NYR iOS app Android app More

Featuring fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost's signature lineup of contributors
Stephen Harrison

GET UPDATES FROM Stephen Harrison
 

A Cappella Stereotypes (PHOTOS)

Posted: 11/11/11 03:19 PM ET

One might argue that the a cappella revolution is already upon us. NBC's "The Sing-Off" is in its third season. In a surprise twist, the a cappella-loving Andy Bernard is now the boss--err, regional manager--on "The Office." The college a cappella scene is thriving, with over 2,000 collegiate groups currently active in the U.S.

And yet, when people asked why I enjoyed a cappella, I struggled for an easy explanation. What's so special about singing sans instruments? That's part of the reason I wrote AcaPolitics: A Novel About College A Cappella [Aftermath Press, 2011]. I wanted to share how students meet, form lasting friendships, make and abate drama and occasionally fall for each other, all within the campus singing subculture.

Like any community, the a cappella world (or "AcaVerse," as it's called) has some loosely defined roles. Not every bass singer is the "chillest bro you know," but the type is recurring enough to merit mentioning.

Warning: While I'll try to keep musical puns to a minimum, a few might be too fun to resist.

Without further ado, I present the eight most common acatypes.

The Heartthrob Tenor
1  of  9
PLAY
FULLSCREEN
ZOOM
SHARE THIS SLIDE 
Anyone who's ever sat through an all-male a cappella performance is familiar with the tenor whose voice alone makes ladies swoon. There's just something about a boy's sweet high notes which pulls the female heartstrings. Remember: Before Justin Timberlake turned to acting, he spent years charming fans with his critically acclaimed falsetto.
RATE IT!   |  
VOTE
CURRENT TOP 5 PICK YOUR OWN TOP 5
USERS WHO VOTED
NEW! CREATE YOUR OWN SLIDESHOW

 
 
 

Follow Stephen Harrison on Twitter: www.twitter.com/acapolitics