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Government Surveillance

Surveillance: It's Worse Than You Think

Tom Engelhardt | Posted 06.26.2014 | Politics
Tom Engelhardt

Sooner or later -- count on it -- the company or business you work for will be capable, via intelligent software, of monitoring every move you make, not to speak of everyone you may be in touch with while on the clock.

Kathleen Miles

Glenn Greenwald Explains Why Privacy Is Vital, Even If You 'Have Nothing To Hide'

HuffingtonPost.com | Kathleen Miles | Posted 06.20.2014 | World

LOS ANGELES -- Journalist Glenn Greenwald defended the value of digital privacy and slammed those who dismiss its importance during a stop on his nati...

Uncle Sam Doesn’t Want You -- He Already Has You

William J. Astore | Posted 08.12.2014 | Politics
William J. Astore

You've been drafted into the American national security state. That much is evident from Edward Snowden's revelations. Your smartphone? It's a perfect tracking device if the government needs to find you. Your computer? Hackable and trackable. Your server? It's at their service, not yours.

Many Governments Listen To Phone Calls Anytime They Want: Report

AP | By DANICA KIRKA | Posted 08.06.2014 | Technology

LONDON (AP) — Government snooping into phone networks is extensive worldwide, one of the world's largest cellphone companies revealed Friday, saying...

Surveilling the Class of 2014

Tom Engelhardt | Posted 07.29.2014 | Politics
Tom Engelhardt

If you want a world in which you can't be taken possession of via your screen, in which you don't more or less automatically come with a dossier and a profile, I think you're going to have to slip those screens back into your pockets or, given that you can be tracked via your smartphones wherever you go (even if they're turned off), maybe into a desk drawer somewhere.

House Committees Take First Step to Reform NSA

Shahid Buttar | Posted 07.16.2014 | Politics
Shahid Buttar

Despite its welcome progress, the policy reform process reflects a troubling pattern of congressional deference to agencies and officials without any legitimate basis.

I Have Nothing to Hide: Government Surveillance Does Not Concern Me

National Council of La Raza | Posted 06.09.2014 | Latino Voices
National Council of La Raza

By Irasema Garza, J.D., Policy Advisor, NCLR Policy Analysis Center The old adage that nothing is certain in life except for death and taxes is no lo...

9 Ways You're Being Spied On Every Day

2013-02-21-grandparentslogo.jpg | Sara Schwartz | Posted 04.03.2014 | Fifty

SPECIAL FROM Grandparents.com Casinos. Banks. Airports. We all know there are public places where we're being watched, ostensibly for crime-prevent...

One Nation Under Surveillance. 5 Ways You Give The Government Control

Kenneth Coats | Posted 04.28.2014 | Politics
Kenneth Coats

No matter what a person's standpoint is on these matters, it's no longer possible to deny that U.S. intelligence agencies are monitoring the populace in huge numbers -- and it's becoming increasingly difficult to get out from beneath their lens.

How a Thug State Operates

Tom Engelhardt | Posted 04.22.2014 | Politics
Tom Engelhardt

Intelligence officials have weighed in with an estimate of just how many secret files National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden took with him when he headed for Hong Kong last June. Brace yourself: 1.7 million.

Gerry Smith

U.S. Tech Industry Could Lose Billions From NSA Scandal

HuffingtonPost.com | Gerry Smith | Posted 01.24.2014 | World

Election officials in India canceled a deal with Google to improve voter registration. In China, sales of Cisco routers dropped 10 percent in a recent...

The Need for Constitutional Lines in the Sand

Judge H. Lee Sarokin | Posted 03.23.2014 | Politics
Judge H. Lee Sarokin

The tension between security and liberty will increase as the years go on with each new attack or attempt. The country may debate whether or not Edward Snowden is a traitor or a patriot, but he has done something invaluable for the nation.

A Whistleblower's Wish for Edward Snowden

Jeremiah Horrigan | Posted 03.21.2014 | Politics
Jeremiah Horrigan

Let a jury hear a man speak from his conscience, let them recognize the risk he's taken to speak to them and let that jury compare his words and actions to a government that will insist he's nothing more than a common criminal.

Arguments On Surveillance Set In Teen's Terrorism Case

AP | Posted 01.23.2014 | Chicago

CHICAGO (AP) — A federal judge preparing for a Chicago terrorism trial is set to hear oral arguments on what, if anything, the government must revea...

Looks Like 1984 in Kansas

Paul Stoller | Posted 02.26.2014 | College
Paul Stoller

The Kansas Board of Regents, many members of which have been appointed by the governor, has voted to restrict academic free speech.

NSA Debate Experiences Sharp, Unexpected Shift

AP | JULIE PACE | Posted 12.20.2013 | Politics

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a sharp and unexpected shift, the national debate over U.S. government surveillance seems to be turning in favor of reining in ...

Drawing the Line on Government Surveillance

Rep. Mike Honda | Posted 02.08.2014 | Technology
Rep. Mike Honda

The revelations that have come out about the National Security Agency's PRISM program are disturbing. The scale and scope of the collection of information about electronic communications and telephone calls that originate and pass through the United States is truly astounding.

Writers Fear NSA 'Chilling' Effect

The Huffington Post | Matt Sledge | Posted 11.13.2013 | Politics

American writers are increasingly fearful of government surveillance in the wake of Edward Snowden's revelations about the National Security Agency an...

How Europeans And Americans Feel About Spying On Allies

Reuters | Posted 01.23.2014 | World

BRUSSELS, Nov 12 (Reuters) - Europeans and Americans largely oppose their governments spying on their citizens and those of allied c...

Feinstein, McCain Get Off the NSA Bus

William Bradley | Posted 12.29.2013 | Politics
William Bradley

Why did we do it? Why did we veer so far over the mark between inquiry and outright spying. Well, we may be getting some specific answers to that question. In the meantime, I think the broad answer is that we did it because we could do it.

Snowden Didn't Take Away Our Privacy, But We Can Still Reclaim It

Gloria Yu | Posted 12.29.2013 | Politics
Gloria Yu

In light of the fact that our behavior fails to align with our purported principles, we are compelled to reassess the value of privacy to American life and what we can do if we hope to reclaim it.

Obama, Congress Owe Snowden Thanks, and a Pardon

Robert Scheer | Posted 12.28.2013 | Politics
Robert Scheer

Now we know that even the president needs leaks from Edward Snowden to be fully informed about the dastardly acts of his own top spy agency.

NSA Does the Grand Tour

Michael Brenner | Posted 01.23.2014 | Politics
Michael Brenner

Being the last remaining super power and champion of the "free world' means that you never have to say you are sorry -- or, at least, that is the conviction of the White House. Being Barack Obama means that behavior others experience as offensive does not elicit an admission of error.

Merkel Scolds Obama

Jeff Danziger | Posted 12.24.2013 | Politics
Jeff Danziger

2013-10-24-Screenshot20131024at9.10.42AM.jpg

Journalists Using Snowden's Documents Are Protected by the First Amendment. But What About Snowden?

Peter Scheer | Posted 12.22.2013 | Media
Peter Scheer

This double-standard -- exposing government leakers to punishment while insulating the journalists who publicize their leaks -- may seem unfair, arbitrary, even offensive. The double-standard is nonetheless necessary.