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Charles Dickens

A Farewell to Arms (1929): Giving Thanks...

Joseph Cooper | Posted 11.24.2014 | Books
Joseph Cooper

One wonders how Frederic Henry would handle the job of evacuating wounded from Syria, Iraq, or Afghanistan, 85 years after he was deployed to the World War One Italian front as an ambulance driver, by Ernest Hemingway, in A Farewell to Arms.

The Books We're Thankful For

The New York Public Library | Posted 11.25.2014 | Books
The New York Public Library

When it comes to Thanksgiving, librarians enjoy pumpkin pie and the Thanksgiving Day Parade as much as the next person. But it should come as no surprise that for the librarians at The New York Public Library, one of the things they're most thankful for are books.

Flesh and Blood: A Fascinating Talk With Patricia Cornwell

Mark Rubinstein | Posted 11.12.2014 | Books
Mark Rubinstein

Patricia Cornwell is the internationally bestselling and award-winning author of 33 books, the most famous and widely read being the 22 novels of the "Kay Scarpetta" series.

On The Future of Wagnerism, Part 4: Comparing the Jewish Protests of Klinghoffer with the Gay Protests of Cruising and by ACT UP

Lawrence D. Mass, M.D. | Posted 11.12.2014 | Arts
Lawrence D. Mass, M.D.

In the case of Klinghoffer, as in the case of Cruising, the bottom lines for me are simple. I am concerned about some of the rhetoric and tactics of some gay radicals, but I am a lot more concerned about homophobia.

How A Near-Death Experience Inspired Bill Maher's Executive Producer To Write His Latest Play

The Huffington Post | Alena Hall | Posted 10.21.2014 | Religion

One can only avoid life's big questions for so long. And when writer Scott Carter finally faced those questions, the result was the creation of his...

Jaweed Kaleem

What Jefferson, Dickens And Tolstoy Can Teach Us About Exploring The Big Questions

HuffingtonPost.com | Jaweed Kaleem | Posted 10.31.2014 | Religion

In 1804, over three consecutive evenings, President Thomas Jefferson completed a private spiritual project. Using the King James Bible, he took a penk...

New Play 'Discord' Is Like Your Philosophy 101 Class, But Funnier

The Huffington Post | Taryn Hillin | Posted 10.28.2014 | Arts

At some point in our lives, we've all asked ourselves the same two questions: "Why are we here?" and "Does God exist?" Scott Carter's new play "Dis...

It's Raining Goals

Ashley Jude Collie | Posted 08.17.2014 | Sports
Ashley Jude Collie

We can't help but feel we're watching the last vestiges of the two big European colonization waves from the early 15th to early 20th centuries.

Suspicion: A Talk with Joseph Finder

Mark Rubinstein | Posted 07.28.2014 | Books
Mark Rubinstein

Joseph Finder has a background every thriller novelist would love to have. He spent his early childhood living around the world.

"Scrooge, Don Draper, and Patrick Bateman Walk Into a Bar... "

Joseph A. Domino | Posted 07.09.2014 | Entertainment
Joseph A. Domino

Early Scrooge and Draper appear "normal" enough, if unsavory, to be representative of mainstream society, yet we are aware of a low-grade pathology at work. Bateman would drive off the cliff, laughing maniacally.

The Most Literate Generation: Wattpad & the Power of Social Reading

Ondi Timoner | Posted 06.02.2014 | Technology
Ondi Timoner

The next time you hear someone say "no one reads anymore," show them Wattpad. With more than 20 million users, Wattpad is the world's largest community for readers and writers, and to the consternation of traditional publishing -- entirely free.

Missing My Irish Grandmother

Abra Deering Norton | Posted 05.17.2014 | Women
Abra Deering Norton

My grandmother was born around 1912. She came of age before and during the Great Depression and despite being from a modest background, she (and most of my family tree) were all educated women who spoke multiple languages and played the piano.

My Incredible Experience With Ancestry.com

John Blumenthal | Posted 05.09.2014 | Fifty
John Blumenthal

Now that I'm over 50, I've become particularly curious about my lineage. I didn't much care about it when I was in my 20s, 30s or 40s but I now feel a strong urge to learn about my roots. Am I distantly related to Lincoln or Gandhi or Dickens or Attila the Hun? Okay, Attila the Hun might be a stretch.

Serial Novels: Modern Torture or the Best Way to Read Fiction?

Maya Rodale | Posted 05.07.2014 | Books
Maya Rodale

Everything old is new again. What began as a nineteenth century publishing practice is now seeing a resurgence thanks to digital technology.

Hoping For A Second Chance In Life

George Heymont | Posted 04.28.2014 | Arts
George Heymont

Who among us hasn't thought of a pivotal moment in life for which he wished he had been granted a do-over? Who hasn't looked back in anger (or regret) and wished for a second chance that might have led to better results?

13 Words You Probably Didn't Know Were Coined By Authors

Paul Anthony Jones | Posted 04.22.2014 | Books
Paul Anthony Jones

Shakespeare isn't the be-all and end-all of course (that's another of his by the way). English has had its fair share of literary giants over the years who, from Chaucer and Milton to Dickens and even Dr. Seuss, have each contributed words to our language.

To See By Common Light

David Katz, M.D. | Posted 04.20.2014 | Healthy Living
David Katz, M.D.

As a scientist, always striving to see outside the tunnel, to apply the proper blend of skepticism and open-mindedness, that I write today to recommend a work of fiction as a source of surprising light.

Talking Union

Lionel Rolfe | Posted 04.12.2014 | Media
Lionel Rolfe

Now Bernstein is gone, and the Times apparently has no one left who can or would be allowed to write intelligently about labor. Despite what you might think, Hollywood is not the only economic driver of Los Angeles.

Charles Dickens's Mysterious Childhood

Ruth Richardson | Posted 04.09.2014 | Books
Ruth Richardson

The hype about Charles Dickens's secret late-life love affair and the new movie The Invisible Woman is everywhere. But parts of Dickens's own childhood seems to have been curiously invisible too - so well-hidden that they are only now coming to light.

Rediscovering the Power of Story: One Actor, Making Magic

Monica Bauer | Posted 03.29.2014 | Arts
Monica Bauer

There's a time and a place to see The Lion King, and a time and a place to sit in a small theater, inches away from a great actor, who brings you face to face with nature, red in tooth and claw.

The Goldfinch and the Art of Reading

Dora Levy Mossanen | Posted 03.24.2014 | Books
Dora Levy Mossanen

Ah! The joys and tribulations of being surrounded by stacks of books at my bedside, my husband's bedside, books tucked into every available nook and cranny, piled high on every tabletop and stacked double on every shelf, making it impossible to navigate around safely.

Some Like It Raw

George Heymont | Posted 03.01.2014 | Arts
George Heymont

It's easy to reach a point where one no longer wishes to attend performances of The Nutcracker, A Christmas Carol, Handel's Messiah, or Hansel and Gretel because repetition has dulled the thrill.

Ralph Fiennes' Invisible Woman: Felicity Jones

Regina Weinreich | Posted 02.23.2014 | Entertainment
Regina Weinreich

Invisibility is perhaps desirable if you are going to be the mistress of one of the most popular writers of all time. The story of Charles Dickens' mi...

Matthew Jacobs

The Strangest Christmas Gift Ever Given To Felicity Jones

HuffingtonPost.com | Matthew Jacobs | Posted 12.23.2013 | Entertainment

Felicity Jones has starred alongside some of Hollywood's most buzzed about young actors, including Andrew Garfield in "The Amazing Spider-Man 2" and E...

The Ghost of Christmas Present: Who Will Care for Our Children This Christmas?

Clark Power | Posted 02.21.2014 | Politics
Clark Power

In Scrooge's comfortable moral world, parents are responsible for their "own" children. The Ghost of Christmas Present reveals that these wretched children belong to him and to us all. "They are Man's." These are our children, and we are all responsible for their future, which is ours.