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A New Voice in Mental Illness

In Defense of 'Crazy'

Sarah Griffith Lund | Posted 12.03.2014 | Religion
Sarah Griffith Lund

Crazy is not a bad word. Crazy people are not bad. So I'm reclaiming crazy in public discourse as a way to de-stigmatize mental illness. I stand on the shoulders of many others who repurpose words to empower people whose power has been taken away.

Eleanor Longden's TEDTalk: "The Voices In My Head"

Lloyd I. Sederer, MD | Posted 08.26.2013 | Home
Lloyd I. Sederer, MD

She would not be victim to her condition but rather become a survivor of it. The turning point, as she describes it, was catalyzed by three things: her search for meaning, not going it alone, and finding hope.

Listening to the Soul

Mark Rubinstein | Posted 10.25.2013 | Home
Mark Rubinstein

2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgEleanor also makes clear that the past remains alive for each of us. The experiences of childhood and their effects simmer within us at the deepest levels, never to be lost. They can resurface, and retain the capacity to influence us even though we may not recall them.

Mind Wide Open: Listening to Disturbing Voices, Thoughts and Feelings

Dr. Gary Trosclair | Posted 10.25.2013 | Home
Dr. Gary Trosclair

2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgWe all have many parts to our personalities and getting those parts to work in harmony is the essence of emotional health. Leave out certain voices and you're in for strikes, rebellions, hypocrisy, and, eventually, brutal attacks.

Psychiatry and Recovery: Finding Common Ground And Joining Forces

Allen Frances | Posted 08.24.2013 | Home
Allen Frances

The social context of care for schizophrenia is often at least as important as its medical treatment. The obvious question is why has it been so difficult to translate the brilliant basic neuroscience into dramatic clinical breakthroughs?

Realize Your Mind's Intrinsic Power

Marie Pasinski, M.D. | Posted 08.24.2013 | Home
Marie Pasinski, M.D.

Over time, like Eleanor Longden, you can redesign the infrastructure of your brain. That's the beauty and the miracle of her story. Nothing will have a greater impact on the quality of your life than discovering your brain's intrinsic power.

Madness, Revolution, and Making Peace

Ron Unger | Posted 10.23.2013 | Home
Ron Unger

2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgMost current mental health treatment is based on labeling those disruptive parts as being "symptoms" of a disorder or illness, and then attempting to suppress them by any means possible, especially with drugs. Unfortunately, this can backfire in a number of ways.

The Hope Within

Ashley L. Smith | Posted 08.23.2013 | Home
Ashley L. Smith

2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgI knew my friends were laughing at me, at least that was my perception at the time. This belief led to extreme suspiciousness that tortured my peace of mind daily. I struggled to understand how could this seemingly godly gift be so ugly?

"Learning" Our Way to Mental Healing

Patric K. Stanton | Posted 08.23.2013 | Home
Patric K. Stanton

2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgWhen should society (namely us) view this form of internal experience as a disease, instead of a rare, but acceptable, part of life?

The Real Dangers of Self-Stigmatization

Katy Gray | Posted 08.23.2013 | Home
Katy Gray

2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgBeing sectioned and locked in a hospital ward wasn't on my bucket list, but it's something that has happened to me twice. The first time, I was 20 and in the middle of my studies at university. I had been hearing a voice for two years, a voice I believed was the devil.

Why Mental Health Is Losing Its Soul

Jeffrey Rubin, Ph.D. | Posted 10.23.2013 | Home
Jeffrey Rubin, Ph.D.

2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgThe willingness to explore with patience and empathy the actual experience of what people undergo, no matter how horrific, is indispensable in healing the emotional afflictions that haunt human beings.

WATCH: Why I Thank The Voices In My Head

Eleanor Longden | Posted 08.23.2013 | Home
Eleanor Longden

2013-08-22-EleanorLongden_stageshot.jpgOver the years, my voices have changed, multiplied, terrorized, inspired, and encouraged. Today they are an intrinsic, valued part of my identity, but there was also a time when their presence drove me to delirious extremes of misery, desperation, and despair