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African American Aids

CDC Locks Out Black Providers in New AIDS Technical Assistance Announcement

Phill Wilson | Posted 06.03.2014 | Black Voices
Phill Wilson

On March 19, the CDC awarded $115 million over five years to 21 organizations Not one of the new CDC grantees is a Black organization. The effect of this decision is that Black organizations have been locked out of leading technical assistance and capacity building in this country for the next five years.

Co-Testing For HIV: Would You Do It?

The Huffington Post | Jessica Cumberbatch Anderson | Posted 04.29.2013 | Black Voices

With the introduction of new (and more private) HIV home tests last year, men and women may be moving away from what researchers say is a proven strat...

INFOGRAPHIC: HIV in Black America: A Visual Breakdown

Posted 03.20.2013 | Black Voices

The good news: HIV rates among black women are down. The bad news: New infection rates among black men continue to rise. And with African Americans ac...

Running the Anchor Leg

Neil Lowe | Posted 04.23.2013 | Black Voices
Neil Lowe

Our country and our community need to create an environment where people with HIV can freely disclose our HIV status in a fashion that is appropriate for us and without fear of discrimination, stigma or reprisal.

#RealTalk About HIV/AIDS In The Black Community

Posted 02.08.2013 | Black Voices

It's only been two months since the first ever at-home HIV testing kit hit pharmacy shelves. And while it was designed with the stigma around HIV and ...

Getting to Zero AIDS Cases in America -- Can We Do It?

Dr. Lisa Fitzpatrick | Posted 11.28.2012 | Black Voices
Dr. Lisa Fitzpatrick

Saturday, December 1st is World AIDS Day. The theme this year highlights our public health goal of "Getting to Zero" -- that is, zero new cases of HIV. We couldn't be further from this goal, especially in the black community.

Time to Start Talking

Vanessa Cullins | Posted 11.15.2011 | Black Voices
Vanessa Cullins

While STIs cross all racial lines, African Americans are disproportionately at risk for such common infections as chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, and syphilis. African-American women must take the first step to protect our health: Talk about sex.