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Cognitive Science

F.R.E.U.D.: Fetal Reconstructive Emotional Unalienable Deity (Or, Can a Machine Ever Love Us?)

Oren Frank | Posted 04.27.2013 | Healthy Living
Oren Frank

A good therapist will care for us, accept and even love us, in her or his own way, and thus allow us to accept and love ourselves a little more. I don't know if we can ever achieve such a relationship without a human connection.

Retooling Brain-Care With Low-Cost Technology

Alvaro Fernandez | Posted 03.27.2013 | TED Weekends
Alvaro Fernandez

If we are to meet a massive and growing need, we'll need to disrupt today's status quo in which research is based on small and fragmented clinical trials, and where active brain care is often left for patients whose problems have grown until it is too difficult to manage them.

What Are Violent Video Games Doing To Us? It's Complicated

Posted 01.18.2013 | Science

For all their popularity, video games -- violent ones in particular -- get a pretty bad rap. They've come under fire for making our kids lazy, insubor...

Critical Thinking: How Long Does it Take?

Jonathan Haber | Posted 01.29.2013 | Education
Jonathan Haber

Far from being some form of esoteric knowledge, critical thinking turns out to be one of the more easy-to-learn and pragmatic skills available to all. Or at least all those willing to put in the reasonable amount of work needed to achieve success.

The Empathy Formula

Sam Chaltain | Posted 01.13.2013 | Education
Sam Chaltain

Instead of offering disconnected but well-intentioned efforts to help children think, feel or act, would adults start to help children think, feel and act? Would communities be increasingly populated with people who were neither narcissistic nor emotionally empty?

Why Chocolate Makes You Smarter: It's Proven!

Randi Hutter Epstein, MD, MPH | Posted 12.29.2012 | Science
Randi Hutter Epstein, MD, MPH

People believe studies that confirm their suspicions. So here's a study that I think has to be true, even if the author wrote it a bit facetiously: According to a study in The New England Journal of Medicine, if you eat a lot of chocolate, you up your chances of getting a Nobel Prize.

50 Shades of Grey Matter: Your Mind on Smut

Benjamin K. Bergen | Posted 12.24.2012 | Science
Benjamin K. Bergen

Just like any narrative language, erotic fiction is transporting. It just happens to transport you into experiencing sights and sounds that are emotionally charged and sexually arousing.

Jane Austen Weekly: Elizabeth Bennet's Brain Scan

Susan Celia Greenfield | Posted 12.11.2012 | Books
Susan Celia Greenfield

In Pride and Prejudice, the reward for meticulous critical scrutiny is self-consciousness, intellectual expansion and moral growth. Long before the invention of fMRIs, Jane Austen knew that close reading was good for the brain... and for the soul.

Cognitive Bias and the Blame for Benghazi

Austin Dacey | Posted 12.03.2012 | Media
Austin Dacey

How much blame is deserved by the morally unlucky producers of incendiary material that sparks violence given that the Internet and the rest of the world is littered with loads of comparable material that, as it happens, does not?

Culture of Greedy Mind Readers

Lisa Zunshine | Posted 12.03.2012 | Science
Lisa Zunshine

Most of the time we are not even aware that we are attributing thoughts and feelings to people. Sure, afterwards I construct elaborate clauses about what I thought about what you thought about what I thought. But when it's happening, it's fast, messy, and mostly nonverbal.

How Magicians Know Which Card You're Thinking About

| Posted 08.01.2012 | Science

By Jay Olson Think of a playing card. Got one in mind? Although it may have felt like a free choice, think again: Most people choose one of only f...

Analytical Thinking Promotes Disbelief In Experimental Psychology

Samuel Brown | Posted 08.28.2012 | Religion
Samuel Brown

There is nothing terribly religious about a questionnaire on belief in angels during a college psychology experiment. These studies fail the basic scientific test of measuring what they purport to measure.

The Importance of Reading for All of Us

Anna Leahy | Posted 08.24.2012 | Books
Anna Leahy

Many other animals make tools. Dolphins recognize themselves in mirrors. Elephants mourn their dead. But what other creatures share stories -- and share them with people they don't even know?

5 Myths That Stop Us From Achieving Our Goals

Anna Leahy | Posted 08.18.2012 | Healthy Living
Anna Leahy

We tend to think mistakes get in the way of progress or, worse, mean failure. With small tasks, that's likely. But when it comes to thinking big and achieving something over time, error is an important part of the process.

From Anti-Alzheimer's 'Magic Bullets' to True Brain Health

Alvaro Fernandez | Posted 06.15.2012 | Healthy Living
Alvaro Fernandez

If you followed news coverage on the release of the National Alzheimer's Plan, you'd probably conclude that the solution to maintain lifelong brain health is simple: Simply wait until 2025 for a "magic bullet" to be discovered to cure Alzheimer's disease.

Elvis Ballad Yields Clues About Puzzling Disorder

Posted 06.15.2012 | Science

By: MyHealthNewsDaily Staff Published: 06/14/2012 02:11 PM EDT on MyHealthNewsDaily p> Even the toughest of hearts might melt at the sound of Elv...

Simple 'Mirror' Trick Eases Arthritis Pain, Study Shows

| Stephani Sutherland | Posted 05.23.2012 | Science

Amputees who experience phantom limb pain can sometimes get relief from an optical illusion. This trick involves looking in a mirror at the reflection...

What Sleight Of Hand Reveals About Brain Function

| Mariette DiChristina | Posted 05.17.2012 | Science

“I see you have a watch with a buckle.” Standing at my side, Apollo Robbins held my wrist lightly as he turned my hand over and back. I knew exac...

Why Some People Are Better At Drawing Than Others

Posted 06.25.2012 | Science

Since the dawn of human art-making, the divide has been clear: There are people who can effortlessly sketch an object's likeness, and people who...

Neuroethics: Whose Mind Is It Anyway?

Matthew D. Erlich, M.D. | Posted 06.23.2012 | Science
Matthew D. Erlich, M.D.

Reading a person's thoughts, implanting machinery into man, and augmenting our neural processing powers with cognitive enhancers are all matters of neuroethics. They bring us face to face with questions about who has access to powerful new technologies and for what purposes.

WATCH: Creepy Robot Has Human-Like 'Bones, Joints, Tendons'

Posted 04.18.2012 | Science

We may not be able to build a human-like replicant just yet, but robotics engineers have managed to create a machine man that's far more realistic tha...

The Psychology of Whew!

Wray Herbert | Posted 06.10.2012 | Science
Wray Herbert

Despite its familiarity, we don't really know much about its nature or purpose. How does relief function in the human mind? What benefit could this pervasive emotion have in navigating life?

Are We Putting the (Knowledge) Cart Before the (Emotional) Horse?

Sam Chaltain | Posted 05.30.2012 | Education
Sam Chaltain

In school reform, we dramatically overvalue the importance of academic learning, and assume that merely focusing on better curricula and clearer standards will carry the day. Yet the research suggests otherwise.

Neurotechnology: Science Fiction or Applied Science?

Matthew D. Erlich, M.D. | Posted 05.21.2012 | Science
Matthew D. Erlich, M.D.

As science makes a reality of what has been science fiction, we will face questions of how to best apply neurotechnologies. Should they be limited to helping those who have illnesses? Or should they bolster the performance of a wartime soldier, enable a C student to get As, or supercharge CEOs?

Amy Lee

Fear Can Help You Appreciate Abstract Art: Study

HuffingtonPost.com | Amy Lee | Posted 02.18.2012 | Home

The next time you're having trouble appreciating Jackson Pollock, try seeing a horror movie first. According to a new study, feeling fear may actua...