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Spencer Green

Spencer Green

Posted: January 13, 2010 09:12 PM

An Open, Serious Dialogue About Open, Serious Dialogues About Race

What's Your Reaction:

Moderator: Welcome to this open and serious dialogue about open and serious dialogues about race. With us today are Professor Patterson G. Chumley of the Institute of Words and Hurting; Dr. Melinda Banes Hentoshi of the University of Advanced Universal Advancement; and Theodore Nettles, author of the book Semantics a Go-Go. Professor Chumley, what is the most important thing to consider in having an open and serious dialogue about open and serious dialogues about race?

Professor Chumley: The most important thing, of course, is that the dialogue about open and serious dialogues about race must be completely open and serious. Otherwise, the resulting dialogue about open and serious dialogues will be politicized and completely lose its openness and its seriousness.

Moderator: Dr. Hentoshi, is it even possible for an open and serious dialogue about open and serious dialogues about race to be completely open and serious?

Dr. Hentoshi: I openly admit that it is difficult for any dialogue about open and serious dialogues about race to be completely open and serious, given the typical double standards applied to any dialogue about open and serious dialogues.

Moderator: That is a very serious statement.

Dr. Hentoshi: Yes, it is. Whenever one tries to have an open and serious dialogue about open and serious dialogues about race, conservatives are always presumed to be less open and serious about such dialogues whereas liberals are presumed to be much more open and extremely serious.

Professor Chumley: You cannot be serious!

Dr. Hentoshi: See? Exactly my point.

Moderator: Mr. Nettles, given the pitfalls involving the degree to which one side can truly be as open and serious as another side in an open and serious dialogue about open and serious dialogues about race, what can be done to open the doors for a serious reconsideration of such preconceptions?

Theodore Nettles: The dirty little secret is that many people who openly express the desire to engage in an open and serious dialogue about open and serious dialogues about race are, in fact, not serious about that desire and quite open about that lack of seriousness.

Moderator: So then--if those people are open about that lack of seriousness, it's not really a dirty little secret, is it?

Theodore Nettles: No, I guess not. And that seriously concerns me.

Moderator: Dr. Hentoshi--for the sake of argument, could one try to engage in a dialogue about open and serious dialogues about race that is either open or serious but not both?

Dr. Hentoshi: I seriously doubt it.

Professor Chumley: Until we can all openly agree to openly and seriously engage in a dialogue about open and serious dialogues about race, I seriously question whether we can ever reach the point of openly and seriously beginning such a dialogue.

Theodore Nettles: I'm open to that.

Dr. Hentoshi: Please--get serious.

Moderator: Join us in our next discussion when our guests candidly and revealingly discuss an assortment of candid revelations.