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American Politics

America's Late Imperial Paradox

Ian Buruma | Posted 06.09.2014 | World
Ian Buruma

The much-vaunted "liberal order" policed by the U.S. was a product of World War II and the Cold War. Germany and Japan had to be kept down, the Communist powers had to be contained, and the old countries of Europe had to learn to live with one another under unifying pan-national institutions. All of this was made possible by American money and military might. As a result, the Free World, in Western Europe and East Asia, became a US dependency. This cannot go on forever. Indeed, the arrangements are already fraying. But then comes the old imperial paradox. The longer others remain dependent on the U.S., the less capable they will be of taking care of their own affairs, including their security. And, like an authoritarian parent, the U.S. itself, despite its admonitions to its allies to pull their weight, is often loath to let go of its increasingly unruly dependents.

Elizabeth Warren and America's New Progressive Moment

Michael Cecil | Posted 05.27.2014 | Politics
Michael Cecil

Put simply, Warren represents the strongest counterweight to the influence of moneyed interests over our political process.

The New SDS: What Every Young Person Needs to Know About Its Past

Steve Mariotti | Posted 05.27.2014 | Politics
Steve Mariotti

In 1965, Carl Oglesby assumed leadership of the student-activist organization SDS. This change reflected what I believe was an ideological shift in America's left wing: from the East Coast intellectual tradition to the New Left emerging from the Midwest.

The Rise and Fall of the Nation's Largest Student Movement: the Students for Democratic Society

Steve Mariotti | Posted 07.19.2014 | Politics
Steve Mariotti

Today, the student-activist organization Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) is being reactivated on college campuses around the country as the New SDS. Yet, how many of its new members are aware of SDS's complex past and the role of its legendary leader, Carl Oglesby?

China Needs To Lighten Up. America Needs To Tighten Up.

Nathan Gardels | Posted 06.29.2014 | World
Nathan Gardels

As governing systems, both China's autocracy and America's democracy are facing crisis. In many ways, their crises are the mirror image of each other -- and so are the solutions. To fix itself, China needs more re-politicization -- robust popular feedback and accountability to aerate its hidebound mandarinate. American democracy needs more de-politicization --stronger meritocratic, non-partisan and deliberative practices and institutions -- to escape its capture by the populist, short-term horizon of voters, organized special interests and the paralyzing gridlock of its adversarial political parties. Our two political cultures are as distinct as our economies are intertwined. Yet both have much to learn from each other's strengths as well as weaknesses. In short, China needs to lighten up; America needs to tighten up.

Will 2014 End up like 1914?

Larry Summers | Posted 06.22.2014 | World
Larry Summers

Economic success does not assure peace, but economic failure and disintegration almost assures conflict. It is incumbent on the leaders of the major nations of the world to figure out how to achieve more rapid and sustained economic growth. A commitment to maintain strength, to uphold the international order, is an inherent and deeply-seated part of any successful global system. Great powers can never bluff. When they bluff, when their intentions are uncertain, they are tested. When they are tested, questions arise, and the prospect of conflict mounts.

Post-Party Democracy Can Restore the Rule of the Many Over Money

Nathan Gardels | Posted 06.08.2014 | World
Nathan Gardels

Now legally for sale to the highest bidder, multi-party representative democracy may well be compromised beyond repair. When elected officials increasingly represent their contributors instead of constituents, voting becomes a form of disenfranchisement disguised as consent of the governed. The more things get out of hand, the less radical the alternatives appear. To restore the rule of the many over money, we need to go way beyond the same old campaign financing debate and start thinking about reforming our system of democratic governance itself. It's time to open up the political imagination and think outside the conventional ballot box.

Why Jimmy LaSalvia Has Become a Welcome Independent Voice in the U.S.

Scott De Buitléir | Posted 03.19.2014 | Gay Voices
Scott De Buitléir

On Monday last, Jimmy LaSalvia, who co-founded the U.S. Republican LGBT group, GOProud, announced on his website that he has left the Republican Party, and has become independent.

America Growing Even More Deeply Divided

www.washingtonpost.com | Posted 12.29.2013 | Politics

Political polarization has ushered in a new era in state government, where single-party control of the levers of power has produced competing Americas...

Why Football and Baseball Bring Balance to America

Aristotle Tziampiris | Posted 02.22.2014 | Sports
Aristotle Tziampiris

Baseball is the mythic ideal. Football is the brutal reality. Both represent the two symbolic sides of the coin that is America.

Celebrity Clerk: Gov. Bobby Jindal -- A Cartoon

Mike Spicer | Posted 12.17.2013 | Politics
Mike Spicer

mikespicercartoonist.blogspot.ca/...

The Roots of Our Political Dysfunction

James Zogby | Posted 01.23.2014 | Politics
James Zogby

The question, as it has been framed, is: how could a minority of hard-line extremists generate enough fear that they were able paralyze their party's leadership forcing the government to shut down and bringing the nation to the brink of default?

The Wrong Battle: Why Today's Politicians Are Fighting the Wrong Battles & Setting Us All Back

Eric Quon-Lee | Posted 12.18.2013 | Politics
Eric Quon-Lee

One of the many reasons that people are being 'turned off' by political discourse is due to the fact that it is failing to address the underlying root causes of individual dissatisfaction. Frameworks have yet to adapt to these new realities.

Hey Congress, Here's What Real Leadership Looks Like

The Huffington Post | Shadee Ashtari | Posted 10.15.2013 | Politics

The U.S. government shutdown has entered its third week of blame, frustration and stalemate. Among other consequences, shutdown collateral has resulte...

What if America Ends With a Whimper?

Ethan Casey | Posted 12.14.2013 | Politics
Ethan Casey

As an American who's at least as provincial as I am liberal, I've found myself mischievously wondering of late: if the federal government shuts down and stays that way, so what?

Is American Politics Broken?

Craig Snyder | Posted 01.23.2014 | Politics
Craig Snyder

The first Federal government shut down in 17 years. The prospect of the first ever default on our nation's debt. Why can't our political parties compr...

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy at Three: Time for Recommitment to Ending AIDS in America

Rep. Barbara Lee | Posted 10.22.2013 | Politics
Rep. Barbara Lee

We now have the effective tools and improved policies necessary to begin to end the AIDS epidemic in America, but our biggest challenges lie ahead.

Why the Anger?

Robert Reich | Posted 10.12.2013 | Politics
Robert Reich

Why is there more anger, vituperation, and political polarization now than even during Joe McCarthy's anti-communist witch hunts of the 1950s, the tempestuous struggle for civil rights in the 1960s, the divisive Vietnam war, or the Watergate scandal?

Stop the Haters: Shmuley Boteach and Cory Booker Bring Hope to American Politics

Rabbi Evan Moffic | Posted 08.31.2013 | Religion
Rabbi Evan Moffic

A spate of recent articles has wondered whether Cory Booker is "too Jewish" and too conservative in his views on the U.S.-Israel relationship. They analyze and speculate on his friendships with two Orthodox rabbis. In doing so, they reflect all that is wrong with American politics and Jewish life.

You Have No Privacy. So What?

Ethan Casey | Posted 08.07.2013 | Politics
Ethan Casey

We can, and should, be angry to learn that all of our communications and movements have been secretly monitored for years. But we can't escape our own responsibility by claiming to be surprised.

Back to the Future?

Mark D. Weinberg | Posted 08.04.2013 | Politics
Mark D. Weinberg

Neither Reagan nor Clinton (Bill, at least) will occupy the Oval Office again. But it might be worth thinking about what made them successful when we choose their future successors.

The George W. Bush (Ka-pow!) Presidential Museum Experience

Saladin Ambar | Posted 07.31.2013 | Politics
Saladin Ambar

The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum may be the single most ironic, self-deceiving, quasi-religio-patriotic experience you'll ever witness in your life.

Orthodoxy and Change

Gary Hart | Posted 05.16.2013 | Politics
Gary Hart

Underlying all the media focus on the cardinals' selection of a new pope, and the predictable focus on personality over meaning, was a much greater struggle between tradition and reform, conservatism and progress. That struggle mirrors politics in America and most western democracies.

Drones: What Are We Doing to Ourselves?

Ethan Casey | Posted 04.27.2013 | Politics
Ethan Casey

I don't have much to say about drones that isn't being said, except that -- as my late grandmother, may she rest in peace, would have put it -- they're just plain wrong.

Oh, Where Have You Gone, Mr. Roosevelt? Our Nation Turns Its Angry Eyes to You

Jon Knokey | Posted 04.06.2013 | Politics
Jon Knokey

The partisan political environment in America provides opportunity for the next generation of American leaders. Don't believe it? Just ask Theodore Roosevelt.