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European Democracy

The Czech Republic and the EU: Democracy Without Democrats

Jiri Pehe | Posted 08.10.2014 | World
Jiri Pehe

When, in 2003, some 78 percent of Czechs voted in in favor of joining the European Union, the mood in the country was optimistic. The country's economy had shown impressive growth rates; foreign investment had been booming. Joining the EU on May 1, 2004, was seen as a symbolic step underlining successful reforms that had been adopted during the process of accession. On the 10th anniversary of accession, the mood is far less optimistic. According to the latest surveys, about two-thirds of Czechs do not trust the EU, citing too much bureaucracy and overregulation as the main problems of the EU.

Economist Editors: How To Fix Our Broken Democracy

The WorldPost | Nathan Gardels | Posted 06.02.2014 | World

Recently, the Berggruen Institute’s Dawn Nakagawa interviewed John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge of The Economist about their new book, “...

Democracy's Conundrum: Reforms Take Time to Mature -- But Voters Want Results Now

Mario Monti | Posted 07.13.2014 | World
Mario Monti

All great reforms must first mature. To be successful, they must be fully understood by society. This process requires time and a lot of explanations. However, the need to obtain the consent of the people must not deter the leaders from their mission, even if it makes them unpopular. As it is written in the American Federalist Papers: "When occasions present themselves, in which the interests of the people are at variance with their inclinations, it is the duty of the persons whom they have appointed to be the guardians of those interests, to withstand the temporary delusion, in order to give them time and opportunity for more cool and sedate reflection (Federalist Papers Nr. 71). What is called "populism" nowadays is not really tantamount to defending the real interests of the people. Rather, it is a political ruse, which consists of using ultra-simplified language that is easily understood by the people, playing on their sense of fear, to conquer power.

Brits Want Obama-Style Change. Can They Grasp It?

Indra Adnan | Posted 05.25.2011 | Politics
Indra Adnan

With the arrival of a third party in the spotlight, there is a major chance of significant change -- not so much in the individual politician, but in the way we do politics in the United Kingdom.