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Estelle Parsons

Meryl Streep Hosts the NY Premiere of My Old Lady at MoMA

Regina Weinreich | Posted 09.13.2014 | Entertainment
Regina Weinreich

Along with Glenn Close, Meryl Streep hosted a premiere screening this week of Israel Horovitz' My Old Lady at MoMA. Her family in tow, husband Don Gummer and daughter Mamie, she was celebrating her pal Kevin Kline's lead performance in this charming romance set in Paris, as well as Horovitz' debut as filmmaker.

Aisle View: The Doddering Old Lady and the Kama Sutra

Steven Suskin | Posted 06.21.2014 | Arts
Steven Suskin

This is one of those "is the old lady losing her marbles?" plays, in which the doddering, aching, creaking, 79-year-old heroine drifts from witty perceptiveness to the borders of senility and back at the snap of the playwright's whim, all the while wondering "who is going to take care of my tree?"

First Nighter: CSC's 'A Man's a Man' Somewhat Mouse-y

David Finkle | Posted 04.01.2014 | Arts
David Finkle

Brian Kulick certainly attempts to get around the inherent problems with all manner of theatrical notions in a new translation by Gerhard Nellhaus, with Duncan Sheik's music carrying Brecht's customarily acerbic lyrics as Nellhaus frames them.

Discriminating Taste: Rhapsody in Black Puts Audiences on the Path to Transcending Racism

Jaime Lubin | Posted 01.23.2014 | Arts
Jaime Lubin

Charming, self-deprecatingly funny, linguistically awesome, LeLand Gantt imbues every word that falls from his mouth with all the passion and poignancy of a preacher speaking the Gospel. You will find truth and triumph in Rhapsody in Black.

Nicki Gostin

This Unstoppable 84-Year-Old Actress Is At It Again

HuffingtonPost.com | Nicki Gostin | Posted 05.08.2012 | Home

The delightful Broadway musical "Nice Work If You Can Get It" features a late second act surprise that almost brings the house down -- Estelle Parsons...

Stage Door: Good People

Fern Siegel | Posted 05.25.2011 | New York
Fern Siegel

Good People is a sensitive exploration of class and memory. David Lindsay-Abaire's play captures the claustrophobic nature of working-class poverty with humor and quiet pathos.