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Susan Redline, M.D., MPH
Dr. Redline is the Peter C. Farrell Professor of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She directs Programs in Sleep and Cardiovascular Medicine and Sleep Medicine Epidemiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Redline’s research includes epidemiological studies and clinical trials designed to 1) elucidate the etiologies of sleep disorders, including the role of genetic and early life developmental factors, and 2) understand the cardiovascular and other health outcomes of sleep disorders and the role of sleep interventions in improving health. She leads the Sleep Reading Center for a number of major NIH multicenter studies, including the Sleep Heart Health Study, and has led several large cohort studies, including the Cleveland Children’s Sleep and Health Study. She has published over 250 peer-reviewed articles and has served the sleep research community in a number of capacities, including as a member of the Boards of Directors for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society, the NIH's Sleep Disorders Research Advisory Board, the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Sleep Medicine and Research, and Deputy Editor for the journal Sleep. She received BS and M.D. degrees from Boston University, an MPH degree from Harvard School of Public Health, completed internal medicine and pulmonary and critical care medicine training at Case Western Reserve University, and a research fellowship in Respiratory Epidemiology at Harvard Medical School.

Entries by Susan Redline, M.D., MPH

Sleep Apnea and Poverty: How Socioeconomics Impacts Proper Diagnosis And Treatment

(86) Comments | Posted August 28, 2012 | 9:01 PM

A wide range of serious health problems disproportionately afflict individuals from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. These conditions, which reduce quality of life and shorten lifespan, include heart disease, stroke, diabetes, asthma, and cancer. Other health problems commonly associated with poverty are...

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