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Creative Iq

Who Is the Real You?

Rabbi Daniel Cohen | Posted 12.11.2012 | TED Weekends
Rabbi Daniel Cohen

Watch the TEDTalk that inspired this post. Who is the real you? Do people admire you for what you possess or for who you are? A number of years ago,...

Aiming For Failure

Ben Michaelis, Ph.D. | Posted 02.08.2013 | TED Weekends
Ben Michaelis, Ph.D.

Most people tend to run from failure as though it were some kind of disease -- a life sentence. Yet, it is anything but that. In order to change the system, to help the "square peg" kids, our national conversation needs to be turned towards failure.

Start Off As A Builder Of Fires

Kate Gale | Posted 02.06.2013 | TED Weekends
Kate Gale

When my son was in the fourth grade, his class did a short version of Romeo and Juliet. I don't know why that play was decided on for the fourth grade, but I believe his teacher was a romantic and liked the idea of little kids acting out this play of love and glory.

Racing Up The Down-Moving Escalator

Gregory Kristof | Posted 02.07.2013 | TED Weekends
Gregory Kristof

Sir Ken Robinson notes the universal but rarely acknowledged hierarchy of the subjects, in which math is esteemed most, followed by the sciences and then the humanities, and the theatrical arts the least. Hierarchies, however, crush creativity.

The Power of the Arts

John M. Eger | Posted 02.07.2013 | TED Weekends
John M. Eger

More neuroscientists, psychologists, educators and others are finding that the arts help nurture the right hemisphere of the brain, and is exactly what the more left brained curriculum needs to create the new thinking skills leading to creativity.

Schools That Foster Creativity

Dr. R. Keith Sawyer | Posted 02.07.2013 | TED Weekends
Dr. R. Keith Sawyer

Many of us imagine that creativity involves a sudden flash of insight; that it comes as a gift, without much effort; and we believe that expertise and learning blocks creativity. But these beliefs are just myths.

The Learning Revolution, Circa 2012

Sam Chaltain | Posted 02.06.2013 | TED Weekends
Sam Chaltain

Sir Ken's talk is a reminder that people everywhere recognize that there is no issue more important to our future than the education of our newest generations. And his message, fittingly, is that we are the people we've been waiting for all along.

Tearing Down Classroom Walls

Greg Anrig | Posted 02.06.2013 | TED Weekends
Greg Anrig

Research demonstrates that the aspirations for schools that Sir Ken Robinson sets forward in his TEDTalk are by no means unattainable. Unfortunately, the vast majority of schools -- private as well as public -- still adhere to the traditional industrial model that relies on self-contained classrooms.

Society Is Killing Schools' Ability To Encourage Creativity

Brian Rosenberg | Posted 02.06.2013 | TED Weekends
Brian Rosenberg

It's easy and tempting to blame teachers or unions or professors for the problems in education, but the reality is that here -- as in the political institutions about which we so passionately complain -- we get what we deserve, or rather, we get the natural result of the choices we make.

Art Making In The Age Of Mouse Clicking

John Seed | Posted 08.23.2013 | TED Weekends
John Seed

There is a reason that every graphic software has "brush" tools: it is because technology is trying very, very hard to emulate the subtlety of expression that only a physical brush applied a human hand to actual materials can truly offer.

Do Schools Kill Creativity?

Sir Ken Robinson | Posted 02.06.2013 | TED Weekends
Sir Ken Robinson

2012-12-06-kenrobinsonpullWe're all born with deep natural capacities for creativity, and systems of mass education tend to suppress them. It is increasingly urgent to cultivate these capacities and to rethink the dominant approaches to education to make sure that we do.

Teach To Each Child's Intelligence

Thomas Fisher | Posted 02.05.2013 | TED Weekends
Thomas Fisher

Why do we make so many students wait until the last couple of years of college to finally find pleasure in learning? Why can't primary and secondary schools follow the model of colleges and teach to the intelligence of their students?