THE BLOG

A Simple Solution: My Modest Proposal for Indiana and Beyond

03/31/2015 03:09 pm ET | Updated Feb 02, 2016

Sometimes a simple solution is best. Many Americans are outraged by the Indiana Religious Freedom Restoration Act and for a good reason. But rather than have a discussion about the timing of the Indiana law and the differences between all RFRA legislation in the United States, I have a simple solution; make every business post a public notice which lists all people they will not serve.

After all, every citizen wants to avoid the embarrassment of being refused service. So rather than having to be told to leave, why not simply tell the customer not to enter or call? Let freedom ring.

I know my brothers and family members would not want to patronize an establishment that would not serve my partner and me. My family would appreciate the information being posted on the front door of the retail establishment, and on the business's website, so they can make educated decisions about where to spend their money. Those businesses who do not have limits on who they serve can simply post a public notice that says "Welcome." Let freedom ring.

My simple solution will also prevent litigation by eliminating confrontations between businesses and unwanted customers. If a business refuses to post a notice of the groups that it will not serve, then the business will be subject to substantial fines that would be paid directly to any customer refused service. After all, the fine could have been avoided by posting the notice appropriately. Let freedom ring.

The issuing and management of the public notices could be managed by a Religious Freedom Restoration Act State Board and generate revenue for Indiana and other states with RFRA laws; think $500 a year from every business and retail establishment. With close to 483,000 firms in Indiana, the public notice signage would generate $241,500,000 annually, not small potatoes. Governor Pence, think what you could do with an extra $241,000,000 in the state coffers each year?

Indiana could develop a searchable online database where people could verify if a business was willing to provide service to them. It could be searched by a variety of different characteristics that qualify under the religious exemption; gay, adulterers, divorced people, unwed mothers, or even African Americans. There was a time when many religions believed that dark skin was the mark of Cain, the first murderer in the Bible. I am sure there are still some religious people that would not want to serve that bloodline. Let freedom ring.

After a couple of months, the data could be used to begin to consolidate businesses that don't serve adulterers in certain areas of Indianapolis to provide for convenient shopping and business transactions. Further at sports stadiums, like Lucas Oil, reserved seating could be based upon which vendors serve which types of people. This will minimize confusion and speed service for beer and dogs! Let freedom ring.

I know providing this simple solution to the RFRA issue will cause me to be honored by state governments and LGBT organizations alike. I do this for the good of the country and to ensure that the issue of any potential negative economic impact on Indiana is quickly resolved. Rest assured, I will let Indiana be the first to honor me by allowing me to place the first official public notice issued in the associated business. Let religious freedom ring.