 3, 2012 at 20:22:32

“I think you will find that generally speaking people are tolerant;they do object however to the homosexual lobby marching through all the traditions and cultural norms of society.Homosexuals can not be married(to each other) because marriage is an institution ordained specifically for men and women for various reasons.Two same sex people can not be married,it is impossible.Even if a ceremony called marriage was performed,they would still not be married,no more than calling a dog a cat would make it a cat.The state might recognise the contract but it could not be a marriage because homosexuals cannot qualify for marriage in reality.That is not being cruel or nasty it is just an immutable fact.I disagree that homosexuals are biologically different;there is absolutely no evidence that they are.If they were they would be a third sex.I agree with you that homosexuals should not be persecuted in any way,but I and probably many others would just like them to make less of a song and dance about it.”
AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

Commented Nov 30, 2012 at 21:37:37 in Gay Voices

“Anti-gay beliefs works, and I agree that it's more accurate than homophobia unless a person fears homosexuality/gay people. Of course, there are some times when this happens, e.g., the anti-gay politicians who get caught in gay sex scandals probably knew they had some same sex attractions but expressed their fear of such attractions by lashing out against homosexuality. However, anti-gay beliefs is sort of clunky--three words versus one for homophobia--which is why I like the word heterosexism better. But as long as there's an accepted word or phrase and the problem doesn't become invisible, it should be fine.

Also, as a psychology PhD student, I don't think it really matters that the word phobia is being used without a diagnosis. Generalized anxiety disorder is one of the most common psychological diagnoses, but people say they're anxious about everything ranging from tests to dates to interviews without having a psychological disorder. Indeed, they're experiencing anxiety, just not a level that majorly disrupts their life. I don't see a problem with referring to phobias in the same way.”

forthfaran on Dec 3, 2012 at 15:57:29

“It seems that most of the anxiety is on your part;you appear to be very anxious about people who don't agree with homosexual acts.Why not just accept that a lot of people do not accept homosexual acts and respect that.After all ,you are expecting a lot from a red-blooded heterosexual to embrace homosexual acts,or to encounter it without a heterosexual response.”

hhl482 on Dec 1, 2012 at 08:46:49

“People say they are anxious because each person has access to his or her own internal state. That isn't true of anyone else. In other words, I may know that I'm anxious, but how do I know that you are? That said, if it's known that a person fears homosexuality, than I guess it would be appropriate. I don't think one word or term will necessarily be suitable as a replacement for homophobia, by virtue of the fact that it has been used too generally.”
AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

Commented Nov 30, 2012 at 19:10:50 in Gay Voices

“You're right--not agreeing with homosexuality is not in and of itself discrimination. Discrimination is when you act on your belief to treat others unfairly. However, if you do not think homosexuality is okay, then you are exhibiting heterosexism. Well, unless you don't agree with heterosexuality, either.

And puh-lease, it's not the gay lobby that's being oppressive, it's the anti-gay lobby. People who, like you, view being heterosexual as somehow magically better than being lesbian, gay, or bisexual are the ones responsible for the fact that 40 states ban same-sex marriage and 29 states still allow employment and housing discrimination based upon sexual orientation.”
AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

AP's Discouraging 'Homophobia' Is Discouraging

Commented Nov 30, 2012 at 13:57:12 in Gay Voices

“The question I am interested in here is what is AP replacing the word "homophobia" with? In much of the psychological research on LGBTQ issues, the word "homophobia" has been replaced with "heterosexism," which is the belief that heterosexual people are superior to people of other sexual orientations. I think the word heterosexism would be a reasonable replacement for homophobia, and would put the word in line with other discriminatory actions (e.g., racism, sexism, etc). But if AP just eliminates the word homophobia without suggesting another word for anti-gay beliefs and actions, then it makes this prejudice less visible, which is an alarming problem.”

thereisonlyoneparty on Dec 5, 2012 at 09:59:35

“Making up false assumptions of superiority is childish.

And you appear to be completely ignoring when those on the non-heterosexual side do it. They do. Rather often. But I guess we cannot criticize their actions because they have to be victims, right?”

hhl482 on Nov 30, 2012 at 20:27:35

“How about 'anti-gay beliefs'? I think it was a good decision. It's sloppy, imprecise language, unless the story is about a psychological diagnosis. What it's replaced by depends on the context, but as often as not, anti-gay would probably work.”

forthfaran on Nov 30, 2012 at 17:31:25

“Not agreeing with homosexuality is not discrimination.It is a view,based on a variety of things,that is as valid as any other view.It is rather arrogant to demand that people agree with the homosexual lobby or say nothing.That is wrong and totalitarian.You would soon object if it was the other way round.”
I Am Voting for My Son's President

I Am Voting for My Son's President

Commented Oct 27, 2012 at 16:12:26 in Gay Voices

“I can see where you're coming from. I agree that the debt is a huge problem--one that every president claims they will do something about, but few have actually tackled. Personally, I think Obama has a good plan: a combination of spending cuts (including automatic cuts if Congress does not agree on what to cut out) and higher taxes. But I can respect disagreement on that front.

I have a hard time accepting disagreement when it comes to civil rights, though. What if there were someone running for president now who wanted to have a constitutional amendment banning interracial marriage? A lot of people who agreed with that person's other policies would vote for the other candidate because that overt racism is simply unacceptable. While views on LGBT issues haven't quite caught up to that point, I see this as being a similar case.

Of course, the real solution is that the Republican Party starts embracing, or at least tolerating, LGBT rights. I suspect that will happen, because eventually, failure to do so will alienate a lot of voters. Plus, no one should have to vote for someone who treats them like a second-class citizen just so they can vote for someone with the fiscal and economic policies they like.”

SMichaelRKE on Oct 29, 2012 at 09:31:00

“F&F”
I Am Voting for My Son's President

I Am Voting for My Son's President

Commented Oct 27, 2012 at 04:32:00 in Gay Voices

“It is appropriate to be a one-issue voter when that issue is the difference between you, friends, or loved ones having civil rights and not having those rights. A vote for Romney is a vote for LGBTQ people being second class citizens--both because of the rhetoric he uses (e.g., support for a constitutional marriage amendment, even though it has no chance of passing) and the actual policies he'd affect.

Also, if you want to talk about the economy, let's talk about the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which Obama supports and Romney opposes. There is no reason that anyone should be discriminated against in hiring, firing, and promotions because of their sexual orientation or gender identity--to do so (as Romney seems to have no problem with) puts hardworking LGBT Americans out of jobs.

Finally, LGBT rights do not just affect LGBT people; LGBT rights and anti-gay discrimination affect queer people's families, friends, and communities. The fact that Amelia--a heterosexual woman--is so deeply concerned is case and point.”

LogCabinRepublican91 on Oct 27, 2012 at 10:32:41

“Mr. Goodman, I have read your posts in the past and am honored you responded. As a gay republican, I hear this all the time. But what this country is showing are similar signs that Spain and Greece did before their economy tanked. Obama simply spends more than we take in. Our debt has gone up, and we owe a lot of it to China.
I think gay rights can sit this one out in this election, until the economy gets back in track. that way we dont go into debt.

what was Obama's solution? more spending? his last budget proposal got ZERO votes in the senate. Paul Ryans? his got co-sponsored by a Democrat. So clearly Romney/Ryan are the best people for the next four years.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Religion Factor in a Twentysomethings Relationship

Commented Aug 3, 2012 at 18:35:50 in Religion

“I don't really think this was about whether to break up over religion. I think it's about culture. Latkes, Shabbes candles, etc. have some religious undertones, but don't say anything about what you believe (which would be the religion part). And they're a lot different than, say, Yom Kippur services. Of course it's hard to divorce Jewish religion and culture, but I think what scares Jews about intermarriage is not the loss of religion but the loss of culture. Holding onto a non-mainstream culture in the U.S. is hard--someone who is German American, for example, may like brats and beer, but their German heritage might very well end there. Religion is probably why us Jews have been able to continue our culture despite the assimilation happening all around us.”

mjwca on Aug 3, 2012 at 19:09:38

“So the question becomes, how willing are both people to share their culture with the other person and be open to that person's culture in return. And, almost as importantly, how willing are both people's respective families able and willing to be open to that. Too often latent bigotries surface and hide behind the idea that adding to one's cultural identity is the same thing as giving up one's first culture. Assimilation does not mean giving up your own culture but learning to add to it. If you use your religion as a way to shut yourself off from community with and acceptance of those who are different from you, I'm betting you are missing the essential point of that religion.”
huffingtonpost entry

An Open Letter to Chick-fil-A President Dan Cathy

Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 00:23:36 in Religion

“I admire your call for a middle ground but I see your attempt to address the situation as unlikely to work. Here's why:

Scenario 1: Chick-Fil-A expresses anti-gay sentiments-->gets bad press and boycotts-->profits go down-->if profits go down enough, Chick-Fil-A reconsiders statements

Scenario 2: Chick-Fil-A expresses anti-gay sentiments-->gets increased business-->profits go up-->has no incentive to stop expressing anti-gay sentiments, and is even encouraged to be more outspokenly anti-gay

Furthermore, your proposal offers something good (more business) to Chick-Fil-A, but doesn't offer anything great to LGBT people (besides chicken sandwiches, which they can get elsewhere).

I do, however, hope Chick-Fil-A takes you up on your offer to sit down and meet with them. Dialogue--especially between groups with tension or little exposure to each other--tends to be a good thing.”
Bully Scouts of America: How Anti-Gay Scout Policy Harms Youth

Bully Scouts of America: How Anti-Gay Scout Policy Harms Youth

Commented Jul 20, 2012 at 14:55:01 in Gay Voices

“Hi bannorhill,

To clarify a point I made, I agree that the Boy Scouts do not proactively teach scouts to be homophobic, such as by saying "homosexuality is bad," Rather, the organization leads by example. In excluding kids who are gay, the BSA teaches kids that such exclusion is perfectly fine and that people with a different orientation should be avoided. Kids and teens aren't stupid--they pick up on the message (in their troop and/or by seeing the continual controversy in the news) that differences in the gender of people a scout may one day love are not welcome. And, since kids learn from adults, don't be surprised to see them use this attitude--as justified by the Boy Scouts--elsewhere in life, such as in school.”

Dedrick Warmack on Jul 27, 2012 at 04:54:25

“Most Boy Scouts are not sexually active at their age, and if a kid is expressing that he is gay, then this wouldn't be ideal to have him sleeping in tents with other young boys, the same as it wouldn't be okay to have girl scouts sleeping in the tent with boy scouts. I believe in marriage equality for all, including homosexuals, inclusion in the military and every where else in society except for the boy and girl scouts. The homosexual community is as discriminating as any other community, try being a straight man applying for a job with a LGBQT company, see how they accept you. The Boy Scouts won't allow women to become a scout leader and if they start allowing homosexuals, then the line between man and woman becomes blurred so that eventually they would end up with a Transgendered man/woman and would have to eliminate the boy/girl scouts and just combine them as a Universal group, which goes against the whole idea...”