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Choosing Wisely

Getting Patients Out of the Dark

Robert Whitcomb | Posted 07.18.2014 | Healthy Living
Robert Whitcomb

I attended the 2014 Summer Institute for Informed Patient Choice: The Legal and Ethical Implications of Keeping Patients in the Dark, held in Hanover,...

Letter to Mount Sinai's Heart Surgery Factory: Learn a Lesson From Downton Abbey

Rosemary Gibson | Posted 05.12.2014 | Business
Rosemary Gibson

Too-big-to-fail hospitals blow up the money of the working men and women of America, the people who work "downstairs" -- the tireless Mrs. Patmores and Mrs. Hughes' of the world.

Commercialized Genomics: Caveat Emptor

Steve Heilig | Posted 01.23.2014 | Science
Steve Heilig

But again, personal genetic tests are now available and being pushed at us aggressively -- sometimes with fishy-looking endorsements attached.

Too Much Medicine Is Bad for Our Health

Allen Frances | Posted 11.13.2013 | Science
Allen Frances

The evidence is compelling that we in the developed countries (especially the US) are overtesting for disease, overdiagnosing it, and overtreating.

Choosing (Medicine) Wisely: Good Answers for Good Questions

David Katz, M.D. | Posted 06.09.2012 | Healthy Living
David Katz, M.D.

Make your standard of care better than standard. Be a good boss -- ask good questions, get good answers. By doing so, you can help ensure that you and your doctor are always diligent, and choosing wisely -- together.

"Choosing Wisely": Physicians Step to the Front in Health Care Reform

Donald M. Berwick, MD | Posted 06.08.2012 | Politics
Donald M. Berwick, MD

Blunt, unfeeling cuts in health care benefits, coverage, or payments are one way to bring health care costs under control, but they are not the right way. Far better is to identify the many ways in which health care wastes money doing things that do not help patients and, too often, hurt them.

Big Business Gets Fat On Renewable Appetites

John Selby | Posted 11.17.2011 | Healthy Living
John Selby

Human beings often confuse appetites, and substitute one craving for another. Rather than responding to the desire to move more, we often substitute eating more, or napping.