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Alaska Wilderness League

Lucia Graves

Anti-Arctic Drilling Activists Swarm The White House

HuffingtonPost.com | Lucia Graves | Posted 05.15.2012 | Green

WASHINGTON -- Because sometimes to get your point across you need to dress up as an Arctic Tern, scores of anti-drilling activists on Tuesday gathered...

Polar. Bear. Dance. Party.

AP | Posted 04.28.2012 | Miami

MIAMI -- A polar bear dance party in Miami is aimed at raising awareness about the need to protect the Arctic Ocean. The dancers are expected to dres...

Murkowski Offers Obamas Milkshakes In Exchange For Frank Discussion

Fuel Fix | Posted 03.30.2012 | Politics

Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski has invited President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama for a milkshake to discuss producing oil in the Arctic National W...

How "Drill, Baby, Drill" and "Yes We Can" Got Married

Subhankar Banerjee | Posted 05.02.2012 | Green
Subhankar Banerjee

Once upon Sarah Palin uttered the now (in)famous phrase "Drill, Baby, Drill." Also, once upon a time Barack Obama uttered the now (in)famous phrase "Yes We Can." These two phrases got married along the way, and will now produce their baby "Kill, Baby, Kill."

Don't Allow Shell Oil to Destroy America's Arctic

Cindy Shogan | Posted 09.27.2011 | Green
Cindy Shogan

The Inupiat people of Alaska's North Slope stand to lose everything if Shell is allowed to drill in Arctic waters. For thousands of years, they have survived off the bounty of "their garden," which is home to polar bears, bowhead whales, ice seals, walrus and so much more.

Why We Can't Have Another One Hundred Years of Fossil-Digging in North America

Subhankar Banerjee | Posted 05.25.2011 | Green
Subhankar Banerjee

We've burned coal-and-oil for more than hundred years that has resulted in the human-made climate change we're dealing with right now. We cannot allow one more hundred years of the same.

Whalers Fear Effects Of Off-Shore Drilling

Eric Kroh | Posted 05.25.2011 | Home
Eric Kroh

McCain and Obama debate offshore drilling but Alaskan whalers whose families have hunted in Arctic waters for centuries witness the environmental impact firsthand, from inevitable spills to routine sonic bombs.