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Assad ISIS

A No-Fly Zone Would Hurt Both Assad and ISIS

Veton Surroi | Posted 09.15.2014 | World
Veton Surroi

The Free Syrian Army, caught between the al-Assad air forces and the Islamic State group's territorial expansion, will benefit directly from an air campaign that is simultaneously against ISIS but does not allow any other air military activity.

Can a Coalition of Rivals Fight ISIS?

Shashank Joshi | Posted 09.08.2014 | World
Shashank Joshi

The nations opposed to ISIS are strange bedfellows -- the United States, its Arab allies, and NATO member Turkey as well as Iran and its ally Syria. Together, a coalition of these rivals would include almost all of the region's combat power, both Sunni and Shia nations. ISIS would be surrounded on every side. Yet such a coalition is unlikely to emerge.

Sabrina Siddiqui

Would The U.S. Have To Partner With Assad To Eliminate ISIS In Syria?

HuffingtonPost.com | Sabrina Siddiqui | Posted 09.04.2014 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- As President Barack Obama weighs airstrikes in Syria against the Islamic State (ISIS), he may soon have to grapple with the possibility...

America Cannot Defeat ISIS by Aligning with Dictators Because the Two Exist in Symbiosis

Rula Jebreal | Posted 08.28.2014 | World
Rula Jebreal

Extremists benefit from the climate of oppression created dictators

Sam Stein

Counterterrorism Experts: U.S. Partnership With Assad May Be Necessary To Take Out ISIS

HuffingtonPost.com | Sam Stein | Posted 08.28.2014 | Politics

WASHINGTON -- Two former top military and counterterrorism officials said on Sunday that the United States should be prepared to start working with th...

Syrian Airstrikes Target Islamic State Militants

AP | RYAN LUCAS | Posted 08.17.2014 | World

BEIRUT (AP) — Syrian government warplanes pounded an Islamic State group stronghold as well as other towns controlled by the extremists, conducting ...

Why Triumphant Jihadis In Iraq Will Help Assad Crush Opposition In Aleppo

Noah Bonsey | Posted 09.20.2014 | World
Noah Bonsey

The world's most feared jihadi group, the Islamic State (ISIS), is parlaying its dramatic gains in Iraq into Syria. Already flush with cash and weapons, ISIS stands to receive another, invaluable windfall in Aleppo, Syria's largest city prior to the war. Regime forces there are on the verge of encircling opposition militants. Their success in doing so would benefit ISIS as much as it would Bashar al-Assad, throttling the more moderate rebel enemy both share.