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How To Handle Recession Workout Depression

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Think of the gym: Stinking of sweating, windows closed--hot, cold and I don't know what--it all hits you when you work out in the winter months. It is not a joy to go to the gym; in fact, it feels like torture. The economic situation is not helping, either. Who wants to be motivated and to be active when it's so easy to turn on the TV and veg out?

"I hate the gym," stated one of my clients. No, she doesn't go to the gym to work out but still works out. "Why do I want to waste my time waiting for a machine or a weight? It isn't relaxing and stresses me out even more," she says.

Enough is enough. Look what is happening to us. Do we really need a gym to be active? Didn't we used to be active just in the great outdoors?

Yes, the times have changed, but our need to breathe fresh air, smell the upcoming spring and feel the wind hasn't. All the talk about going to the gym and how much more in-shape someone is gets boring soon. Think: When was the last time you got bored hearing about how nice an exercise session outdoors (even just walking!) was; how fresh the air smelled after a rainfall; or the sight of the first rays hitting the earth during a snowmelt?

I have a task for you this week: Get out there!

Do the following: Instead of your usual cardio training indoors, head outdoors. No, I'm not taking ANY excuses for an answer. I'm not referring to training your body outdoors for the rest of your life; instead, I'm suggesting one single time outdoors in the next four days. Try it, you might like it.

When you go outside, don't just walk, jog or sprint at one continuous speed. Do intervals: Push your workouts to the 95 percent level of effort for five minutes, and then slow down to recover. Why? A recent study speaks for itself:

"Although moderate aerobic activity has proven to be beneficial for cardiovascular health, a Stanford study shows a 17 percent reduced risk for cardiovascular disease for those involved in higher intensity training and 23 percent reduced risk for those involved in resistance training." This was cited in the JAM, Oct. 2002.

My response:

Hasta La Vista--both to your belly and to economic depression!

Stefan

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